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Electronics Repair

kiwinator Avatar
8y, 8m agoPosted 8 years, 8 months ago
I want to do a hobbie such as repairing faulty DVD players and VCR's but is there like a guide on the internet that tells you how to repair them?

Thanks in advance!

btw im already doing a national diploma in electronic/electrical engineering.
kiwinator Avatar
8y, 8m agoPosted 8 years, 8 months ago
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banned#1
Most problems on DVD players and VCRs are just cheaper to replace so would be wasting your time surely, just like your national diploma.
#2
My national diploma is not a waste of time as it contains core subjects like PLC and micro-elec which are very expensive to make and repair so its not a waste of time :)
#3
kiwinator;1753148
My national diploma is not a waste of time as it contains core subjects like PLC and micro-elec which are very expensive to make and repair so its not a waste of time :)

I think lumoruk meant you are wasting your time doing a National Diploma if your aim is to repair DVD players....

If you were to do something useful with your HND..
#4
I am, thats why i said a "hobbie"
#5
Theres quite a lot of useful information on the net.. It just depends on what your repairing and or what the fault is... You can always do a google search for schematics, or quite often you can buy them. Some manufacturers will email out copies of schematics for free (although, very unlikely).

Personally I like repairing things like games consoles as theres a large community of modders and repairers on the net, with tons of information and advice. The parts are easier to come by too.
banned#6
warmapplepie
I think lumoruk meant you are wasting your time doing a National Diploma if your aim is to repair DVD players....

If you were to do something useful with your HND..


No National Diplomas are like a Going Nowhere Very Quick (GNVQ), National Diploma actually means "Not Deployable in the working environment" :p
#7
lumoruk
No National Diplomas are like a Going Nowhere Very Quick (GNVQ), National Diploma actually means "Not Deployable in the working environment" :p

I hope this is a joke. As someone who teaches in a secondary school I am aware of the value of the qualifications which you ridicule.
#8
Susannah
I hope this is a joke. As someone who teaches in a secondary school I am aware of the value of the qualifications which you ridicule.


I wouldn't worry to much, the poster in question is of dubious taste anyway, everyone knows karate was the batter character in "Batfink "!!

Mike..
banned#9
Susannah
I hope this is a joke. As someone who teaches in a secondary school I am aware of the value of the qualifications which you ridicule.


But you're not an employer :? and that is the main difference :roll: I did 1.5yrs of an Advanced GNVQ and it was the biggest waste of my life ever, all the kids were just copying what was in the book putting it into their own words and handing in the assignment as complete. The teacher would mark it with top grades while myself found this a little hard to comprehend quit.
#10
lumoruk;1753671
But you're not an employer :? and that is the main difference :roll: I did 1.5yrs of an Advanced GNVQ and it was the biggest waste of my life ever, all the kids were just copying what was in the book putting it into their own words and handing in the assignment as complete. The teacher would mark it with top grades while myself found this a little hard to comprehend quit.


Just because it wasnt for you doesnt mean that its a waste of time.
#11
lumoruk;1753671
But you're not an employer :? and that is the main difference :roll: I did 1.5yrs of an Advanced GNVQ and it was the biggest waste of my life ever, all the kids were just copying what was in the book putting it into their own words and handing in the assignment as complete. The teacher would mark it with top grades while myself found this a little hard to comprehend quit.

BTW, what do you do now?
#12
Titchimp;1753695
Just because it wasnt for you doesnt mean that its a waste of time.

vocational qualifications are less prestigious and that's a fact.
They are second class qualifications when ot comes to employers and universities.
#13
i don't know about UNIs but as an ex-personnel clerk of many years i can state that, in my experience at least, vocational qualifications aren't worth the paper they're printed on. if we had a choice between 2 people and one had "proper" qualifications and one had GNVQs then the proper ones won every single time.most employers regard them as second best, they may not in actuality be so, but thats the way employers look at them. sorry but thats just my personal experience. YMMV

as for the OPs question then yes there are loads of places you can get reference material from. i did this as a "hobby" earning pocket money for about 20 years and used to buy "television" magazine every month. it had loads of real life faults and the remedies as well as in-depth looks at particular chassis and models. it was an invaluable source of information and i believe that you can get back-issues to build up a library of fault information. satcure.com is another good source. the only reason i stopped is because it has reached the point where repair is not economically viable anymore. it is far cheaper to simply replace than to repair, even factoring out labour costs.
#14
I gained such qualifications 20 years ago in TV, Video, microprocessors and computers.
This direction in life was taken when it was gainful to repair electronic based products.
To give an idea how cheap consumer products are, I remember the quote from an old hand of TV hand "when colour TV boom began in the 70's, a 22" TV would cost £265, the van to deliver this to the door cost £750". Now a days, the van costs around £7500, therefore the TV should be around £2650! :w00t:
My advice for your hobby (as I did many years ago) SPECIALISE on just a few differing chassis. I used to subscribe to Television magazine, there used to be a wealth of stock faults listed along with many component suppliers. When you specialise your overheads are reduced as lesser differing components are having to be kept, lesser costs spent on manuals, circuit diagrams and special diagnostics programs, plus you'll gain the rapid experience of diagnosing common problems. I used to specialise on the popular products where spares readily available. I've been in repair business's where they have had racks of equipment awaiting rare to source spares, this is the scenario you need to avoid. Good Luck :thumbsup:

