Does anyone want to buy a mountain bike? - HotUKDeals
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Does anyone want to buy a mountain bike?

£0.00 @
Lol.
OldEnglish Avatar
4m, 4w agoPosted 4 months, 4 weeks ago
OldEnglish Avatar
4m, 4w agoPosted 4 months, 4 weeks ago
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(22) Jump to unreadPost a comment
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14 Likes #1
https://pics.onsizzle.com/sat-09-24-2016-bike-still-for-sale-8-45-am-yes-it-4109036.png
3 Likes #2
Does it come with all the accessories like.. a mountain?
3 Likes #3
If it's a mountain bike, shouldn't he be asking how high will it go? :|
1 Like #4
Whats the RPM at 2mph?
3 Likes #5
J4GG4
Whats the RPM at 2mph?
This is the method i use, can't be bothered to work it out for you. :p

RPM with one-step arithmetic.

Step 1
Measure the radius of the wheel that receives power from the pedals. Radius is measured from the center of the wheel to its outside edge.

Step 2
Multiply the radius of the wheel by 6.28 to calculate the circumference of the wheel. This is the distance your bike covers in one revolution.

Step 3
Divide 1056 by the circumference of the wheel. The quotient is your bike's conversion factor for moving directly between MPH and RPM.

Step 4
Convert MPH into RPM by multiplying any MPH reading and the conversion factor. Inversely, MPH is the quotient of RPM divided by the conversion factor
3 Likes #6
OldEnglish
J4GG4
Whats the RPM at 2mph?
This is the method i use, can't be bothered to work it out for you. :pRPM with one-step arithmetic.
Step 1
Measure the radius of the wheel that receives power from the pedals. Radius is measured from the center of the wheel to its outside edge.
Step 2
Multiply the radius of the wheel by 6.28 to calculate the circumference of the wheel. This is the distance your bike covers in one revolution.
Step 3
Divide 1056 by the circumference of the wheel. The quotient is your bike's conversion factor for moving directly between MPH and RPM.
Step 4
Convert MPH into RPM by multiplying any MPH reading and the conversion factor. Inversely, MPH is the quotient of RPM divided by the conversion factor

Yeah, that's the way I always do it. Remember it from primary school.
2 Likes #7
OldEnglish
J4GG4
Whats the RPM at 2mph?
This is the method i use, can't be bothered to work it out for you. :pRPM with one-step arithmetic.
Step 1
Measure the radius of the wheel that receives power from the pedals. Radius is measured from the center of the wheel to its outside edge.
Step 2
Multiply the radius of the wheel by 6.28 to calculate the circumference of the wheel. This is the distance your bike covers in one revolution.
Step 3
Divide 1056 by the circumference of the wheel. The quotient is your bike's conversion factor for moving directly between MPH and RPM.
Step 4
Convert MPH into RPM by multiplying any MPH reading and the conversion factor. Inversely, MPH is the quotient of RPM divided by the conversion factor

Yeah, that's the way I always do it. Remember it from primary school.
2 Likes #8
deeky
OldEnglish
J4GG4
Whats the RPM at 2mph?
This is the method i use, can't be bothered to work it out for you. :pRPM with one-step arithmetic.
Step 1
Measure the radius of the wheel that receives power from the pedals. Radius is measured from the center of the wheel to its outside edge.
Step 2
Multiply the radius of the wheel by 6.28 to calculate the circumference of the wheel. This is the distance your bike covers in one revolution.
Step 3
Divide 1056 by the circumference of the wheel. The quotient is your bike's conversion factor for moving directly between MPH and RPM.
Step 4
Convert MPH into RPM by multiplying any MPH reading and the conversion factor. Inversely, MPH is the quotient of RPM divided by the conversion factor
Yeah, that's the way I always do it. Remember it from primary school.
Yes i know ,some people want you to do everything for them. Sometimes all it needs is a bit of encouragement. X)
banned#9
Tell us again deeky.
3 Likes #10
MrScotchBonnet
Tell us again deeky.

Jeeze.....

RPM with one-step arithmetic.

Step 1
Measure the radius of the wheel that receives power from the pedals. Radius is measured from the center of the wheel to its outside edge.

Step 2
Multiply the radius of the wheel by 6.28 to calculate the circumference of the wheel. This is the distance your bike covers in one revolution.

Step 3
Divide 1056 by the circumference of the wheel. The quotient is your bike's conversion factor for moving directly between MPH and RPM.

Step 4
Convert MPH into RPM by multiplying any MPH reading and the conversion factor. Inversely, MPH is the quotient of RPM divided by the conversion factor.

I'm not repeating it again so pay attention.
banned 1 Like #11
deeky
MrScotchBonnet
Tell us again deeky.
Jeeze.....
RPM with one-step arithmetic.
Step 1
Measure the radius of the wheel that receives power from the pedals. Radius is measured from the center of the wheel to its outside edge.
Step 2
Multiply the radius of the wheel by 6.28 to calculate the circumference of the wheel. This is the distance your bike covers in one revolution.
Step 3
Divide 1056 by the circumference of the wheel. The quotient is your bike's conversion factor for moving directly between MPH and RPM.
Step 4
Convert MPH into RPM by multiplying any MPH reading and the conversion factor. Inversely, MPH is the quotient of RPM divided by the conversion factor.
I'm not repeating it again so pay attention.

