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Clueless about anime? Great! I need your help...

Tune Up Avatar
9y, 1m agoPosted 9 years, 1 month ago
I needed to write an article on something, I chose anime. I've pretty much finished it today and I'm going to write it out tomorrow.

Would any of you mind telling me what you think of my article? It's aimed at people who know near to nothing about anime, so it's perfect for most on here to judge!



[U What is Anime?

By ****** ******


Anime has always been misunderstood by most of those in Europe, the UK population in particular being unable to view it as anything more than kids stuff or, worse yet, an animated form of pornography. You have to keep your secret love for anime a secret if you don't want to be looked down upon. I'm hoping I can get the people who read this to understand anime better.

The main reason for this problem is the age group (pre-teen) anything animated is aimed at over here, but the respectability of anime has not been helped at all by a large amount of anime being licensed and released in "kidified" form in certain European countries, where material is removed and the English dub isn't true to the original script in order it more appealing to young children.

[U "Kidification" Example:
Naruto, an anime aimed at teenage boys in Japan, started airing over here fairly recently on Jetix, a Disney channel. Just about all fighting, sharp weapons and blood was cut from the show...quite a problem when Naruto is about ninja fighting to the death!

Anime has not always been thought of as simply childish in the UK, mainly thanks to the badly named Manga Entertainment, a UK anime distributor. in an attempt to completely change the image of "cartoons" people had (or rather, still have) in the UK, Manga Entertainment and other early distributors of anime decided the best way to go about solving this problem was by releasing the most sick and perverted anime they could get their hands on, with anime involving monsters raping women throughout such as 'Urotsukidoji: Legend of the Overfiend' leading the way, also adding lots of pointless swearing in order to get the rating up to 18+. With anime distributors making every effort to convince the UK public that anime was the sickest thing you could buy, and the press writing lengthy articles calling for it to be banned before it turned our children into murderers and rapists, the reputation of anime took some serious blows before Pokemon came about.

The start of anime becoming "big" around the globe was when the internet and fansubbing came about. Fansubs are quite simply anime episodes with subtitles added by fan groups - People upload anime episodes onto the internet after they air in Japan, fansub groups add subtitles to them and release them for download on their websites. This is a very common thing these days and allows people outside of Japan to watch and understand what the Japanese themselves have only seen on a TV a few days before.


[U Back to Front

To understand anime, it's important to first understand where most the worlds and stories shown in anime come from - Manga.

Manga is the equivalent of comic books. These books have black and white picture panels and speech bubbles on each page. Outside of the fact nearly all animes are adaptations of manga, the most interesting thing about manga is that you read them back to front.

The start of manga becoming as huge as it is today began during the WWII occupation and post-occupation years in Japan. Artistic expression took a huge jump and the now famous Astro Boy and Sazae-san (the anime is still going today, some 51 years after starting) mangas started up. Manga kept growing until it become what it is today; part of Japanese culture.

The authors of manga work freelance, sending there work in (most work weekly, with 20 pages drawn each week) to magazines who publish it together with other work done by freelance artists. If the series gets good reviews they continue, the chapters they send in eventually getting put together and sold in volumes. If the author is lucky, someone will contact them and attempt to buy the creative rights to turn his/her manga into an anime; license it.

On a sidenote, UK anime distributor Manga Entertainment caused great confusion by putting manga in their name, resulting in people mistakingly believing that anime is called manga. Manga Entertainment say the reason for them deciding to confuse everyone by changing their name from Link World was because people in the UK thought of anime as manga when they formed, so they thought it was a good plan to confuse the issue further. Excellent logic.


[U Anime

Now that manga is explained, there's an obvious question that needs answering - Just what the hell is anime?

Strangely enough, a good amount of the Japanese would not know what you meant by anime if you walked up and tried to start a conversation about anime with your understanding of what anime is. Disney has just as much right as Akira to be classed as anime to the Japanese, most of whom are blissfully unaware of how the people outside of Japan view Japanese animation.

The word anime is used by people outside of Japan to describe animation worked on by the Japanese. Exactly when people outside of Japan started referring to anime as anime is unclear, although it's highly probable that those distributing started using the term in order to make anime seem unique and gain more interest; a sales angle.

