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Cost of University?

Goofeys Girl Avatar
5y, 8m agoPosted 5 years, 8 months ago
I noticed on the news this morning Leeds Met Uni are putting their fees up to £8500 per year so it will not be just the likes of Oxford and Cambridge with high fees.
As someone who is only just thinking of University fees as my oldest is 15 can someone tell me what the cost is actually for is it purely the tuition?
I presume lodgings are on top as of that as would be the obvious food, transport costs etc and not forgetting beer money.
I have not googled or anything as yet so please forgive my ignorance I am just starting to try and figure out how it will all be possible.
We are an average family so wont get any help I just wondered what it would all come to. I know it will be my sons debt and his younger brother a couple of years later but trying to work out how we can help reduce his burden of debt. Other than of course not going.
Thanks in advance.
Goofeys Girl Avatar
5y, 8m agoPosted 5 years, 8 months ago
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#1
That's only tuition costs. As you said you'll have to then factor in digs, food, books and the ran-dan. Our daughter costs approx £500 for that over and above tuition fees.
banned#2
£8500 makes me laugh, did they not dare put them to £8999?
#3
I am doing a degree there at the moment but it is only costing £100
#4
Just bear in mind that you will only start to pay back once you earn over a certain amount.
As jakeystyle has said, its only just tuition costs and so there are other fees to consider.

There are already more than a handful of unis announcing the full £9000 fees. I guess Leeds didnt want to be in the same league as them.
#5
I do wonder where all the sudden increase in fees is actually going. Will the students have more lectures etc, I doubt it.
#6
I think it is also a ploy by the university. ie we charge more because we are better than others....
#7
Goofeys Girl
I do wonder where all the sudden increase in fees is actually going. Will the students have more lectures etc, I doubt it.


Nope, and universities are making loads of redundancies.
banned#8
how we can help reduce his burden of debt


by helping him with his CV and encouraging him to get a part time job now and continue it through his studies.
#9
Goofeys Girl
I do wonder where all the sudden increase in fees is actually going. Will the students have more lectures etc, I doubt it.


I read that because of government funding cuts, the deficit of universities have to cover this from elsewhere. The increase in uni fees would help to cut their deficit.
So my take is that the increase in fees will make either no difference in terms of quality, or (likely only for those charging £9000 max) some kind of reduction.
#10
bykergrove
how we can help reduce his burden of debt

by helping him with his CV and encouraging him to get a part time job now and continue it through his studies.

Well thats depends on the course they are doing doesn't it, might not necessarily be able to carry on working through their studies.
#11
Brownrooster
bykergrove
how we can help reduce his burden of debt


by helping him with his CV and encouraging him to get a part time job now and continue it through his studies.


Well thats depends on the course they are doing doesn't it, might not necessarily be able to carry on working through their studies.


Vast majority of degrees people can carry on working. I worked 20+ hours per week whilst at uni, as did my brother and sister.
1 Like #12
Increasing student fees will also take away all the students that go for the experience of uni and do a course in media studies or international relations where they are only actually in lectures for 5 hours a week.
#13
stewby
Brownrooster
bykergrove
how we can help reduce his burden of debt

by helping him with his CV and encouraging him to get a part time job now and continue it through his studies.

Well thats depends on the course they are doing doesn't it, might not necessarily be able to carry on working through their studies.

Vast majority of degrees people can carry on working. I worked 20+ hours per week whilst at uni, as did my brother and sister.

I refer to my last comment. The lady who posted this comment hasn't said what course her children will be doing so you can't just throw a comment saying keep them working.

My girlfriend is studying medicine and is in Uni 9-5 most days some days later, then comes home and has to study/revise/do assignments until late in the evenings.


Edited By: Brownrooster on Mar 28, 2011 14:46
#14
absolutely agree bykergrove, they will both have to find money themselves by doing some part time work whilst at Uni.
I do think its wrong that it should have interest on the loan as well. Not sure that everyone appreciates that, I certainly didn't until I saw a news item about it.
#15
Brownrooster
stewby
Brownrooster
bykergrove
how we can help reduce his burden of debt


by helping him with his CV and encouraging him to get a part time job now and continue it through his studies.


