Deeds on a house... - HotUKDeals
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Deeds on a house...

JonnyTwoToes Avatar
banned6y, 2m agoPosted 6 years, 2 months ago
...OK, since starting the 'When did you buy your house' thread (which was very interesting by the way!), something has occurred to me.

I always thought that deeds were handed over on mortgage completion? Well we got ours when we moved in because our solicitor said the HSBC handed got the storage room.
Is this now the norm?

Or can we stop paying the mortgage, lock ourselves in and show the debt collectors or deeds through the letterbox?
JonnyTwoToes Avatar
banned6y, 2m agoPosted 6 years, 2 months ago
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Comments/page:
#1
a lot of mortgage companies destroy the deeds now. As long as its registered land you don't need em
#2
Paper Deeds not so important now, all on computer last few years
#3
Working for a company that deals with the uk land registry, not a simple as I don't owe money it says so on your charge information, once repaid that changes and charge information no longer applies. All electronic of course.
banned#4
Ahhh, that makes sense - thanks for the replies.

Be a great shame to destroy these things though - my house dates back to 1860 and the deeds are a work of art! Might frame them and put them around the house then.

Thanks again!
[mod]#5
The new Land Registration Act says that all titles should be registered at HMLR. You will get a discount for a compulsory registration but if you instructed a solicitor for a transaction, and your property is unregistered, the solicitor will register the property.

Deeds are only important if your property doesnt have a Title Number.
banned#6
magicjay1986
The new Land Registration Act says that all titles should be registered at HMLR. You will get a discount for a compulsory registration but if you instructed a solicitor for a transaction, and your property is unregistered, the solicitor will register the property.

Deeds are only important if your property doesnt have a Title Number.


Cool. Cheers for the info!
[mod]#7
JonnyTwoToes
magicjay1986
The new Land Registration Act says that all titles should be registered at HMLR. You will get a discount for a compulsory registration but if you instructed a solicitor for a transaction, and your property is unregistered, the solicitor will register the property.

Deeds are only important if your property doesnt have a Title Number.


Cool. Cheers for the info!


You are right though, some of the documents are awesome. Especially the Indentures or very old Conveyances.

When I was training I used to have to go through the deeds and put them in a order to show the "root of title" from the first owners to the last. You wouldn't believe how many flea bites I used to get!!
banned#8
magicjay1986
JonnyTwoToes
magicjay1986
The new Land Registration Act says that all titles should be registered at HMLR. You will get a discount for a compulsory registration but if you instructed a solicitor for a transaction, and your property is unregistered, the solicitor will register the property.

Deeds are only important if your property doesnt have a Title Number.


Cool. Cheers for the info!


You are right though, some of the documents are awesome. Especially the Indentures or very old Conveyances.

When I was training I used to have to go through the deeds and put them in a order to show the "root of title" from the first owners to the last. You wouldn't believe how many flea bites I used to get!!


Ah man, ours came in an old brown envelope and everything was chronological. Our house was the first on the street and stayed that way for 40 years. - everywhere else is labeled as 'sandpit'!
Great artwork and calligraphy! I should have bought back in 1910 though - would have cost about a quid!
Something to show the grand kids I guess.
banned#9
If you bought it in 1910 you would be dead now...
banned#10
tangramman
If you bought it in 1910 you would be dead now...


That was actually part of the joke. But thanks for playing! :D
#11
I had a house built in the early 1900's and a covenant on the deeds was that I was not allowed to put a shooting gallery or fairground ride in my garden..... you cant risk losing that kind of information!
#12
When we moved in June our solicitor gave us the deeds to our new house dating back to the early 1800's, wax sealed and everything, i asked him why he or the mortgage company didnt keep them he said they have them stored on computers, and the land registry have the information to prove you own the land.

i thought it was lovely getting the deeds from the day the house was built in 1800's and to see how many people owned it, its amazing information
banned#13
mosskeeto
I had a house built in the early 1900's and a covenant on the deeds was that I was not allowed to put a shooting gallery or fairground ride in my garden..... you cant risk losing that kind of information!


Ours is from 1930, no live stock, no shops and says the original land owner must be paid £10 per year...no one pays it though as they don't know who it is.
#14
We bought our current house in 2000 and got the deeds then, as you say there just amazing, built in 1936 and was bought by the local cobbler, we have just sold our house and had to give them to the buyers.

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