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change of shifts at work

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i work 40 hours each week, either doing 8-5 or 1-9, there are now deciding to change the shifts to 7-2 and 2-9 so that means i will be 5 hours short each week, which isnt to bad but over the month its… Read More
pink-ka Avatar
8y, 1m agoPosted 8 years, 1 month ago
i work 40 hours each week, either doing 8-5 or 1-9, there are now deciding to change the shifts to 7-2 and 2-9 so that means i will be 5 hours short each week, which isnt to bad but over the month its 20hours and we get paid monthly so its like half a weeks wage im losing, are they just allowed to change them like that as i am contracted to 40 hours each week, some of the staff are saying we have to do an extra shift to make our hours up but then that means im working 6days a week and i dont fancy doing that.
pink-ka Avatar
8y, 1m agoPosted 8 years, 1 month ago
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[mod]#1
In short..........yes.

Just be glad you have a job at the minute........this is probably the companies way of cutting back a bit.
#2
they are doing something similiar where the OH works too.x
#3
the companies always cutting back, there tight wads lol the only thing thats not fair is the people with kids dont have to change there shifts, which i do understand but it should apply to everyone, as the people who dont drive will struggle getting there for 7am specially on a sunday as most buses dont start till 7am ish. it doesnt bother me to much as i drive and it will be nice to finish early, its my partner whos not happy as we will be losing money.
#4
Check the working contract you signed when first starting, companies cannot change working hours without consulting with you first, also if you have children of school age, you are entitled to work flexi hours to suit your needs this is law.., do not let companies bully you
#5
they have to give you 12 weeks written notice of any change to your hours-its legal as long as they can show its for "the needs of the business".
#6
Also the European working directive states that there must be at least 11 hours between shifts, so if you finish at 21-00hrs on a Saturday night or any night shift, by law you cannot made to start work the following day untill 08-00hrs
#7
johnpaulturner
Also the European working directive states that there must be at least 11 hours between shifts, so if you finish at 21-00hrs on a Saturday night or any night shift, by law you cannot made to start work the following day untill 08-00hrs


Surely not valid if you have opted out like many people need to?
#8
they have to give you 3 months(I think) notice,or guarantee your wage for that period if they change it straight awaybut its perfectly legal..par for the course at the moment I am afraid
#9
When an employer changes an employee's job description or terms of the job, for example, increasing or decreasing the hours to be worked or cutting pay, the employer is varying the contract of employment.

In theory, a contract of employment is like any other contract and both parties must agree to a change for it to be effective. However, in most contracts the two parties agreeing to the terms of the contract have equal bargaining power. With contracts of employment, an employee does not have the bargaining power of the employer. This means that when an employer wants to change a term in an employee's contract, the employee's options are limited because s/he will want to keep the job.

Some contracts allow the employer to vary some or all of the terms and the employee will not then be able to reject the changes that are proposed.
For there to be a change in the contract of employment, the employee must be deemed to have accepted the change. S/he does not have to say 'I accept', nor does s/he have to sign anything or put anything in writing. Just continuing to work and not objecting to the change will mean that the employee accepts the change.

If an employee wishes to object to a change, s/he must take positive steps to do so. S/he should make clear to the employer, or employer's representative, such as a personnel manager or the employee's manager, that s/he objects and say why s/he objects. Preferably s/he should do this in writing and keep a copy of the letter. S/he may also wish to raise a grievance.
S/he cannot continue indefinitely working under protest. The client will also have to consider what further action to take. S/he must consider taking legal action where appropriate or resigning and claiming constructive unfair dismissal.
#10
Companies are having to make some tough decisions in this economic climate..

Do they ask for redundancies...
Do they force people to accept a redundancy package...
Do they fire whoever they can...
Do they ask everyone to take a cut in hours and thus in wages...
Do they cut the amount everyone is paid and ask them to work the same hours.

IMO, what your work is doing is probably the better option of all these.

Your wage coming in may be a little less but you're still employed.

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