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Dame Sally Davies comment on BBC News

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Reading about the Ebola Screenings procedures being reviewd in the UK after the Nurse was diagnoised I was surprised at what Dame Sally Davies apparently said. Here is the snippet Dame Sally sai…
Standi Avatar
2y, 2m agoPosted 2 years, 2 months ago
Reading about the Ebola Screenings procedures being reviewd in the UK after the Nurse was diagnoised I was surprised at what Dame Sally Davies apparently said.

Here is the snippet

Dame Sally said Ms Cafferkey had been in the early phase of the disease when she made the journey to the UK from Sierra Leone, via Casablanca, and her fellow passengers were at "very low risk" of being infected.

She told BBC Breakfast: "The public health risk is negligible - Ebola's very difficult to catch."

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Standi Avatar
2y, 2m agoPosted 2 years, 2 months ago
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#1
#2
Standi
oO
#3
What part of it surprised you?
#4
teh arn
What part of it surprised you?

I was surprised by her saying "Ebola's very difficult to catch"

I know its simple to prevent yourself being infected but to suggest its hard to catch is a bit misleading. Allot of doctors and nurses have died from ebola knowing how its spread and what they needed to do to prevent getting infected.
There was even 2 nurses in America who caught it while wearing protective clothing (possibly due to 1 mistake)
3 Likes #5
Standi
teh arn
What part of it surprised you?

I was surprised by her saying "Ebola's very difficult to catch"

I know its simple to prevent yourself being infected but to suggest its hard to catch is a bit misleading. Allot of doctors and nurses have died from ebola knowing how its spread and what they needed to do to prevent getting infected.
There was even 2 nurses in America who caught it while wearing protective clothing (possibly due to 1 mistake)

It is quite hard to catch though?
Those in the medical profession are going to be more likely to get it because they'll be in contact with it day in day out.
#6
with all the safe practices put in place, how the hec do these people get into the country in the first place?
1 Like #7
It is hard to catch , in the early stages virtually impossible . IMO a very measured factual interview , unlike some of the Press coverage .
1 Like #8
https://40.media.tumblr.com/1d326e03af97a0ce0ac9ab532e42a52c/tumblr_n0hvj5Yjno1qkuou9o1_500.jpg:)
#9
teh arn
Standi
teh arn
What part of it surprised you?

I was surprised by her saying "Ebola's very difficult to catch"

I know its simple to prevent yourself being infected but to suggest its hard to catch is a bit misleading. Allot of doctors and nurses have died from ebola knowing how its spread and what they needed to do to prevent getting infected.
There was even 2 nurses in America who caught it while wearing protective clothing (possibly due to 1 mistake)

It is quite hard to catch though?
Those in the medical profession are going to be more likely to get it because they'll be in contact with it day in day out.

I think the "It is not spread through the air" is rather misleading.
It is possible, and not proven either way, it can be spread by somebody coughing and the droplets landing on another person.

So whilst not "air-borne", it may "spread through the air".... Bit misleading.

Confusion arises here:

The CDC has replaced the document describing the difference between airborne infections and ones that spread via droplet. A key change is that the airborne section stresses that airborne germs "can be inhaled even after the original person is no longer nearby." Droplet germs, by contrast, "travel shorter distances, less than about 6 feet from a source patient." Ebola is the latter type of germ.

Edited By: Firefly1 on Dec 31, 2014 12:29
1 Like #10
This woman is a hero, she is truly courageous, she risked her own life to save others...the risk is very low.

Ebola is transmitted through direct contact with bodily fluids – such as blood, vomit or faeces – of an infected person while they are showing symptoms. The risk of Ebola being passed from an individual before they developed symptoms is extremely low.
#11
davewave
This woman is a hero, she is truly courageous, she risked her own life to save others...the risk is very low.Ebola is transmitted through direct contact with bodily fluids – such as blood, vomit or faeces – of an infected person while they are showing symptoms. The risk of Ebola being passed from an individual before they developed symptoms is extremely low.

I agree with that I just think its poor wording saying its very difficult to catch. The nurse probably got infected by either a small mistake on her part, her protective gear wasnt up to the job or any number of small things that left her exposed however briefly. It shows the virus iteself isn't hard to catch only in the initial stages.

Its possibly a case of me taking what she said out of context but i still think its a poor choice of words.
#12
davewave
This woman is a hero, she is truly courageous, she risked her own life to save others...the risk is very low.

Ebola is transmitted through direct contact with bodily fluids – such as blood, vomit or faeces – of an infected person while they are showing symptoms. The risk of Ebola being passed from an individual before they developed symptoms is extremely low.

She believed she had a fever, before she got into the plane. Hence they took her temperature seven times. Whilst it was reported as normal, the feeling of a fever (pyrexia) is a symptom in itself. Therefore you can argue she was already symptomatic and therefore contagious. However as long as no-one on the plane had contact with her bodily fluids (including droplets!), then they should be fine.

Edited By: Firefly1 on Dec 31, 2014 15:24
#13
Firefly1
davewave
This woman is a hero, she is truly courageous, she risked her own life to save others...the risk is very low.

Ebola is transmitted through direct contact with bodily fluids – such as blood, vomit or faeces – of an infected person while they are showing symptoms. The risk of Ebola being passed from an individual before they developed symptoms is extremely low.

She believed she had a fever, before she got into the plane. Hence they took her temperature seven times. Whilst it was reported as normal, the feeling of a fever (pyrexia) is a symptom in itself. Therefore you can argue she was already symptomatic and therefore contagious. However as long as no-one on the plane had contact with her bodily fluids (including droplets!), then they should be fine.

She believed she had a fever, before she got into the plane

If that's the case why take any risk. Yes she's a brave lady and deserves the respect for what she has done but for the sake of a few days in isolation before being flown back to the UK would, in my honest opinion, have been the better option.

I'm all for her receiving the best care/treatment possible but with all the Health & Safety procedures and the "nanny state" why was she allowed to travel...if there was any doubt?
#14
Its can't really survive long in the colder climates we have here, and on planes, that's also why the risk is low
#15
philphil61
Firefly1
davewave
This woman is a hero, she is truly courageous, she risked her own life to save others...the risk is very low.

Ebola is transmitted through direct contact with bodily fluids – such as blood, vomit or faeces – of an infected person while they are showing symptoms. The risk of Ebola being passed from an individual before they developed symptoms is extremely low.

She believed she had a fever, before she got into the plane. Hence they took her temperature seven times. Whilst it was reported as normal, the feeling of a fever (pyrexia) is a symptom in itself. Therefore you can argue she was already symptomatic and therefore contagious. However as long as no-one on the plane had contact with her bodily fluids (including droplets!), then they should be fine.

She believed she had a fever, before she got into the plane

If that's the case why take any risk. Yes she's a brave lady and deserves the respect for what she has done but for the sake of a few days in isolation before being flown back to the UK would, in my honest opinion, have been the better option.

I'm all for her receiving the best care/treatment possible but with all the Health & Safety procedures and the "nanny state" why was she allowed to travel...if there was any doubt?

Well, according to the sketchy details, she reported the fever @ Heathrow - so we don't know whether she only just felt feeling ill there (or before she got on the plane from abroad).
Either way, I agree - she should not have been transported anyway from Heathrow after she has just explained she returned from West Africa treating Ebola victims. A blood test should have been taken (in my opinion) at this point & confirmed the diagnosis - or excluded it and for her to be let on her way.

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