Well thats depends on the course they are doing doesn't it, might not necessarily be able to carry on working through their studies.


Vast majority of degrees people can carry on working. I worked 20+ hours per week whilst at uni, as did my brother and sister.


I refer to my last comment. The lady who osted this comment hasn't said what course her children will be doing so you can't just throw a comment saying keep them working.

My girlfriend is studying medicine and is in Uni 9-5 most days some day later then comes home and has to study/revise/do assignments until late in the evenings.


Medicine is quite different to most degrees though. Op was asking for ideas about making uni affordable, one was given. Up to op to decide if idea is feasible. I would also suggest living at home whilst at uni if it is feasible as saves a fortune


Edited By: stewby on Mar 28, 2011 14:48
banned 1 Like #16
Brownrooster
bykergrove
how we can help reduce his burden of debt


by helping him with his CV and encouraging him to get a part time job now and continue it through his studies.


Well thats depends on the course they are doing doesn't it, might not necessarily be able to carry on working through their studies.



well he can work until he starts uni and if he is doing such a course then he can quit. but his debt would be lower than if he spent that time playing COD. and he'll have better social skills thrown in for free.
#17
Sorry Brown Rooster it took me ages to type didnt see your answers I wasnt being rude.
I think you're right it definitely does depend what course.
I just hope my son decides to do something where there will be a job at the end of it. Only this week an article in the newspaper mentioned that 1000's of young adults over the last few years have been doing forensics courses, partly due to the tv programmes and there are just not the jobs out there. Its all very sad.
I believe medicine is one of the things we need to push. I wish the government would help kids wanting to do medicine, engineering etc with subsidies. Those are the jobs we need and want.
#18
I agree with what you're saying to get them working that can only be a good thing. Personally I think university is saturated with people now that come out with degrees in fields that are already overflowing with people trying to find jobs and often the degree is quite worthless, as alot of my friends have found out. I would say unless they were going to do a degree that was pretty much guaranteed a job at the end of it that is well paid it's not worth it. Although the economy is how it is I think apprenticeships are the way forward. Learn a skill and you can usually earn, when fully qualified more than someone with a degree and not have thousands of pounds worth of debt. 'Just for the experience' of Uni.

Edited By: Brownrooster on Mar 28, 2011 14:53
#19
just for the record - im currently at uni, staying at home and doing part time work as well. Its not unusual to see uni students rent out for first year "just for the experience", then staying at home for the rest of the degree. Its also common to see them doing part time or voluntary work.

Also, If im lucky, i would finally gain an internship over the summer, something else to put down on the cv apart from my part time job.
#20
Brownrooster
I agree with what you're saying to get them working that can only be a good thing. Personally I think university is saturated with people now that come out with degrees in fields that are already overflowing with people trying to find jobs and often the degree is quite worthless, as alot of my friends have found out. I would say unless they were going to do a degree that was pretty much guaranteed a job at the end of it that is well paid it's not worth it. Although the economy is how it is I think apprenticeships are the way forward. Learn a skill and you can earn usually when fully qualified more than someone with a degree and not have thousands of pounds worth of debt. 'Just for the experience' of Uni.


Was having the same conversation a few days ago. Degrees that offer a genuine route into employment will survive, others won't. Apprenticeships are the way forward but the college I work at is finding it hard to find willing employers. Some employers see training staff as using time thus hitting productivity.I know of garages where the staff refuse to train apprentices as they miss out on bonuses. I can see more companies offering sponsorship for degrees to enure they get the best graduates with the right training.
#21
Absolutely agree, my son wants to be a physiotherapist so needs the degree. He will be going into the family business if he wants so there will be a job but a lot of his friends want to do the same and the NHS is cutting back so where will they all go. It would take them ages to set up by themselves so I can see many ending up doing a completely different job. What a awful waste.
We must look at what we need in the future and try and advice young adults which way to go. I agree for many it would be apprenticeships but the little I know they are almost extinct or not worth what they used to be.
Without sounding too old fashioned I actually think we have told children for too long they can do anything they want without being realistic. Lets face it how many marine biologist actually come from a council estate in Leeds. Not many I wouldn't have thought.
#22
Goofeys Girl
Absolutely agree, my son wants to be a physiotherapist so needs the degree. He will be going into the family business if he wants so there will be a job but a lot of his friends want to do the same and the NHS is cutting back so where will they all go. It would take them ages to set up by themselves so I can see many ending up doing a completely different job. What a awful waste.
We must look at what we need in the future and try and advice young adults which way to go. I agree for many it would be apprenticeships but the little I know they are almost extinct or not worth what they used to be.
Without sounding too old fashioned I actually think we have told children for too long they can do anything they want without being realistic. Lets face it how many marine biologist actually come from a council estate in Leeds. Not many I wouldn't have thought.