The easiest way to spot anime would be by looking at how the characters eyes are drawn since insanely huge eyes are a normal thing in the world of manga and anime.


[U Origins

The first proven anime is 'Mukuzo Imokawa the Doorman', a five minute short by Oten Shimokawa that was created in 1916 and screened in 1917.

There has been lots of argument about the date when the first ever animated material came about in Japan since 2005 when Noaki Matsumoto discovered a scrap of film, barely 3 seconds long, drawn straight onto a blank film, and possibly never screened. 1907 has been a date thrown about for this unnamed 3 second clip, but the reason for that date is most likely down to the Japanese wanting Japan to be able to claim to have created animation, or at least claim to have not stolen it from anyone else.


[u Information

I'm sure you would find it rather unusual to sit down with your family and watch anime, wouldn't you? In Japan it's as normal as watching... I don't know, Eastenders with your other half or something. I was born in the wrong country!

Anime airs on just about every channel in Japan, mixed in with live-action programs. The "big" anime channels are TV Tokyo, Fuji TV and BSi.

Anime episodes last 24 minutes each, but we're talking more along the lines of 19-20 minutes with the exclusion of openings and endings (featuring new songs by popular Japanese music artists). Opening and endings last around 1.5 minutes each, openings usually staying the same for 26 episodes and endings for 13 episodes, although there's no rule saying they have to.

Similar to how openings and endings usually change after 26 and 13 episodes respectively, the majority of anime series end after 13 or 26 episodes, some ending quite near to those numbers and others simply going on endlessly.
Tune Up Avatar
9y, 1m agoPosted 9 years, 1 month ago
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#1
Japan's Disney

It's a safe bet that everyone reading this will have watched at least one Walt Disney film. Disney animations are respected by all, the young gain fond memories they carry forward with them and the old enjoy them almost as much.

Like Disney, there is a film studio in Japan that produces animated fims loved by all, a film studio called Studio Ghibli. Founded in 1985 by Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata, Ghibli films have received global acclaim. 'Porco Rosso' became the first Ghibli film to become the highest grossing film ever in Japan, followed in 1997 by 'Princess Mononoke' and then 'Spirited Away' in 2001 (Spirited Away was the first anime feature to win an Academy Award). There are currently 15 Ghibli films out, 16 if you include Nausicaa, a film made just before Ghibli was formed but directed by Hayao Miyazaki.

Studio Ghibli are known for not allowing any cuts to be made in order for their films to appeal to the audiences animation is generally aimed at outside of Japan. This "no edits" policy started after 'Nausicaa' was butchered when released outside of Japan as 'Warriors of the Wind' with major cuts and edits. It has since come to light that, In response to Miramax trying to make Princess Mononoke more marketable via cuts, one of the Studio Ghibli producers sent an authentic katana with a simple message: "No cuts".

The now retired Hayao Miyazaki, one of the founders of Studio Ghibli, is a God in the world of anime. His films often include themes of nature, life and the struggles of avoiding war. He is said to have personally checked each of the 144,000 cels in Princess Mononoke and is estimated to have redrawn parts of 80,000 of them - A perfectionist if there ever was one. His son, Gorō Miyazaki, has took over from his father after his retirement, directing 'Tales from Earthsea' as his first film, which was released in 2006.


Young and Old

I touched on anime being misunderstood at the start and now I'm going to go into a little more detail.

While it's true that anime is undoubtedly aimed more at children than it is pensioners, there is no real age limit - Just like Hollywood films aren't all aimed at one specific age group. Some anime are light and fun natured, others are dark and disturbing. It's a huge change when 'The Lion King' is probably the most adult animated material people in the UK would've seen before watching anime!

Examples are probably the best way to get people to understand how dark and mature anime can be:

Example 1: Death Note
An anime designed for an adult audience if there ever was one.

Death Note is told from the perspective of Light Yagami, an extremely intelligent 17 year old student in Japan. Bored with life and fed up with seeing human trash get away with crimes, his life takes a drastic change when he discovers a death note; a book that allows him to kill anyone whose name he writes in it, providing he has the persons face in his head when writing. With his new power Light starts to think of himself as God, attempting to shape the world how he wants it, but a nemesis soon arrives in the form of L, a world famous detective famous for solving every he cases he takes...

