Computer Specifications. - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HUKD, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HUKD app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit

Computer Specifications.

glenncraneuk Avatar
8y, 9m agoPosted 8 years, 9 months ago
Has anyone got a good website, or can give me a brief explanation of what each part of a computers specification is used for.
Such as what the processes main job is!
The hard drive, the graphics card, the RAM etc.

Also as an extra if possible a site that says If you wanted a pc for a certain activity what you would need to look for!

PS: Its basically just basic info on the different parts of the computer! If anyone does know a good website it would be much appreciated.
glenncraneuk Avatar
8y, 9m agoPosted 8 years, 9 months ago
Options

All Comments

(17) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
1 Like #1
This should give you all/most of the info you need. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personal_computer
#2
Also as an extra if possible a site that says If you wanted a pc for a certain activity what you would need to look for!


If you say what you are looking for here I'm sure quite a few members will be happy to give you advice ;-)
1 Like #3
I'll give you a quick run down:
Hard drive
Where the operating system and any data you save (images, audio, video, applications, settings etc.) is stored.
The larger you hard drive the more data you can store. 200Gb is plenty for the average user.
RAM (Random Access Memory)
Any programs that are open will require a bit of memory to work. The more RAM you have, the more programs you can have open at once. Also, it affects the speed of the computer. So I'd say get as much RAM as possible. 1-2Gb is standard. I would recommend 2Gb minimum. More if you are running Windows Vista.
Graphics card
Cheaper computers have 'integrated graphics' these are suitable for playing basic videos and dvd's, possibly a bit of light 3D work. More expensive computers have 'dedicated graphics' which has it's own RAM to display graphics more efficiently. You'll want one of these if you plan on playing games, watching HD movies or doing any heavier 3D work. I'd recommend a dedicated graphics card. I'd look for 128mb or more RAM within the dedicated graphics card, the more the better though.
#4
I think it might be worth having a look around the howstuffworks website:

http://computer.howstuffworks.com/pc.htm

A quick sum up would be:

Processor - this is the brains and the 'grafter' of the system, it tells all the other parts what to do and actually crunches through the data provided. Generally most uses of a computer will benefit from a faster processor however those that rely heavily on the processor are number crunching tasks such as compiling a software program, converting a movie etc. The clock speed of a processor refers to the amount of instructions it can handle per second however this is not an overall indicator of performance as some processors can run very fast but only a little work on each clock cycle such as the Pentium4 whereas others run at lower speeds but do more work per clock cycle like the Core 2 Duo processors.

Ram - this is the computer's workspace, it holds all the data that the processor is currently working on. When you load up your browser for example, windows will copy the necessary data into the ram where it can access it much faster than on the hard drive. When you run out of physical ram the processor has to use the hard drive instead (this is virtual memory or paging file), when this occurs your system will slow down as the hard drive access is far slower than your ram. Choosing the right amount of ram for your system is important, for many people loading up the system with 4GB ram would simply be a waste because if they're not running the applications that will take advantage of it then the ram will sit there doing nothing. However if you are running intensive applications then ensuring you have enough ram is vital because if you run out your system will slow right down. Typical examples of programs that use a lot of memory are ones such as Photoshop, 3D modelling, high power games etc.

Hard drive - this stores all your data, hard drives are mechanical devices which spin round to position the head above the right section to get the data. Like the processor most applications will benefit from a faster hard drive as you're almost always loading and saving data to it

Graphics card - at the most basic level, the graphics card converts the data being provided from the processor and converts it to a 2D picture to send to your monitor. The difference between graphics cards is the amount of processing ability they have, a top end graphics card can work through sophisticated graphics far faster which means you can play a game at a higher resolution with more detail and more features enabled. A graphics card can also help in watching high definition video by giving the processor assistance to decode the file. You will benefit from a better graphics card in anything that needs 3D hardware acceleration which is typically games or modelling applications (autoCAD, maya, 3Dstudio etc.). Be very careful not to fall into the trap of basing graphics cards on the amount of memory - this is where companies take advantage of people who assume the more memory they are getting the better but it's not as simple as that. Always aim for the best graphics card core and then worry about the memory - for example an 8600 with 256MB ram will outperform an 8400 with 512MB ram.

John
#5
Magic_monkey
I'll give you a quick run down:
Hard drive
RAM (Random Access Memory)
Graphics card



Does your PC work Magic_monkey ?? I mean with only 3 items in the case :-)
#6
ricko
Does your PC work Magic_monkey ?? I mean with only 3 items in the case :-)


Yea got a bit bored after typing that out, might add to it later... :thumbsup: hehe
banned 1 Like #7
you only need like 6 things to make a computer work (not including case)

HDD - long term stuff is stored here. unlike RAM data here is still here when you turn your computer off

RAM - larger capacity and speed the better. this is the working out space for the processor

Mother board - everything gets connected via this. this is the mortar of your computer you need a good one

graphics card - some are integrated with mother board others arent. it displays the desktop on a monitor. games require graphics cards to do complex calculations to make realistic images. this is why you need a good one for games. a graphics card is almost a computer by itself.

processor - is like a fast calculator. the faster the better. it has things called caches which are super fast bits of ram built into them. there are usually 2 levels of cache. the more cache the better.

psu - this supplys power to the components. the more components and the faster/bigger components typically require more power so you need a more powerful psu.

other things are extra like tv cards, etc. hope this helps.
banned#8
ricko
Does your PC work Magic_monkey ?? I mean with only 3 items in the case :-)


its not a pc its a mac

mac rule
#9
danby jason
its not a pc its a mac

mac rule


I'm not going to dispute that but ricko did have a point.
Even though it is a mac, it still has more than a HD, RAM and a Graphics Card lol
#10
http://www.pcguide.com/ is facinating in parts, although slightly out of date now.
#11
Thanks for all the help guys, rep given for most of ya, will try and rep more of you soon :)

Can anyone answer my question which is " What is it that actually prdocues the best graphics?" I know it is obviously the graphics card, but what else is needed to get those graphics up to an amazing standard?