Leeds met is great for physiotherapy I believe. Do tuition fees vary from course to course or is it a flat rate for all courses at that particular uni?
banned#23
Brownrooster
I agree with what you're saying to get them working that can only be a good thing. Personally I think university is saturated with people now that come out with degrees in fields that are already overflowing with people trying to find jobs and often the degree is quite worthless, as alot of my friends have found out. I would say unless they were going to do a degree that was pretty much guaranteed a job at the end of it that is well paid it's not worth it. Although the economy is how it is I think apprenticeships are the way forward. Learn a skill and you can usually earn, when fully qualified more than someone with a degree and not have thousands of pounds worth of debt. 'Just for the experience' of Uni.



Genius post. Apprenticeships are getting more and more focus these days. and there is a demand for these skilled professions. Science and Medicine are in demand too but people these days want to do fuddy duddy subjects and cry when they can't get a job.
#24
I have a friend that left Uni last year as a qualified physiotherapist and have just got a job 2 months ago after working as a clerk in a bank for nearly a year.
It must be frustrating to spend 3 years+ and then end up in a job you could have gone in straight from school, but unfortunately thats what is happening more and more. The recession obviously not helping the situation with employers wanting people with some many years experience in the chosen area as they can afford to be picky!
#25
Leeds met is great for physiotherapy I believe. Do tuition fees vary from course to course or is it a flat rate for all courses at that particular uni?[/quote]

Thanks Stewby. He only does his GCSE's next year but with the cost involved you really have to start thinking about it all.
I think in years to come we will be like the Americans putting money away for the college fund. Wish I had thought of that 15 years ago!
banned#26
Brownrooster
I have a friend that left Uni last year as a qualified physiotherapist and have just got a job 2 months ago after working as a clerk in a bank for nearly a year.
It must be frustrating to spend 3 years+ and then end up in a job you could have gone in straight from school, but unfortunately thats what is happening more and more. The recession obviously not helping the situation with employers wanting people with some many years experience in the chosen area as they can afford to be picky!


The problem with job saturation was about before the recession, the recession just made it worse. We have a skill shortage and even in the recession we're paying for doctors and GPs to come from other countries to work here because we don't produce enough of our own.
1 Like #27
These students eh, £8,500 per year is like that to make sure that you want to do the course and not like this stupid people who study philosophy or media studies and think they will get a job with that. My first job paid me £4.25 an hour 5 years later im on £26k - No degree jsut GCSE's got to start at the bottom im afraid....If you can't afford to go you DONT, thats life !!

Edited By: dandoc2 on Mar 28, 2011 15:15
#28
dandoc2
These students eh, £8,500 per year is like that to make sure that you want to do the course and not like this stupid people who study philosophy or media studies and think they will get a job with that. My first job paid me £4.25 an hour 5 years later im on £26k - No degree jsut GCSE's got to start at the bottom im afraid....If you can't afford to go you DONT, thats life !!

not really.... if you dont earn enough you dont pay it back. This will make no difference to peoples ability to afford university. All you have to pay for is food, lodging, etc and maybe books if you dont wish to borrow them.
#29
Im at Manchester, was just informed the other day that ours is going up to £9000 in 2012/2013 year.

I currently pay around £3,300 and to be honest, after all the job interviews, assessment centres etc. I am starting to think that paid too much, never mind £9000 a year, its probably more worth just working from the bottom up.

By the way, I have had a part time job all the way through college, and uni. 14 hours a week, as well as finding summer jobs, it is almost always possible to work extra to uni
#30
manc80

not really.... if you dont earn enough you dont pay it back. This will make no difference to peoples ability to afford university. All you have to pay for is food, lodging, etc and maybe books if you dont wish to borrow them.