Example 2: Gungrave
Something rare in my anime viewing - An old fashioned gangster tale, mixed with the undead elements of the games it's very loosely based on. With a story of 2 friends rising through a mafia organization and eventually going in different directions, ultimately ending with both thinking one had betrayed the other, the meaning of the show would probably go over the head of the immature.

Since this is going on a bit, I'll end the examples with 2. The point I'm trying to make by using the above example is that Pokemon isn't the limit when it comes to the intelligence and maturity of anime.


Terminology of an Otaku

Just like we have various film genres and names for those genres, anime has its own unique set of genres and terms used to describe them.

In order to help you understand, here are a few:

Shounen:
Literally meaning young boy, this genre is (very surprisingly!) aimed at teenage males, involving stories with a heavy amount of fighting and not too much in the way of thinking material. This types of anime have proved to be heavily popular even with males in their 20s.

Shoujo:
Literally meaning young girl, this genre is the female equivalent of the shounen genre. This genre focuses on the drama and romance side of things. Shouju has a sub-genre known as mahou shoujo, involving magical girls with powers, which is aimed at girls who prefer to see more fighting and less romance.

Hentai:
Literally meaning pervert, this is the darker, pornographic side of anime. There are various sub-genres that exist for this, from yuri (lesbian porn) to sick stuff such as guro (mutilation porn).

I'll be here all week if I explain the meaning of every genre. Let's just say there are a lot!

...oh! You're wondering what the last word in the sub-heading means? Otaku literally means geek. People outside of Japan have ignored the actual meaning to a certain extent and use to describe an anime expert, not viewing it as an insult.


Voice Acting and Music

As a direct result of the popularity of anime in Japan, voice acting is HUGE. There's an endless amount of voice acting work available in Japan with the amount of anime series and films (roughly 60% the animated series in the world) released each year, making Japan the paradise of the voice actor/actress business.

Due to the size of the animation industry in Japan, seiyu (what the Japanese call voice actors and actresses) are able to to focus fully on voice acting. Japan also has the institutions to support the career path, with around 130 seiyu schools. They often attract their own fans who watch shows specifically to hear their favourite actor or actress.

Even outside of Japan there are a huge amount of people who prefer to watch anime subbed with the original Japanese voice acting. This is down to various reasons, the Japanese voice acting industry being bigger and having more talented voice actors/actresses being just one, but some simply prefer watching hearing in its original, untainted form.

The soundtracks of anime series also need mentioning since there are many, many amazing composers in the anime industry, such as Yuki Kajiura (.hack//SIGN, Madlax), who has also composed the music for the highly popular Xenosaga video game series, Yoko Kanno (Cowboy Bebop, Wolf's Rain) and Joe Hisaishi, who worked as composer on nearly all the Ghibli films. Short on people with musical talent Japan is not.


Closing

Well, without going into too much detail and adding a list my recommendations, this is pretty much as far as this can go.

I hope this article has helped those with little to no knowledge of anime understand it a little better!
#2
It's good, but then it's not really aimed at me as i'm a total geek about that stuff.

I download the DB fansubs of Bleach and Naruto and the Vegapunk Fansub of One piece. I just love how there is this whole genre of quality TV that people dismiss as "Kids Stuff".

Favorites: Cowboy Bebop, Samurai Champloo, Full Metal Alchemist, Death Note, Bleach, Rurouni Kenshin.
#3
I used to download the DB subs of both Naruto and Bleach. I've stopped watching Naruto after Shippuden destroyed it and have semi-dropped Bleach due to the fillers.

My favourite series: Death Note, Code Geass, Gungrave, Berserk, Full Metal Alchemist, Chrno Crusade, Wolf's Rain, Get Backers, Cowboy Bebop...
#4
It doesn't look like I'll be getting much feedback. :thinking:
#5
You spelt Chrono wrong.

Havent read much of your article, but yeah anime is dumbed down for non japanese audiences, even live action.