You wise old Owl.
2 Likes #12
deeky
MrScotchBonnet
Tell us again deeky.
Jeeze.....
RPM with one-step arithmetic.
Step 1
Measure the radius of the wheel that receives power from the pedals. Radius is measured from the center of the wheel to its outside edge.
Step 2
Multiply the radius of the wheel by 6.28 to calculate the circumference of the wheel. This is the distance your bike covers in one revolution.
Step 3
Divide 1056 by the circumference of the wheel. The quotient is your bike's conversion factor for moving directly between MPH and RPM.
Step 4
Convert MPH into RPM by multiplying any MPH reading and the conversion factor. Inversely, MPH is the quotient of RPM divided by the conversion factor.
I'm not repeating it again so pay attention.

What you say?
3 Likes #13
deeky
MrScotchBonnet
Tell us again deeky.
Jeeze.....
RPM with one-step arithmetic.
Step 1
Measure the radius of the wheel that receives power from the pedals. Radius is measured from the center of the wheel to its outside edge.
Step 2
Multiply the radius of the wheel by 6.28 to calculate the circumference of the wheel. This is the distance your bike covers in one revolution.
Step 3
Divide 1056 by the circumference of the wheel. The quotient is your bike's conversion factor for moving directly between MPH and RPM.
Step 4
Convert MPH into RPM by multiplying any MPH reading and the conversion factor. Inversely, MPH is the quotient of RPM divided by the conversion factor.
I'm not repeating it again so pay attention.
I know why you haven't shut them up & told 'em the answer. I didn't tell you the wheel size?

Schoolboy error on my part deeky. Sorry. :(



Rear wheel size is 26". :p Please show your workings out.

Edited By: OldEnglish on Sep 29, 2016 14:13: ..
4 Likes #14
deeky
Yeah, that's the way I always do it. Remember it from primary school.

Was the wheel invented before you were at primary school? :{
3 Likes #15
A very wise lady once said to me you can't have to many bikes
and while I already have five.....
https://a.disquscdn.com/uploads/mediaembed/images/3899/6350/original.gif
1 Like #16
thewongwing101
A very wise lady once said to me you can't have to many bikes

Uh-huh.
#17
fanpages
thewongwing101
A very wise lady once said to me you can't have to many bikes
Uh-huh.
http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/i_could_care_less.png
3 Likes #18
thewongwing101
A very wise lady once said to me you can't have to many bikes
and while I already have five.....https://a.disquscdn.com/uploads/mediaembed/images/3899/6350/original.gif

I have been holding off telling you Wongy, I dont knwo why, maybe im a little disappointed in myself, but ive come to the conclusion that cycling isnt really for me but its made me realise anyone who does cycle now has a fair bit of respect from me, it isnt easy. :|
2 Likes #19
OldEnglish
deeky
MrScotchBonnet
Tell us again deeky.
Jeeze.....
RPM with one-step arithmetic.
Step 1
Measure the radius of the wheel that receives power from the pedals. Radius is measured from the center of the wheel to its outside edge.
Step 2
Multiply the radius of the wheel by 6.28 to calculate the circumference of the wheel. This is the distance your bike covers in one revolution.
Step 3
Divide 1056 by the circumference of the wheel. The quotient is your bike's conversion factor for moving directly between MPH and RPM.
Step 4
Convert MPH into RPM by multiplying any MPH reading and the conversion factor. Inversely, MPH is the quotient of RPM divided by the conversion factor.
I'm not repeating it again so pay attention.
I know why you haven't shut them up & told 'em the answer. I didn't tell you the wheel size?
Schoolboy error on my part deeky. Sorry. :(
Rear wheel size is 26". :p Please show your workings out.

25.85 RPM

Cba showing workings out. Suffice to say, it didn't work itself out :)
1 Like #20
haritori
thewongwing101
A very wise lady once said to me you can't have to many bikes
and while I already have five.....https://a.disquscdn.com/uploads/mediaembed/images/3899/6350/original.gif
I have been holding off telling you Wongy, I dont knwo why, maybe im a little disappointed in myself, but ive come to the conclusion that cycling isnt really for me but its made me realise anyone who does cycle now has a fair bit of respect from me, it isnt easy. :|
It is such a cliché that you never forget but it is also true that the more you do your legs seem to remember
one week one season to the next
so keep at it I say(nods)
1 Like #21
O its not a permiscuas man from wales?
#22
deeky
OldEnglish
deeky
MrScotchBonnet
Tell us again deeky.
Jeeze.....
RPM with one-step arithmetic.
Step 1
Measure the radius of the wheel that receives power from the pedals. Radius is measured from the center of the wheel to its outside edge.
Step 2
Multiply the radius of the wheel by 6.28 to calculate the circumference of the wheel. This is the distance your bike covers in one revolution.
Step 3
Divide 1056 by the circumference of the wheel. The quotient is your bike's conversion factor for moving directly between MPH and RPM.
Step 4
Convert MPH into RPM by multiplying any MPH reading and the conversion factor. Inversely, MPH is the quotient of RPM divided by the conversion factor.
I'm not repeating it again so pay attention.
I know why you haven't shut them up & told 'em the answer. I didn't tell you the wheel size?
Schoolboy error on my part deeky. Sorry. :(
Rear wheel size is 26". :p Please show your workings out.
25.85 RPM
Cba showing workings out. Suffice to say, it didn't work itself out :)
http://24.media.tumblr.com/ac0fb97f9e3eec8a965748c8ec6eda3f/tumblr_mo7lqwlfKK1s8hnhko1_500.gif
https://www.superstickers.com/Image/900/0/PNG/M-FS-S-FS-MS1545_1.jpeg

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