Cheeky beggers! - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HotUKDeals, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HotUKDeals app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit

Cheeky beggers!

£0.00 @
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/08/05/bbc-to-deploy-detection-vans-to-snoop-on-internet-users/ Read More
raptorcigs Avatar
11m, 2w agoPosted 11 months, 2 weeks ago

Top Comments

(2)
8 Likes
LOL well if you believed the original van existed then I guess you might fall for it.

They really are the lowest of the low. Not satisfied with barging their way into people homes any more I guess.

Perhaps they would like a sample of my hair to test, to see if my DNA shows I have ever been in the presence of an episode of Dickinsons Real Deal. It should be mahogany on the inside, right?
7 Likes
stuarthanley
raptorcigs
stuarthanley
I don't believe that it's technically possible with closed/password protected WiFi
Just an update to the old TV detector Van urban legend.
If the bbc(small case intentional) upload a strange size of packet they would be able to detect this......apparently.
So, they're sat outside your house detecting that their service is being used by a wireless device somewhere in the vicinity of the van...
Where would they go from there?
Knock on your door. "can I come in? We believe you're watching TV illegally"
I'd hope people were a little more savvy nowadays when it comes to believing the BBC lies about TV detector vans and other such nonsense.
Good luck with my VM router it can cover about 6 inch.

All Comments

(144) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
Page:
#1
2 Likes #2
I don't believe that it's technically possible with closed/password protected WiFi

Just an update to the old TV detector Van urban legend.
2 Likes #3
How much wasted on jollies to Rio?
#4
Shirley in this day and age there is a better solution. (_;)

But this is the BBC, so to hell with logical solutions. :D
2 Likes #5
stuarthanley
I don't believe that it's technically possible with closed/password protected WiFi
Just an update to the old TV detector Van urban legend.
If the bbc(small case intentional) upload a strange size of packet they would be able to detect this......apparently.
3 Likes #6
Andy@XCite
Shirley in this day and age there is a better solution. (_;)

But this is the BBC, so to hell with logical solutions. :D
Correct,And don't call me Shirley.
3 Likes #7
just use wired connections and avoid viewing on wifi.. expect a run on homeplug adapters shortly
2 Likes #8
Doubtful, probably just a PR stunt of sorts. All they really need, and have ever needed, is a laser microphone.

Edited By: SUMMONER on Aug 06, 2016 01:24
8 Likes #9
LOL well if you believed the original van existed then I guess you might fall for it.

They really are the lowest of the low. Not satisfied with barging their way into people homes any more I guess.

Perhaps they would like a sample of my hair to test, to see if my DNA shows I have ever been in the presence of an episode of Dickinsons Real Deal. It should be mahogany on the inside, right?
4 Likes #10
WTF X)X)X)

While the corporation would not disclose how the new technology works, the report states that the BBC has ruled out combing its own records of computers that have logged into the iPlayer website to hunt down non-paying viewers.

Sir Amyas writes in the document: “The BBC rightly acknowledges that this would be an inappropriate invasion of privacy.”

So checking the IP addresses of people that have used iplayer is an invasion of privacy, when they have logged on of their own free will and given that information to the BBC. But using an undisclosed method of wifi hacking to spy on peoples internet usage is just fine? You couldn't make this **** up X)
1 Like #11
Wont miss the bbc tv as i didnt watch it anyroad, But Can i still download radio shows on the BBC radio player app, for listening to offline (Like when im on the train n stuff) or is that not going to be aloud either? can i still stream radio live after September? :|
1 Like #12
are these the same fake detector vans that claimed to be able to pickup and pin point where a tv signal was being viewed?

you know the vans that were apparently so advanced that they could park at the end of the street and scan every single house.

the vans that collected 'evidence' that hasn't once appeared as evidence in court to assist a prosecution.

Edited By: eset12345 on Aug 06, 2016 02:13
1 Like #13
Oh come on now, where is the petition link or social media trending hashbumblingidiotshysteria tag?

