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Diesel or Petrol?

JonnyTwoToes Avatar
banned5y, 7m agoPosted 5 years, 7 months ago
Getting a new car in the next month or so (yes, another fabulous Mini - Countryman this time).

I was looking at the Cooper Diesel. I've always had petrol.

Anybody drive a diesel that would recommend it over a petrol?
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JonnyTwoToes Avatar
banned5y, 7m agoPosted 5 years, 7 months ago
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1 Like #1
It depends on your mileage.

Diesels (if you factor in the extra purchase cost etc) tend to be cheaper to run if you do 10k miles a year or more roughly.

If the actual purchase price is similar (the example above was based on diesels being a couple of grand more expensive) between the 2, then with Diesel only being on average 3/4p more expensive its cheaper to run on pretty much most mileage.

I went from a 1.6 petrol to 1.8 diesel and the mileage I get out of the diesel is a good 15 MPG better a month.

Personally, I would buy the diesel as it suits my lifesyle much better.
#2
cooking oil ftw
#3
got approx 300 miles for a petrol Kia, traded in for a 1.9 TDi astra, only getting about 100 miles extra to the tank, do a lot of town driving, so unles it's motorway driving i would avoid.
banned#4
RedDev11
It depends on your mileage.

Diesels (if you factor in the extra purchase cost etc) tend to be cheaper to run if you do 10k miles a year or more roughly.

If the actual purchase price is similar (the example above was based on diesels being a couple of grand more expensive) between the 2, then with Diesel only being on average 3/4p more expensive its cheaper to run on pretty much most mileage.

I went from a 1.6 petrol to 1.8 diesel and the mileage I get out of the diesel is a good 15 MPG better a month.

Personally, I would buy the diesel as it suits my lifesyle much better.


The other half will be using it mostly - about 10k a year on average.

I read that you're best to drive a few long journeys with high engine performance to clear filters in the engine? Ever heard of that?
banned#5
boabbyrab
got approx 300 miles for a petrol Kia, traded in for a 1.9 TDi astra, only getting about 100 miles extra to the tank, do a lot of town driving, so unles it's motorway driving i would avoid.


100 miles extra? That's rather good isn't it?
#6
not really, when you go from £40 odd to £60 odd to fill it, had a corsa diesel about 10 years ago and done a lot of motorway miles and got approx 500 - 550 miles to a tank
1 Like #7
diesel vs petrol calculator.
link
banned#8
boabbyrab
not really, when you go from £40 odd to £60 odd to fill it, had a corsa diesel about 10 years ago and done a lot of motorway miles and got approx 500 - 550 miles to a tank


To be honest, the convertible is pretty crap in terms of mileage anyway so I think this will be better.

Just wondered if there is a reason I've not thought of as to why I should/shouldn't opt for diesel over petrol.
1 Like #9
JonnyTwoToes
RedDev11
It depends on your mileage.

Diesels (if you factor in the extra purchase cost etc) tend to be cheaper to run if you do 10k miles a year or more roughly.

If the actual purchase price is similar (the example above was based on diesels being a couple of grand more expensive) between the 2, then with Diesel only being on average 3/4p more expensive its cheaper to run on pretty much most mileage.

I went from a 1.6 petrol to 1.8 diesel and the mileage I get out of the diesel is a good 15 MPG better a month.

Personally, I would buy the diesel as it suits my lifesyle much better.


The other half will be using it mostly - about 10k a year on average.

I read that you're best to drive a few long journeys with high engine performance to clear filters in the engine? Ever heard of that?


Yeah a good blast out to clear the "smoke" wont hurt, but more towards the fact a Diesel engine takes a bit longer to warm up, so the odd long journey does the engine good.
Again I do plenty of small/medium and long journies so it suits me.


