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Consumer rights - returning products

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I recently bought a TV and having second thoughts about it now. I really should have gone for the freeview HD model. Would I still be able to return the TV to the retailer I bought it from even if the…
Civic EG6 Avatar
6y, 4m agoPosted 6 years, 4 months ago
I recently bought a TV and having second thoughts about it now. I really should have gone for the freeview HD model. Would I still be able to return the TV to the retailer I bought it from even if the product has no faults?

Thanks
Civic EG6 Avatar
6y, 4m agoPosted 6 years, 4 months ago
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#1
Was the TV bought online or in a shop?
#2
Yep it was bought online via amazon, can it be returned even if its taken out of the box?

Basic returns policy: If for any reason you are unhappy with your purchase, you can return it to us in its original condition within 30 days of the date you received the item, unopened (with any seals and shrink-wrap intact) and we will issue a full refund for the price you paid for the item.

The bolded sentence is no longer the case as I took the manual out of the plastic bag.
#3
Yeah you can still return it. Under UK consumer law, all orders you make online come with a 'cooling off' period - law stipulates this to be at least 7 days - some retailers may give you longer. Amazon's 30 day unopened return policy is in addition to your statutory rights, so the 7 day cooling off period still applies. This is an unconditional right - so you can still return it even if you have opened the instruction booklet. You will, however, be responsible for the cost of returning it back to Amazon.
#4
Isn't it 7days unopened though?
#5
dcx_badass
matt3454
Isn't it 7days unopened though?

Yes.


No, it isn't.
You are allowed to open the item, and still have the right to return it under consumer law.

The Distance Selling Regulation was introduced to give customers the right to inspect the products they have bought themselves, as they would be able to do if they had it physically in front of them in a shop. This right of inspection includes removing the item from the box.
Else, what is the point of having regulation that allows customers to return the item, having stared at the front of the cardboard box for 7 days?
#6
Even if you are allowed to open it you still have to pay to send it back as far as I know.
#7
dcx_badass
gratts
dcx_badass
matt3454
Isn't it 7days unopened though?
Yes.
No, it isn't.You are allowed to open the item, and still have the right to return it under consumer law.The Distance Selling Regulation was introduced to give customers the right to inspect the products they have bought themselves, as they would be able to do if they had it physically in front of them in a shop. This right of inspection includes removing the item from the box. Else, what is the point of having regulation that allows customers to return the item, having stared at the front of the cardboard box for 7 days?

So businesses get destroyed because they have to sell 'second hand' opened items for a massive amount less because some idiot couldn't make up their mind. I agree it is good in some situations, but things like this take the **** and risk businesses survivability


Yep, I agree with you. That part of the law does seem quite heavily weighted towards the consumer. Having said that from my experience in retail, most manufacturers are quite willing to issue shops credits for goods even if they're not technically faulty. Though I suppose you could argue that all that does is pass the risk from the retailer to the manufacturer.
#8
[/quote]
So businesses get destroyed because they have to sell 'second hand' opened items for a massive amount less because some idiot couldn't make up their mind. I agree it is good in some situations, but things like this take the **** and risk businesses survivability[/quote]

+1
#9
Yes, several online retaillers have gone under because of this and other parts of the sale of goods act. It is basically seen as a retailers own choice / risk to go into distance selling business.

It does protect the consumer but, like all laws, it gets abused.
#10
Call them and ask?
#11
Consumer Direct - 08454 04 05 06 or website http://www.consumerdirect.gov.uk/
#12
Consumer Law states that you are allowed to open the item and 'inspect' before you make you mind up to keep it. As long as you do not damage the item in any way and that all packaging in still intact then you will have no problems. Obviously by 'as new' they mean no finger prints all over it and signs of use. Amazon are second to none with their returns so i would just ring them and say its not what you expected.

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