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Car Auction Help.

daniel168 Avatar
6y, 10m agoPosted 6 years, 10 months ago
Has anyone any experience of buying a car at auction. I have no experience or knowledge yet of how to go about it so any help would be appreciated.

thankyou
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daniel168 Avatar
6y, 10m agoPosted 6 years, 10 months ago
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#1
I can't help you much but remember to add their fees on to the price you bid...Look for a large auction house and they sell different types on different days. MANHEIM AUCTIONS COLCHESTER is a large one./.Good luck
#2
yes we have.... the only problem is that if there are faults with the car you won't find out until after you own it :-( we bought a kia sedona from auction a few months ago & put it through it's mot fine, then after a couple of weeks we found out that it needed work doing that would cost over a thousand pounds & that no garage near us would touch because it was too hard work :-(
this was at hobbs parker, ashford
#3
If you don't know what you are doing, don't do it. No warranties. My father is a trader so I have been to tonnes of auctions, and seen so many members of the public buying the rubbish the traders won't touch.

From what I can gather, the shinier the car, the worse it will be!
#4
Hi

1. Go to a couple with no intention of buying and get a feel for what happens and how the bidding works etc.
2. Know what the extras are going to cost! VAT and auction fees are the normal ones but there can be others on top. If in doubt, take a calculator to work it out.
3. Set a budget and STICK to it. It's very easy to have just one more bid but there will always (unless it's a classic auction!) be another similar car soon
4. Get there early to view the cars and decide which ones you want to bid on.
5. If the viewing day or listing is available early, pick the ones you are interested in and get some research done on Auto-trader, completed ebay listings etc to get an idea of what prices are like.
6. If you can, go to auctions held on a week-day - there are far less amateurs/punters/consumers (not sure what to call them) pushing the price up - dealers always know when they've reached their profit margin limit and you have another 10-20% past that to play with, which is when you can get a real bargain.
7. ALWAYS buy a coffee and bacon butty from the scruffy hatch in the corner- it's the law!

Not an exhaustive list but a good starting point before you go.

Hope that helps

Dave
#5
Wirral_guy
Hi

1. Go to a couple with no intention of buying and get a feel for what happens and how the bidding works etc.
2. Know what the extras are going to cost! VAT and auction fees are the normal ones but there can be others on top. If in doubt, take a calculator to work it out.
3. Set a budget and STICK to it. It's very easy to have just one more bid but there will always (unless it's a classic auction!) be another similar car soon
4. Get there early to view the cars and decide which ones you want to bid on.
5. If the viewing day or listing is available early, pick the ones you are interested in and get some research done on Auto-trader, completed ebay listings etc to get an idea of what prices are like.
6. If you can, go to auctions held on a week-day - there are far less amateurs/punters/consumers (not sure what to call them) pushing the price up - dealers always know when they've reached their profit margin limit and you have another 10-20% past that to play with, which is when you can get a real bargain.
7. ALWAYS buy a coffee and bacon butty from the scruffy hatch in the corner- it's the law!

Not an exhaustive list but a good starting point before you go.

Hope that helps

Dave



I think the days of the car auction 'bargain' are numbered. Too many Joe Public's there these days. Ebay is OK but there are too many scammers. I would be inclined to go to Autotrader for the best deal (IMO)
#6
Foxy102
If you don't know what you are doing, don't do it. No warranties. My father is a trader so I have been to tonnes of auctions, and seen so many members of the public buying the rubbish the traders won't touch.

From what I can gather, the shinier the car, the worse it will be!


+1. And if you really must buy at auction, go a couple of times just to watch (and learn!) before you consider buying anything. Watch who buys the cars in your price range and see if you can spot the dealers. So, when you go again you're probably safe if you bid against a known dealer. It's his business to spot the lemons. :thumbsup:
#7
Link here to BCA http://www.british-car-auctions.co.uk/default.aspx?page=3218

click on find auction centres choose your local site then from there download the PDF to view what vehicles are on sale in the forth coming week.
#8
tony_s1
+1. And if you really must buy at auction, go a couple of times just to watch (and learn!) before you consider buying anything. Watch who buys the cars in your price range and see if you can spot the dealers. So, when you go again you're probably safe if you bid against a known dealer. It's his business to spot the lemons. :thumbsup:


This is a good point, but also be aware as i have seen a local dealer at a local auction bidding on his own cars......
#9
tony_s1
+1. And if you really must buy at auction, go a couple of times just to watch (and learn!) before you consider buying anything. Watch who buys the cars in your price range and see if you can spot the dealers. So, when you go again you're probably safe if you bid against a known dealer. It's his business to spot the lemons. :thumbsup:


However just be careful your not bidding against the dealer that's actually selling the vehicle :whistling:
#10
cakeybwoy
This is a good point, but also be aware as i have seen a local dealer at a local auction bidding on his own cars......


Great minds think alike :)
banned#11
Foxy102

From what I can gather, the shinier the car, the worse it will be!


Not true as most large auction houses valet and polish the cars for the suppliers, some even do the stone chip repairs and small scratches for a small fee.

"Most auctions don't like you asking to start the cars ive been to some where they point blank refuse, so stand close to the door they bring them through and you can see which cars needed a bump start".

Don't be put off just because they need to jump start the car, batteries soon go flat when a car is not in use. Stand by the cars you are interested in whilst they are being started and you'll be able to play around with the accelerator, clutch, and brakes. The staff that start them ain't the same as who drive them into the ring, so they are left running empty for a few minutes.

If your interested in a vehicle ask a trader if he will have a look at his CAP or Glass's and give you an evaluation or ring a mate at home with Internet (or use web phone/laptop) and ask what an equivalent car with same speck and mileage are going for on auto trader and deduct about 20%
as nothing on AT really sells for advertised price, but you wont an auction car cheaper than the AT real selling price....expect to be shocked by how much cars sell for though as the good ones do fetch good money if they are at the cheaper end (sub 4/5k). it's the more expensive cars where the real savings are to be had.

If you win a bid on a provisional sale then don't pay a penny more than you highest bid plus charges....it fetched what it was worth on the day and the seller will have to pay more if he wants it put through again.
#12
I think you are ok at the huge auctions than shift ex fleet cars eg BCA , but i wouldnt touch the small auctions that sell old bangers thats where all the cap goes.
#13
A few years ago when just traders went they used to know who was bidding on what and respect that dealer so they all got themselves a bargain!

Can't happen now with general admission.
#14
Lots of good advice above, in the early 90's me and my dad (who always bought his cars from the auctions) bought an Audi, guy outside offered us £500 more than we had paid. Right result, dad gave me half which then was a fair wack.

Take your time, understand what's going on, do your homework, go for a specific car and do not veer (there will always be more) and set yourself a limit and do not go over it. Get there ealry and give every one you are interested in a good look over, be there when they start them up, hop in whilst they are waiting to go in.

Depending on what sort of car you are after there are some bargains to be had. Just be careful.

At the end of the day it's no riskier than a private 'off the drive' sale, apart from you do not get a test drive.

9 times out of ten they are fleet cars with full service history and not really old enough to have major problems.

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