If we want anything done about these absolute incompetent hell ends. Then we need to get them publicised for being liars and fraudsters. There are elements of the BBC that I like. Though I'd probably not miss them with the exception of Sir David Attenborough.
1 Like #14
raptorcigs
stuarthanley
I don't believe that it's technically possible with closed/password protected WiFi
Just an update to the old TV detector Van urban legend.
If the bbc(small case intentional) upload a strange size of packet they would be able to detect this......apparently.
So, they're sat outside your house detecting that their service is being used by a wireless device somewhere in the vicinity of the van...
Where would they go from there?
Knock on your door. "can I come in? We believe you're watching TV illegally"

I'd hope people were a little more savvy nowadays when it comes to believing the BBC lies about TV detector vans and other such nonsense.
#15
o0bean0o0head0o
just use wired connections and avoid viewing on wifi.. expect a run on homeplug adapters shortly

This^
There's a clear message that they can only detect packets for iPlayer, so as long as your not using iPlayer you won't get caught.
2 Likes #16
They only have to ask me what I watch online/tv. One thing I don't watch is that Victoria Derbyshire pile of ****.

BBC News should be news, and sport should be kicked off the news channel as well.
#17
eset12345
are these the same fake detector vans that claimed to be able to pickup and pin point where a tv signal was being viewed?

you know the vans that were apparently so advanced that they could park at the end of the street and scan every single house.

the vans that collected 'evidence' that hasn't once appeared as evidence in court to assist a prosecution.


I worked with many people who spent time in these vans, they existed and were supposed to work, why else were engineers trained and paid to use the equipment. Admittedly one once said they sat outside Rumbalows and didn't find a TV but plenty of people got fined because of these vans, including my sister.
2 Likes #18
liamf12
eset12345
are these the same fake detector vans that claimed to be able to pickup and pin point where a tv signal was being viewed?
you know the vans that were apparently so advanced that they could park at the end of the street and scan every single house.
the vans that collected 'evidence' that hasn't once appeared as evidence in court to assist a prosecution.
I worked with many people who spent time in these vans, they existed and were supposed to work, why else were engineers trained and paid to use the equipment. Admittedly one once said they sat outside Rumbalows and didn't find a TV but plenty of people got fined because of these vans, including my sister.
My mate works at Birmingham Sea Life centre as a Dolphin Shaver too ;)
7 Likes #19
stuarthanley
raptorcigs
stuarthanley
I don't believe that it's technically possible with closed/password protected WiFi
Just an update to the old TV detector Van urban legend.
If the bbc(small case intentional) upload a strange size of packet they would be able to detect this......apparently.
So, they're sat outside your house detecting that their service is being used by a wireless device somewhere in the vicinity of the van...
Where would they go from there?
Knock on your door. "can I come in? We believe you're watching TV illegally"
I'd hope people were a little more savvy nowadays when it comes to believing the BBC lies about TV detector vans and other such nonsense.
Good luck with my VM router it can cover about 6 inch.
#20
liamf12
eset12345
are these the same fake detector vans that claimed to be able to pickup and pin point where a tv signal was being viewed?
you know the vans that were apparently so advanced that they could park at the end of the street and scan every single house.
the vans that collected 'evidence' that hasn't once appeared as evidence in court to assist a prosecution.
I worked with many people who spent time in these vans, they existed and were supposed to work, why else were engineers trained and paid to use the equipment. Admittedly one once said they sat outside Rumbalows and didn't find a TV but plenty of people got fined because of these vans, including my sister.

They explicitly told your sister she was fined because of a detector van? Hmmm....
#21
A few years old but quite an interesting article on detector vans:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2445153/Are-TV-detector-vans-just-cunning-trick-For-decades-claimed-trap-licence-cheats-In-fact-theyve-led-single-prosecution.html

And as mentioned in the headline, never lead to a single prosecution (unless there's been one more recently)
#22
BS.
#23
I am approaching the wrong side of 40 and have only ever seen a van once in my life. I believe the technology probably exists but is unreliable. In the old days of analogue tv I discovered that by turning a tv on close to another tv and adjusting the frequency of one, you would find a point where it would interrupt the signal on the first one, so it definitely transmits a signal as it receives one, but it would be difficult to pinpoint it.
2 Likes #24
As I've already said, Post Office engineers were sent out in these vans. I know because I've worked with many of them over 30 years. The equipment wasn't great and probably just the sight of the vans (which I used to see too) was a deterrent. Most people wouldn't argue and just accept the fine. Whether prosecutions were based on the technology I doubt it would be needed. They would gain entry & the presence of a working TV was evidence enough. These days people would argue it wasn't for live TV, but that will change next month.
2 Likes #25
The old detector vans dedected EMr from CRT TV sets. Moving the van around let them pinpoint the signal pretty accurately as it's stronger closer to the source.