For example in the PS3 and 360 what components are used to make the graphics so crisp and clear (Also are the same type of components used to make graphics in a PC?)
#12
In my opinion If it's wanted for playing games, I'd recommend giving up before you start, Console games are designed for specific hardware, with PC's gamers always end up chasing new technology to get the best out of new games, the standard for graphics cards at the minute seems to be at least 512MB GDDR3 for smooth play on newish titles
#13
glenncraneuk;1938600
Thanks for all the help guys, rep given for most of ya, will try and rep more of you soon :)

Can anyone answer my question which is " What is it that actually prdocues the best graphics?" I know it is obviously the graphics card, but what else is needed to get those graphics up to an amazing standard?

For example in the PS3 and 360 what components are used to make the graphics so crisp and clear (Also are the same type of components used to make graphics in a PC?)


The gaming graphics are mostly done by the graphics card, which contains both circuitry needed to send signals to the display and more importantly a processor which basically calculates what colour to draw each pixel.

What graphics card you need depends on the monitor size you use, what games you play and finally what your budget is (as a larger monitor will have more pixels thus more to process by the gpu). To have really 'crisp' graphics (smooth straight lines) graphics cards can do special post-processing known as anti-aliasing and also post-filtering known as anisotropic filtering; these require multiple calculations for each pixel adding to the processing requirements (and memory requirements) again.

So basically the more powerful the graphics card you buy, the higher the overall image quality will generally be as you can opt to use higher in-game quality settings, screen resolutions and post-processing options whilst still getting a similar 'playable' framerate. Obviously the more powerful cards tend to have faster, larger GPUs (and consequentially cost more, use more power and run hotter/noisier...)

In addition, you need the rest of the computer to be fast enough (if you have a very fast graphics card and a slow CPU the games will become CPU bound...), a decent monitor (older TFTs were prone to blurring due to slow response times, digital interface (DVI) usually produces higher image quality as the signal remains digital all the way to the monitor) and a case/power supply combination the provides both adequate power and cooling (something Microsoft failed to do with the 360 to their cost!).
#14
[FONT="Comic Sans MS"][/FONT]
I use [url]www.answersthatwork.com[/url] -

Software answers and PC tips
Hardware problems
Configuration solutions
Networking tips
General computer tips
Recommendations Drivers
Boot disks and Boot CDs
Software downloads
Our famous Task List
ISP email settings
PC Tune Up and PC Performance

marvellous!
#15
glenncraneuk
Can anyone answer my question which is " What is it that actually prdocues the best graphics?" I know it is obviously the graphics card, but what else is needed to get those graphics up to an amazing standard?


Two things mainly:

1. The source. The picture/movie/game etc. has to be excellent quality to start with.

2. The monitor. Although LCDs are a very practical way of displaying stuff they've still got numerous problems when it comes to reproducing the real world. Different monitors have noticibly different image quality, even within the same price.

The graphics card doesn't actually have that much effect on image quality in itself. They do certain types of processing to improve an image, especially on LCDs, but there isn't much difference between different cards.

Games aren't like movies. Movies are just a series of recorded pictures that play one after the other but as games allow you to move about freely this approch would be impossible there, storing pictures for every viewpoint and angle would take up far too much space. Instead games specify the geometry of the world and what items look like and the graphics card has to calculate which items block you from seeing other items and more recently all sorts of other effects like what angle the shadow falls from the current position of the sun and where the dust from your spinning car wheels goes.

Games generally include multiple settings with the higher ones being more complicated (more blades of grass, more particles of dust, shadows from other light sources as well) and the more expensive cards provide more calculation power so these higher settings can be calculated quickly enough to play.

In general for the best graphics you need an excellent source (Hi-def movies, high resolution pictures) and the best monitor you can afford. The latest graphics card tech (something like an HD3450 if you're not gaming) and a hardware calibrator for the monitor will help you get a little bit more.

You'll also need the supporting hardware, for HD movies this will be a decent CPU to do the decoding and for games this will be a decent CPU, enough memory and a graphics card good enough to process the game at it's highest settings.
#16
Ok whilst im here, can i have the basic info...if possible....of the difference between ATI and NVidia (They are the two major players in graphics cards right?)

Just need the basics!

Also more rep added :)
#17
The differences mainly depend on whether you're looking at integrated graphics or discrete cards and which particular cards you're looking at. Across the whole range the biggest difference is probably that ATI supports crossfire and multiple monitors while nVidia doesn't (yet, although they've said they'll update the drivers to add it)..

Post a Comment

You don't need an account to leave a comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!