How long will it take until you will not beable to get the student loans, for degrees which will never guarantee a return of payment in that job sector, that's the worry.
banned#31
Brownrooster
I agree with what you're saying to get them working that can only be a good thing. Personally I think university is saturated with people now that come out with degrees in fields that are already overflowing with people trying to find jobs and often the degree is quite worthless, as alot of my friends have found out. I would say unless they were going to do a degree that was pretty much guaranteed a job at the end of it that is well paid it's not worth it. Although the economy is how it is I think apprenticeships are the way forward. Learn a skill and you can usually earn, when fully qualified more than someone with a degree and not have thousands of pounds worth of debt. 'Just for the experience' of Uni.


What a thoroughly depressing thing to read.
#32
£8,500 per year x 3 = £25,500. Wow that amount of debt saddled round your neck at such a young age is nuts, not even touching on possible student overdrafts, credit cards or other expenses.
#33
FilthAndFurry
Brownrooster
I agree with what you're saying to get them working that can only be a good thing. Personally I think university is saturated with people now that come out with degrees in fields that are already overflowing with people trying to find jobs and often the degree is quite worthless, as alot of my friends have found out. I would say unless they were going to do a degree that was pretty much guaranteed a job at the end of it that is well paid it's not worth it. Although the economy is how it is I think apprenticeships are the way forward. Learn a skill and you can usually earn, when fully qualified more than someone with a degree and not have thousands of pounds worth of debt. 'Just for the experience' of Uni.

What a thoroughly depressing thing to read.


But true. 9k a year for three years minimum and then going into a job that has nothing to do with the degree you have just paid 27k to go through. Then you dont start paying that money back until you are earning over 21k or whatever it is now and still have that debt 20 years later because they only take about £50 a month (dependant on pay)

Edited By: Brownrooster on Mar 28, 2011 15:47
#34
Being an international student, I paid £11k for 1year masters program. It took me morethan 3yrs to pay back the loan.
#35
Tuition fees will be covered by loans, but depending on your income living costs may not. I get my tuition fee loan, and a maintenance loan that doesn't even cover my accommodation - let alone food, books, going out etc. Ridiculous. We should all get the same. I know one person in my flat who gets the max grants and has so much spare cash. His loans/grants give £100+ a week - after paying accommodation. Feel sorry for those who have to pay £9,000 a year. My brother is in that category, but fortunately my parents are in a position where they can ensure we both leave uni with the same level of debt.

As for 'you don't have to pay it back until you earn approx £20,000', if you don't earn that much then you shouldn't have bothered with a degree.


Edited By: emhaslam on Mar 28, 2011 17:43: .
#36
I can't remember how much interest it was but it was quite a chunk extra on top of the possible £27 K.
All at a time when young adults will be wanting to start looking at getting a house!
Its not a debt I would want to have.
#37
you could buy a fake degree for much less
1 Like #38
Try £8500.97 ... clearance price!

master_chief
£8500 makes me laugh, did they not dare put them to £8999?
#39
You may be interested in something like this.......

World Leading
Dutch higher education is a world leader in areas like business administration, agricultural studies, civil engineering, medicine, remote sensing and arts & design.

Value for Money
Education in Holland is not free, but tuition fees are reasonable compared to other countries. In Holland, higher education is subsidized, which means that tuition fees can be kept relatively low, especially compared with the United Kingdom and the United States.

Tuition Fees
The annual tuition fees for enrolment in a degree programme or course at a Dutch higher education institution start at approximately €1,620 for EU students. The costs of programmes or courses for non-EU students are generally higher.

http://www.internationalgraduate.net/country/europe/netherlands.htm

Many courses are apparently taught in English

But if you were to go down that route I would suggest contacting the university direct rather than going through a 3rd party, unless they are actually recommended personally by the university.

Edited By: WoolyM on Mar 28, 2011 19:13: .
#40
If I had my time again, I would have worked my **** off to get a good job and get them to pay for my course.

The fact you could be £25000 in debt just in tution fees for a 3 year course is ridiculous. Hopefully though it should eliminate the stupid courses out there

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