Once flat screen and LED tvs became a thing in the mid 90s they were no longer useful because flats don't give off EMr at "detectible through a wall" strength and the vans became a gimmick.
#26
Why don't they just make the iplayer website password protected and use your license number/address as login details,surely someone at the beeb has thought of that given the money they are all earning.
#27
Andy@XCite
Shirley in this day and age there is a better solution. (_;)

But this is the BBC, so to hell with logical solutions. :D


Dont call me surely..
1 Like #28
sowotsdis
How much wasted on jollies to Rio?


yeah they shouldn't be covering what's really a local minor event in Rio.
1 Like #29
Well done BBC

God save the BBC
#30
so you lot are condoning theft

shame on u
1 Like #31
miles136
so you lot are condoning theft
shame on u

So you condone people being forced to pay for something they don't want miles-baby? I want nothing to do with the BBC yet to watch Sky I have to pay the BBC. There is NO COUNTER ARGUMENT to this. I am forced with the threat of prosecution, search warrants, yhreating letters monthly and Capital goons looking through my windows with telephotographic equipment using anti-terror legislation.
1 Like #32
Isnt this snooping highly illegal invasion of privacy?

I hope it is!
#33
miles136
so you lot are condoning theft
shame on u

No on here is condoning theft. We just don't appreciate having our wifi spied on to prove that we are not stealing! They have access to this information already, by way of the IP addresses logged that have used iplayer. This is completely unnecessary and a waste of money.

Fortunately it's you that's paying for it, not me.

The sooner they start selling large screens for gaming with no TV tuners in them and no smart TV functionally the better. I resent paying for all this gubbins too.
1 Like #34
haritori
Isnt this snooping highly illegal invasion of privacy?

I hope it is!

Not for the BBC apparently:

Packet sniffing is generally illegal on somebody else’s network but the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act gives certain bodies permission to monitor internet communications. The BBC has been given authority under the Act to watch home Wi-Fi connections.

They are above the law.
#35
moneysavingkitten
haritori
Isnt this snooping highly illegal invasion of privacy?
I hope it is!
Not for the BBC apparently:
Packet sniffing is generally illegal on somebody else’s network but the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act gives certain bodies permission to monitor internet communications. The BBC has been given authority under the Act to watch home Wi-Fi connections.
They are above the law.
But if you have denied them implied rights of access what then?
1 Like #36
miles136
so you lot are condoning theft
shame on u
Miles it isn't a case of condoning anything, it is simply that this purposed "solution" to the problem is astonishing and quite bizarre, not to mention a huge waste of money with a miniscule success/detection rate (if indeed it is what they are going to do which I highly doubt).
Shirley licence payers should expect a cheaper, robust system.

After all you don't see Amazon, Netflix (etc..) having an open system and then relying on detector vans.

Quite ludicrous in the extreme.
1 Like #37
Still don't know why they don't have a username and password system with the licence number acting as username. They are giving open access to everyone and then hoping they will catch people out. But why make it open when it's easier to have a closed system. Something not quite right.
#38
A VPN would be able to circumnavigate the BBC trying to snoop on who is watching I'm assuming?
#39
raptorcigs
moneysavingkitten
haritori
Isnt this snooping highly illegal invasion of privacy?
I hope it is!
Not for the BBC apparently:
Packet sniffing is generally illegal on somebody else’s network but the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act gives certain bodies permission to monitor internet communications. The BBC has been given authority under the Act to watch home Wi-Fi connections.
They are above the law.
But if you have denied them implied rights of access what then?

Depends how far your wifi signal goes I suppose.
#40
With BT currently advertising a WiFi range of 100+ metres, surely the BBC would need to prove who was using their iPlayer within the 100 metre vicinity? My WiFi is password protected but I wouldn't know whether anyone had hacked it and was using it without my consent. I know it happens though.

Post a Comment

You don't need an account to leave a comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!