The Japanese Power Rangers, called Super Sentai is aimed at familys yet had things like female rangers naked in bath(you obviously dont see body parts lol) the odd swear word, cross dressing rangers(really! in disguise lol) characters die, some blood etc.

Or the anime Dragonball Z where characters have been killed, the best example is the first Budokai game on ps1/gamecube, it was subbed but S""" was replaced with "darn" F""" was replaced with Aunt Sally im being serious btw.

I mean, someone has just ruined your plans of world domination is about to kill you, what do you say "DARN!"

The series cut things out like someone who was hit so hard he had his hand fall off, and another who was sliced and diced into over a dozen pieces. This was cut out(lol) and jokes made about hemmoroids and cat food(really)
#6
ryouga
You spelt Chrono wrong.


I didn't - The original Japanese version is called Chrno Crusade. The Americans decided to change Chrno into Chrono, those in Europe deciding to also use Chrono.
1 Like #7
I don't like it.

The most important part of any body of work is its introduction. It needs to pose a question, make a point, or raise a challange with its audience. It needs to interest them. Your article there doesn't do any of that. Let's look at the first paragraph.


Anime and the UK


Read this with a mind clear of previous knowledge. What does it make you think of, and what does it make you expect of an article? What does it tell you about the article?

It made me expect an article about Anime's penetration of British culture. As a reader, I feel faintly robbed by getting something else. As it is, I'm not sure why the UK is even mentioned in the article's title, since it barely featured past the opening two paragraphs.

Anyway, moving on.



Anime has always been misunderstood by most of those in Europe, the UK population in particular being unable to view it as anything more than kids stuff or, worse yet, an animated form of pornography. You have to keep your secret love for anime a secret if you don't want to be looked down upon. I'm hoping I can get the people who read this to understand anime better.


I don't like this either, for the following reasons:

- The opening sentence rambles. It needs to be concise.
- Why "Anime has always been misunderstood"? I think "Anime has never been understood" would be more direct.
- "Most of those in Europe" - it's okay to generalise millions of people if it shortens a sentence. They won't mind.
- "You have to keep your secret love for anime a secret" is just clumsy. And using "you" in place of "fans" is confusing. When did I get dragged into this? And the accuracy of that statement is dubious anyway - since when have fans of anything kept it a secret?
- "I'm hoping I can get the people who read this to understand anime better." - in this line here, you obliterate all expectations I had from the headline, and reveal the article to basically be a beginner's guide to Anime + some basic stuff about its politics



I may be repeating myself here, but a good into needs to be direct. It needs to grab the reader's attention. Don't be afraid to assert yourself. It's your article they're reading, you have their attention. You needn't shyly explain that you're "hoping to get people to understand", tell them that if they read what you have to say, they will understand. They're sadly mistaken if they think they have some sort of choice in the matter.


With regards to the rest of the article, it's a good introduction to anime, but do you want to just tell people about anime, or inspire them with your enthusiasm and love of the media to check it out for themselves? You've got to paint pictures with words to entice people. Make it sound amazing, colourful, like their lives won't be complete until they experience the wonder or the intensity for themselves. Make it out to be the most incredible stories that can be told by man, free from the constraints of possibility, CG, budget and all that bullsh*t, and limited only by the imagination of geniuses. You've got to make it sound not just desirable, but essential.
#8
Well, thank your honesty, I appreciate it. :thumbsup: I was starting to think no-one was going to bother offering constructive criticism.

I doubt I would get enough criticism from my English teacher. She's as smart as she is soft, and I doubt she'd want to hurt my feelings after I'd typed and wrote so much.

dxx
Read this with a mind clear of previous knowledge. What does it make you think of, and what does it make you expect of an article? What does it tell you about the article?

It made me expect an article about Anime's penetration of British culture. As a reader, I feel faintly robbed by getting something else. As it is, I'm not sure why the UK is even mentioned in the article's title, since it barely featured past the opening two paragraphs.


You're correct about the title - It doesn't sit right with anything below the introduction. I kept it because, lacking originality as it may be, it was the title I picked at the start...without putting much thought into what would need doing.

