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Door Dilemma

MBeeching Avatar
5y, 10m agoPosted 5 years, 10 months ago
Afternoon folks. I'm having a door dilemma and hoped someone might be able to shed some light on the situation.

My front door handle broke this morning so I purchased a replacement this afternoon. The screw positions on the plate are close but not exact, however they are so close that adding new holes would be very weak.

Instead of replacing the whole plate I have been trying to remove the handle and swap them round, however I cannot see an obvious way to achieve this and wondered if it was even possible?

Thanks in advance : )

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MBeeching Avatar
5y, 10m agoPosted 5 years, 10 months ago
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#1
Here is the whole plate:
http://img220.imageshack.us/img220/829/fullzj.jpg

And a close up of the mechanism holding the handle:
http://img59.imageshack.us/img59/5904/closes.jpg
[mod] 1 Like #2
The black ring with holes in the end is a circlip, if you have circlip pliers or luck you may be able to remove it. Its spring steel so watch your eyes if it flys off.
You problem will be that I doubt that you will be able to make it fit the old plate, its probably different.

why not glue some whittled down wood in the old screw holes and then refit with maybe longer screws than before.
1 Like #3
If it is a wooden door then just use some dowels in the old holes.
#4
Just whack the screws in wonky...............25yrs ive been a cowboy but never owned a horse.
#5
MikeT
The black ring with holes in the end is a circlip, if you have circlip pliers or luck you may be able to remove it. Its spring steel so watch your eyes if it flys off.
You problem will be that I doubt that you will be able to make it fit the old plate, its probably different.


The replacement matches the original exactly other than the screw positions.
My instinct suggested that 'circlip' was the offending piece, it's proving a nightmare to remove (Dare say it's even harder to refit...)

Wish these screw hole positions were standardised, all the others in B&Q fail in other areas such as lock position.

Edited By: MBeeching on Jan 06, 2011 15:52
[mod]#6
A local small garage will have the circlip pliers you need and will no doubt swop the bits over for you for beer tokens
1 Like #7
Pack the existing screwholes with matches or cocktail sticks

Drill narrow pilot holes where the new screws will be ( get spacing from facing plate)
#8
I like these cunning suggestions, if it was my own door I would probably go gung-ho. Though suspect my landlady would flip if I did a real botch job :p

Called her first thing this morning to explain the situation but the matter appears to be in my own hands...



Edited By: MBeeching on Jan 06, 2011 16:47
#9
melipona
If it is a wooden door then just use some dowels in the old holes.


^^^This.
#10
Try a drop of WD40 on the circlip area before you attack it. If you dont have a circlip pliers hold one end with the point of a fork and get a small screwriver to push th other end away from you. You can use a larger pliers to push the circlip back on. Best of Luck ;)

MBeeching
MikeT
The black ring with holes in the end is a circlip, if you have circlip pliers or luck you may be able to remove it. Its spring steel so watch your eyes if it flys off.
You problem will be that I doubt that you will be able to make it fit the old plate, its probably different.

The replacement matches the original exactly other than the screw positions.
My instinct suggested that 'circlip' was the offending piece, it's proving a nightmare to remove (Dare say it's even harder to refit...)

Wish these screw hole positions were standardised, all the others in B&Q fail in other areas such as lock position.
1 Like #11
Beware!, behind the circlip ( if you can get it off ) is a small plate that restricts the arc movement of the handle, this plate will be holding a coiled spring in place that causes the handle to spring back into position after it's used, make sure this spring doesn't go flying off too!!!



Edited By: MrGrumpyman on Jan 06, 2011 17:22
#12
MrGrumpyman
Beware!, behind the circlip ( if you can get it off ) is a small plate that restricts the arc movement of the handle, this plate will be holding a coiled spring in place that causes the handle to spring back into position after it's used, make sure this spring doesn't go flying off too!!!


The coiled spring looks truly deadly :D

Don't think I will pursue this any further without proper circlip pliers and eye defenders.
My attempts to use flat head screwdrivers, needle nose pliers and other implements of destruction have failed miserably and I've cut my hand in the process.



Edited By: MBeeching on Jan 06, 2011 17:37
#13
Thanks everyone for all your helpful advice.

At least I can get into the flat now, when I left this morning I thought I'd end up sleeping at work X)

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