P.S Just noticed your location down in East Anglia, that's where I started my old TV servicing with HUGHES at Lowestoft and that's where the old tale came from! They were a great family firm to work for!
#15
kiwinator
My national diploma is not a waste of time as it contains core subjects like PLC and micro-elec which are very expensive to make and repair so its not a waste of time :)


I'm doing a DPhil/PhD in Electronic Engineering, and still some people whine on about how pointless it is or how I'd be better advised to work in a shop, become a stone mason, marry a royal or whatever other whiney nonsense pops into their empty head at that particular moment. It's best to ignore the naysayers and concentrate on doing what you enjoy. Studying, as you hopefully realise by now, is meant to be enjoyable and liberating. You should study because you love the subject and want to know more, not because a personnel clerk suggests you do, or don't. I'm not, of course, suggesting you don't already realise this, but thought I'd wade in with a bit of support. I'm a bit fed up of people, like lumorok, endlessly whining on about how one qualification or another is pointless when clearly their time would be better spent asking themselves why they are stuck with nothing better to do than troll forums looking for people to put down.
#16
Hillzat43
I gained such qualifications 20 years ago in TV, Video, microprocessors and computers.
This direction in life was taken when it was gainful to repair electronic based products.
To give an idea how cheap consumer products are, I remember the quote from an old hand of TV hand "when colour TV boom began in the 70's, a 22" TV would cost £265, the van to deliver this to the door cost £750". Now a days, the van costs around £7500, therefore the TV should be around £2650! :w00t:
My advice for your hobby (as I did many years ago) SPECIALISE on just a few differing chassis. I used to subscribe to Television magazine, there used to be a wealth of stock faults listed along with many component suppliers. When you specialise your overheads are reduced as lesser differing components are having to be kept, lesser costs spent on manuals, circuit diagrams and special diagnostics programs, plus you'll gain the rapid experience of diagnosing common problems. I used to specialise on the popular products where spares readily available. I've been in repair business's where they have had racks of equipment awaiting rare to source spares, this is the scenario you need to avoid. Good Luck :thumbsup:

P.S Just noticed your location down in East Anglia, that's where I started my old TV servicing with HUGHES at Lowestoft and that's where the old tale came from! They were a great family firm to work for!
cool! yeh hughes is near me (not lowestoft branch though) thxs for the advice:thumbsup:
#17
PkySam
I'm doing a DPhil/PhD in Electronic Engineering, and still some people whine on about how pointless it is or how I'd be better advised to work in a shop, become a stone mason, marry a royal or whatever other whiney nonsense pops into their empty head at that particular moment. It's best to ignore the naysayers and concentrate on doing what you enjoy. Studying, as you hopefully realise by now, is meant to be enjoyable and liberating. You should study because you love the subject and want to know more, not because a personnel clerk suggests you do, or don't. I'm not, of course, suggesting you don't already realise this, but thought I'd wade in with a bit of support. I'm a bit fed up of people, like lumorok, endlessly whining on about how one qualification or another is pointless when clearly their time would be better spent asking themselves why they are stuck withW nothing better to do than troll forums looking for people to put down.
Well said!!!! :thumbsup::-D
#18
also what TV mag do you guys recommend?
#19
ONC's, HNC's and D's are pretty much ESSENTIAL if you want to work in the engineering industry. Anything North Sea related requires ONC minimum before they will even look at you both onshore and offshore, any respectable engineering company will also require ONC minimum or equivalent experience before they will take you on.

Take it from someone who has worked in the Aerospace engineering industry for almost 15 years, going to college and getting qualifications like that will help a lot when people like me are looking at your CV. Later on in life HNC/D + Experience is arguably better than an engineering degree in some cases.


Ignore what the person said above as they clearly have no idea what they are talking about. Good luck with your college, I'm sat here doing my second HNC in four years whilst holding down a full time job, and I love it ;)
#20
Ritchie 2
ONC's, HNC's and D's are pretty much ESSENTIAL if you want to work in the engineering industry. Anything North Sea related requires ONC minimum before they will even look at you both onshore and offshore, any respectable engineering company will also require ONC minimum or equivalent experience before they will take you on.

Take it from someone who has worked in the Aerospace engineering industry for almost 15 years, going to college and getting qualifications like that will help a lot when people like me are looking at your CV. Later on in life HNC/D + Experience is arguably better than an engineering degree in some cases.


Ignore what the person said above as they clearly have no idea what they are talking about. Good luck with your college, I'm sat here doing my second HNC in four years whilst holding down a full time job, and I love it ;)
:thumbsup::-D:-D:-D

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