My original plan was to type/write an article about anime in the UK and not just an explanation about the basics of anime. Quite simply, I didn't know enough about the past of UK anime to do it properly then and I don't now, only the obvious "cartoons are childish" rubbish. I actually got informed about the period where anime was thought of as nothing more than animated pornography when I had nearly finished!

- "Most of those in Europe" - it's okay to generalise millions of people if it shortens a sentence. They won't mind.


It's hard for me to put it any other way with there being no figures to quote. While it would've been wiser for me to stick to talking about the UK and the UK alone, it's true that the issues the majority of the UK have with being unable to view anything animated as anything other than childish are the same in the rest of Europe.

- "You have to keep your secret love for anime a secret" is just clumsy. And using "you" in place of "fans" is confusing. When did I get dragged into this? And the accuracy of that statement is dubious anyway - since when have fans of anything kept it a secret?


My wording with "you" instead of "fans" is wrong. Thank you for correcting me.

How many people have you heard discussing anime?
How many people have you seen with anime t-shirts and the like?
How many advertisements have you seen (of kind) for anime, or even manga?
How much anime have you seen on TV when browsing through the TV channels?

Forgive me for asking 20 (or rather, 4) questions, I felt that was the best way to get my point across. Anime is respected by those not in the know just as much the stuff on CITV.

I may be repeating myself here, but a good into needs to be direct. It needs to grab the reader's attention. Don't be afraid to assert yourself. It's your article they're reading, you have their attention. You needn't shyly explain that you're "hoping to get people to understand", tell them that if they read what you have to say, they will understand. They're sadly mistaken if they think they have some sort of choice in the matter.

With regards to the rest of the article, it's a good introduction to anime, but do you want to just tell people about anime, or inspire them with your enthusiasm and love of the media to check it out for themselves? You've got to paint pictures with words to entice people. Make it sound amazing, colourful, like their lives won't be complete until they experience the wonder or the intensity for themselves. Make it out to be the most incredible stories that can be told by man, free from the constraints of possibility, CG, budget and all that bullsh*t, and limited only by the imagination of geniuses. You've got to make it sound not just desirable, but essential.


I see what you're saying - My article lacks any heart. It comes across similar to how I would if I was trying to sell it to people irl by talking in a boring and lifeless voice. As helpful as it may be to a beginner with the information provided, it would bore someone with no previous anime experience to tears.

The other day I read a review about an anime I watched in the past. This guy allowed his personality to come out while keeping it intelligent and making strong points. I could learn a lot from reading more stuff like that.
#9
I think that dxx makes some really helpful comments, and I hope that you have time to take them on board. Was there a word-count limit? I ask this as it does seem a little like an attempt at a 'conversion' - perhaps if you critically 'chopped' it, your essay would be a little more focussed.

The other things I'd add is that it's not usual (AFAIK) to write essays in the first person, you should use 'xx' rather than "xx" when using a colloquial phrase, and also it's not usual to use headings in essays. Essays should 'flow' from one topic to the next without the need for headings. Also, recheck your spelling and no need for comments like 'what the hell is anime?'.

Re your teacher not being up to the job ... is this really true, or is it just that she makes criticisms that you don't agree with? Either you're correct, and she's not up to the job (in which case your parents should be complaining to the school), or you aren't getting the most from what she does know - either due to her poor communication or you not taking it in.

Anyway, good look with the article.
#10
melissab
Was there a word-count limit? I ask this as it does seem a little like an attempt at a 'conversion' - perhaps if you critically 'chopped' it, your essay would be a little more focussed.

There was no limit. It probably would've been simpler for me if there was with anime being such a huge subject.

The other things I'd add is that it's not usual (AFAIK) to write essays in the first person, you should use 'xx' rather than "xx" when using a colloquial phrase, and also it's not usual to use headings in essays. Essays should 'flow' from one topic to the next without the need for headings. Also, recheck your spelling and no need for comments like 'what the hell is anime?'.

I was given a set of brief instructions explaining how to go about the article, one of the instructions being to use sub-headings where necessary.

The "What the hell is anime?" comment was me attempting to sound less like a machine.