With the 100 extra miles

Roughly 50 MPG on a diesel is great, so thats 2 gallons per month you save.
2 gallons is 9 litres, which i petrol prices of around 1.40 is approx £13 a month better off with fuel costs. Coupled with cheaper services for Diesels/Generally better Tax Prices too etc is where the savings are.
banned#10
RedDev11
JonnyTwoToes
RedDev11
It depends on your mileage.

Diesels (if you factor in the extra purchase cost etc) tend to be cheaper to run if you do 10k miles a year or more roughly.

If the actual purchase price is similar (the example above was based on diesels being a couple of grand more expensive) between the 2, then with Diesel only being on average 3/4p more expensive its cheaper to run on pretty much most mileage.

I went from a 1.6 petrol to 1.8 diesel and the mileage I get out of the diesel is a good 15 MPG better a month.

Personally, I would buy the diesel as it suits my lifesyle much better.


The other half will be using it mostly - about 10k a year on average.

I read that you're best to drive a few long journeys with high engine performance to clear filters in the engine? Ever heard of that?


Yeah a good blast out to clear the "smoke" wont hurt, but more towards the fact a Diesel engine takes a bit longer to warm up, so the odd long journey does the engine good.
Again I do plenty of small/medium and long journies so it suits me.


With the 100 extra miles

Roughly 50 MPG on a diesel is great, so thats 2 gallons per month you save.
2 gallons is 9 litres, which i petrol prices of around 1.40 is approx £13 a month better off with fuel costs. Coupled with cheaper services for Diesels/Generally better Tax Prices too etc is where the savings are.


Great information! Thanks RedDev.
#11
Pretty much as above really - we have a 1.5 diesel Clio. It's mpg is pretty good, but over the last year or so, we are using it around town about 90% of the time with on average 10k miles over the year. So, personally, I don't think we are getting the benefit out of it, given that the cost of diesel is around 5p more per litre than petrol.

I'd say if you were doing a lot more mileage than 10k a year, then it starts to make sense to have a diesel.
#12
It depends on your mileage.

Diesels (if you factor in the extra purchase cost etc) tend to be cheaper to run if you do 10k miles a year or more roughly.

If the actual purchase price is similar (the example above was based on diesels being a couple of grand more expensive) between the 2, then with Diesel only being on average 3/4p more expensive its cheaper to run on pretty much most mileage.

I went from a 1.6 petrol to 1.8 diesel and the mileage I get out of the diesel is a good 15 MPG better a month.

Personally, I would buy the diesel as it suits my lifesyle much better.

Not entirely true . . .

10k is not alot of mileage overe a year and in no way does it require a diesel, its more than likely that you dont require one atall. Diesels will only give top mileage with motorway driving and long drives, whereas i pressume the 10k will be made up of smaller journeys or stop/start journeys. The reason for this is that the diesel engine needs time to warm up before it can output maximum mileage.

Diesel is also around about 5-7p dearer in most places i think youll find, so if you factor in that along with the servicing for a diesel, which can be costly as with my experience when something does go wrong with a diesel it goes very wrong, you will probably work out worse off than anything.

The 15MPG is good but pressumably this was found through long journeys and motorways ?

Also from a very personal point of view, diesels are very dirty cars, just look at the back end of a bus and youll see, I like my car to be sparkling and clean every week and couldnt stand having to try and scrub all the fume marks off every week.

Just down to what suits your lifestyle though i suppose
banned#13
DannyM
It depends on your mileage.

Diesels (if you factor in the extra purchase cost etc) tend to be cheaper to run if you do 10k miles a year or more roughly.

If the actual purchase price is similar (the example above was based on diesels being a couple of grand more expensive) between the 2, then with Diesel only being on average 3/4p more expensive its cheaper to run on pretty much most mileage.

I went from a 1.6 petrol to 1.8 diesel and the mileage I get out of the diesel is a good 15 MPG better a month.

Personally, I would buy the diesel as it suits my lifesyle much better.


Not entirely true . . .