Re your teacher not being up to the job ... is this really true, or is it just that she makes criticisms that you don't agree with? Either you're correct, and she's not up to the job (in which case your parents should be complaining to the school), or you aren't getting the most from what she does know - either due to her poor communication or you not taking it in.

Anyway, good look with the article.


I didn't say she wasn't up to the job; I said she was kind. A strict teacher would get straight to the point and a kind teacher would be less direct. I'm not sure if that makes her a bad teacher or not.

The best thing I can do now is change the title so the topic doesn't seem to be quite so deceptive. It's probably best I leave the body of the article as it is for me to be corrected - I'd feel like a cheat if I went through and attempted to correct it now. And, to be honest, it would probably be a better idea to start over than edit it at this point since, going on what's been said, just about everything has been done wrong.
banned#11
It is a good, well written essay .

I agree that most people do not understand the subject but this is not the issue.

I hope that your teacher appreciates the work that you have put into it and marks it accordingly.
#12
Tune Up
And, to be honest, it would probably be a better idea to start over than edit it at this point since, going on what's been said, just about everything has been done wrong.



I (and presumably dxx) thought that by posting on here asking for comments, you were asking for our opinions to do something with them :thinking:

If I'd known that you were just fishing for compliments, I wouldn't have gone to all the effort of reading your work, and making what I thought were useful suggestions as to how you could improve your writing.
#13
Tune Up
I needed to write an article on something, I chose anime. I've pretty much finished it today and I'm going to write it out tomorrow.

Would any of you mind telling me what you think of my article? It's aimed at people who know near to nothing about anime, so it's perfect for most on here to judge!




[CENTER]What is Anime?[/CENTER]


By ****** ******




I don't like your name, I think you've made it up.

An F for you sir, must try harder. And when your parents turn up for parent/teacher evening, I'll be having words.
#14
melissab
I (and presumably dxx) thought that by posting on here asking for comments, you were asking for our opinions to do something with them :thinking:

If I'd known that you were just fishing for compliments, I wouldn't have gone to all the effort of reading your work, and making what I thought were useful suggestions as to how you could improve your writing.


Fishing for compliments? I knew it wasn't very good before posting, I'm not blind. I don't require advice from someone who throws accusations at people before thinking.

I wanted people to point out what's wrong and explain why. dxx gave me exactly what I wanted, pointing out what I did wrong and taking the time to explain why. The problem is that understanding my article is boring and being able to make it interesting aren't one and the same.
#15
I wasn't throwing accusations - sorry if it seems that way to you. I just meant that I read all of your article, and took the time to make suggestions, as I thought you were planning on refining your article based on (some of) the suggestions given. To see you write that you were going to hand it in 'as is' made me wonder what the point of posting asking for comments was.

I'm not sure that I understand your last sentence, I'm afraid. I think you mean that anime isn't everyone's cup of tea, but that shouldn't stop you from writing an interesting article. Is that what you meant? If it is, I agree ... and that's why I gave you what I thought were helpful comments to improve your essay.

If you wanted me to expand on some of the points I made, and explain exactly why spelling needs checking, or writing 'what the hell....' isn't a good idea, you could have just asked ....
banned#16
I cannot understand why people are slagging off a piece of work in which someone has devoted time.

He only ask for and advice, no need for completely negative comments.

If you have nothing useful to say, then don't bother.

With regards to "I don't like your name", what the **** does that matter.
#17
melissab
I wasn't throwing accusations - sorry if it seems that way to you. I just meant that I read all of your article, and took the time to make suggestions, as I thought you were planning on refining your article based on (some of) the suggestions given. To see you write that you were going to hand it in 'as is' made me wonder what the point of posting asking for comments was.

I'm not sure that I understand your last sentence, I'm afraid. I think you mean that anime isn't everyone's cup of tea, but that shouldn't stop you from writing an interesting article. Is that what you meant? If it is, I agree ... and that's why I gave you what I thought were helpful comments to improve your essay.

If you wanted me to expand on some of the points I made, and explain exactly why spelling needs checking, or writing 'what the hell....' isn't a good idea, you could have just asked ....


I'm near enough completely uneducated. This article isn't for getting a grade or anything like that, it's for to learn how to correctly do an article and for me to improve my writing ability.

With the article due in tomorrow, there wouldn't be much point throwing away what I've done so far and starting again. The article wouldn't be a whole lot better than it is now - I could make it a little less long-winded, I could correct a few of the errors highlighted, I could attempt to change the introduction...but I wouldn't be able to magically make my writing more interesting, which appears to be the main issue here.

The point of asking was for people who wouldn't mind being honest telling me what they, knowing nothing about anime, thought of the near finished article. I want to know what's wrong with it so I can discuss it my teacher if she doesn't highlight the problems.

If you wish to expand on what you said in your original post, go ahead. Every little bit of information helps when you know nothing.
#18
Tune up may I ask what age you are? Not for any other reason than it gives people a level on which to judge yer work. I'm guessing as you mentioned your teacher you either at school or perhaps college??

Anyhoo
I liked your article I think some of your sentence structure could do with tightening and maybe add a little to your close perhaps recommending, in your opinion, a good film to start an interest in anime. (IMHO I would go for one of the Studio Ghibli films). But all in all its a good article
#19
I'm 19.

Saying my age doesn't do much since, like I said before, I'm near enough fully uneducated. I'm trying to learn what I should've in the past now.

Anyway, got to run. Thanks to those who gave constructive criticism and others.
#20
sorry tune up I'd started writing my reply and then went for dinner so missed your first reply IYKWIM and I was too darn lazy to go and edit my post :lol:
banned#21
Tune Up
I'm 19.

Saying my age doesn't do much since, like I said before, I'm near enough fully uneducated. I'm trying to learn what I should've in the past now.

Anyway, got to run. Thanks to those who gave constructive criticism and others.


You are not uneducated, more like doing the best with the hand you have been dealt.

In the time I have known you, you have become more observent, but never have I considered you to be any less knowledgeable than the next person on here. Quite the opposite in fact.
#22
Well not sure if this is anything you can get any referance from since i only posted it on another forum a year or so back expalaining what it was.

What is Anime?

Anime is the Japanese shortened word for 'animation'.

In Japan, 'anime' would be any animated production, from Disney to Legend of the Overfiend. Anything that is animated, be it Japanese, English or French. Outside Japan, though, 'anime' tends to refer, specifically, to Japanese animation.

In Japan, anime is a rather popular form of entertainment. It comes in the form of tv shows, movies at the cinema as well as direct to video releases (OVA - Original Video Animation). Unlike in the west, anime has a huge variety of genres - it is not only for children. Nor, on the other hand, is it just sex and violence for adults! Anime is for everybody!

Most of the time, anime comes from a manga - Japanese comics. Occasionally, though, you'll get an anime first, and the manga will follow... but as a general rule, anime comes from a popular manga series. The manga are sold in anthologies, either weekly or monthly, and have a huge number of readers! Even more, if you consider that these anthologies are read once, and left on the train (often by businessmen and office ladies on their way to work - manga, you see, doesn't have the same stigma as comics tend to have in the west) for someone else to read. (They are cheap throw-away items - the Japanese version of graphic novels follow, and these are more likely to be collected.) As with anime, manga comes in many genres for all age groups - manga for businessmen, women, boys, girls, romance, fashion, adult titles, sports and more. It's a huge industry in Japan, and very, very popular.

Anime for children would include Pokemon, Minky Momo ('Gigi' in English), Dragon Ball, Card Captor Sakura and Sailor Moon. If you see the original versions, you'll probably notice there is a lot that has been edited for the western releases. From the anime I have seen, the Japanese version do not try to protect children from death - it actually happens in anime. For instance, in Sailor Moon, the senshi (scouts) die in the end of the first season. (In the American version, they were 'trapped' but got away.) This is not to say that Japanese children are happy with the concept of death - it's just that it is not a 'no-no' topic for even children's anime.

Anime for teenagers would include Ranma 1/2, Urusei Yatsura (Lum), Marmalade Boy and Fushigi Yugi. Again, the 'no-no' subjects of the west are found in these anime. Fushigi Yugi introduces subjects like rape, and Ranma 1/2 has some nudity (though this is definitely not porn - the nudity is mostly kept to places like the bathroom, or as a laugh when the male Ranma changes into a woman and he's still acting like a male.) The different values tend to clash - if this sort of anime was to be put on television, it would probably only make it to pay tv (cable), or on a foreign language channel. But one can hope...!!!