10k is not alot of mileage overe a year and in no way does it require a diesel, its more than likely that you dont require one atall. Diesels will only give top mileage with motorway driving and long drives, whereas i pressume the 10k will be made up of smaller journeys or stop/start journeys. The reason for this is that the diesel engine needs time to warm up before it can output maximum mileage.

Diesel is also around about 5-7p dearer in most places i think youll find, so if you factor in that along with the servicing for a diesel, which can be costly as with my experience when something does go wrong with a diesel it goes very wrong, you will probably work out worse off than anything.

The 15MPG is good but pressumably this was found through long journeys and motorways ?

Also from a very personal point of view, diesels are very dirty cars, just look at the back end of a bus and youll see, I like my car to be sparkling and clean every week and couldnt stand having to try and scrub all the fume marks off every week.

Just down to what suits your lifestyle though i suppose


OK, the other half will be using it on a daily basis - she works as a community nurse.

She's in it pretty much all day (apart from when she's with patients). Will this give it enough time to 'warm up' or are you saying it needs a constant drive to do that?


Edited By: JonnyTwoToes on May 05, 2011 16:43
#14
Went from a 1.6 petrol to a 1.6 diesel and almost halved my fuel costs. but there are other factors to consider over and above the fuel type.
#15
OK, the other half will be using it on a daily basis - she works as a community nurse.

She's in it pretty much all day (apart from when she's with patients). Will this give it enough time to 'warm up' or are you saying it needs a constant drive to do that?


Constant drive. If shes a community nurse then most of the visits will be fairly local im guessing ?
so there wouldnt be any point in buying a diesel for that at all.
banned#16
DannyM
OK, the other half will be using it on a daily basis - she works as a community nurse.

She's in it pretty much all day (apart from when she's with patients). Will this give it enough time to 'warm up' or are you saying it needs a constant drive to do that?



Constant drive. If shes a community nurse then most of the visits will be fairly local im guessing ?
so there wouldnt be any point in buying a diesel for that at all.


She probably does about 35 - 40 miles a day on average.


Edited By: JonnyTwoToes on May 05, 2011 16:50
banned 2 Likes #17
Just don't drive this car by yourself JonnyTT, this is a ladies car and maybe verging on hairdresser territory, could put over the wrong message (ignore this if you are an estate agent)
#18
I've got an 58 Vectra 1.9CDti which gives a smooth ride with plenty of grunt and averages 45-49mpg. I'd never go back to a petrol car.
#19
She probably does about 35 - 40 miles a day on average.

Waste of money, stick with a petrol for the two of yous, your not going to get decent enough economy to justify paying for it.
#20
JonnyTwoToes
DannyM
OK, the other half will be using it on a daily basis - she works as a community nurse.

She's in it pretty much all day (apart from when she's with patients). Will this give it enough time to 'warm up' or are you saying it needs a constant drive to do that?



Constant drive. If shes a community nurse then most of the visits will be fairly local im guessing ?
so there wouldnt be any point in buying a diesel for that at all.


She probably does about 35 - 40 miles a day on average.




If the visit times are short the engine may stay warm; but I doubt it'll ever warm up completely.

A lot of folks recommend giving turbo diesel's some 'rest' time before pulling away after starting or turning off after stopping. (Can't remember how long is recommended but I think it's about a minute). As I've just found out it can be very expensive if your turbo or injectors fail but if she won't be keeping the car more than 3 or 4 years that shouldn't be an issue
banned#21
I LOVE diesels :D

So much low and mid range torque. Turbo diesels feel stupidily fast, because of the extreme acceleration.

Plus they are cheaper to run in the main. I get upto 60mpg even if I drive like a lunatic :D
banned#22
I own and drive both petrol and diesel cars. I like them both, though I definately prefer the £30 tax for the diesel over the £230 for the petrol. (The wifes petrol car is £120) It shouldnt influence any decision, but I admit it did!

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