There are also a multitude of anime for young adults and adults - Tenchi Muyo, Cowboy Beebop, Dirty Pair (not what you think!!), Dragon Half, Evangelion, DNA^2, Maison Ikkoku, Legend of the Overfiend, Dark City, Gundam, and Mononoke-hime to name a few. A number of these probably fit into the teenage category, as some of them tend to be fine for all ages.

These anime mentioned above are ones that are (or have been) popular in the west, not only in Japan. There are anime in all genres - romance, fantasy, science fiction, comedy, hentai (erotic anime), drama, action... just about any genre you find in the west, you'll find in anime! As you can clearly see, anime is not just for children!

An unfortunate part of the western mindset is that animation is for children. Parents will sometimes go to a video shop, and pick up Overfiend (tentacled monsters raping women, for a start!) for their kids to watch. Why? Because it's animated. They don't look at the rating, nor read the back cover. And so there are some groups of people totally against anime for this reason.

There is also the sad fact that certain companies put out anime that is only violence and sex related! Manga Video, unfortunately, projects the image that all anime is sex and guns. True, they put out Ghost in the Shell and, in the US, anime like Maris the Chojo ('The Supergal'), Firetripper and the Laughing Target... but most of their videos are Overfiend-like, and that is how they market the anime to the population. I think it's self destructive, but they obviously make money that way.

Recently, though, the foreign movie channel here (SBS) has been showing anime... dubbed, because that's what the Australian anime sellers have been giving them, but anime none the less! Most of the films, though, were Manga Video movies, but they have been showing Patlabour, Porco Rosso and the tv series of Evangelion. It was great to see Eva on regular tv! It's a step in the right direction - anime on tv, uncut and uncensored! (When showing things on tv, the American censors cut out or edit some of the silliest things, IMO!)

Anime is growing in popularity, down here. I hope it continues, and one day, we might see subtitled anime on SBS, and regular anime showings on the commercial networks!

Never seen anime? Go out, find an anime club near you. Find a video store with anime! Pick a genre you like, and ask for an anime in that genre! Watch, and enjoy!
#23
is this for AS level english ? cos ive just done that. ermm what publication if it is AS? if its anything lower then mad props to you.
#24
Just wondering what age you are before giving opinions :)

Never mind should have checked out page 2 before saying that

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I'd try to make it a more intresting read. The backbone is good, but try to make people want to read on and then go on to try anime.

Also try chucking in some interesting facts. In your japanese disney section, that would have been the perfect place to mention the partnership between studio ghibli and disney. Rereleasing of Kiki's etc. Maybe also bring in some english/american household names who have been brought in to dub the movies. (Kirsten Dunst, Dakota Fanning)


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How about, until the recent additions of 'world cinema' sections in popular movie stores. If the shop stocked anime at all it was most often found in the childrens section no matter what the content.

yet again a manga tie in so don't think this will be useful, but the uk branch of tokyopop (the manga company) had to start to cele-wrap their mangas that had adult content such as sex/violence, as the bookstores kept placing all the mangas on the bottom shelves in the chil section. Meaning that all the kids had access to books such as Battle Royale and their parents were buying them for the child, or the kids were just randomly flicking through them while instore.

Not sure if you are planning on basing it completely around the shows, but maybe mention Manga and its connections/differences. Also maybe a bit about the fans, as you get everyone from the occasional viewer to the hard core cosplayers, who can be seen at events around the world and to a lesser extent film cons in the uk such as collectormania (which recently had guests such as Sean Schmell (sp?) voice of Goku)

Not to mention the anime/computer game connection, the anime/movie connection and the anime/music connection.

Also when comparing it to acceptable shows in the UK, why not mention the simpsons, granted the simpsons is a cartoon but it is sociable acceptable for people of all age to watch and isn't just seen as a kids show.

Don't know if any of the above is useful, but will be happy to spout more ideas if you wish :)

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Yet another edit as I just noticed how old this thread was lol

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