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engine oil help

bargain buyer Avatar
6y, 10m agoPosted 6 years, 10 months ago
my dad has put 15w40 oil in my car but just checked my manual and it says to put in 10w40 does it really make a difference. i havent got a clue
my next door neighbour said i would have to drain all the oil out and put the right one in, dont know if he taking the mick tho
bargain buyer Avatar
6y, 10m agoPosted 6 years, 10 months ago
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#1
Not a problem unless you're running a supercar :) , the oil will be slightly thicker and even less so once mixed with the existing in the engine,
#2
Not really a huge deal - especially if your car is getting on a bit, the heavier grade is perhaps more suitable.
#3
If its just a top up it will be fine
#4
thanks guys im going to kill my neighbour he told me i would need to change oil filter and everything
#5
Ignore the above comments, it can make a huge difference. What car and engine is it?

Reading again, did you just top it up? If so, by how much? Also what oil did he use, oil is far more than a grade.
#6
bargain buyer
thanks guys im going to kill my neighbour he told me i would need to change oil filter and everything


Your neighbour is an idiot.:thumbsup:
#7
I found this on Castrol's site. The short of it is that unless it's a racing engine or subjected to extreme climatic conditions then its fine.

Which viscosity grade is right for you?

SAE Viscosity Grade Motor Oil: 5W-30
Temperature Conditions: Below 0° F
Description: Provides excellent fuel economy and low temperature performance in most late-model automobiles. Especially recommended for new cars.

SAE Viscosity Grade Motor Oil: 10W-30
Temperature Conditions: Above 0° F
Description: Most frequently recommended motor oil viscosity grade for most automobile engines, including high-performance multivalve engines and turbo-charged engines.

SAE Viscosity Grade Motor Oil: 10W-40
Temperature Conditions: Above 0° F
Description: The first multigrade introduced. A good choice for controlling engine wear and preventing oil breakdown from oxidation. Note: Always check your owner's manual or warranty requirements before using this grade.

SAE Viscosity Grade Motor Oil: 20W-50
Temperature Conditions: Above 20° F
Description: Provides maximum protection for high-performance, high-RPM racing engines. Excellent choice for high temperature and heavy loads such as driving in the desert or towing a trailer at high speeds for long periods of time.

SAE Viscosity Grade Motor Oil: SAE 30 & SAE 40
Temperature Conditions: Above 40° F & Above 60° F
Description: For cars and light trucks, where recommended by manufacturers. Not recommended when cold-temperature starting is required.

Note: It is important to consult your vehicle handbook to establish the correct grade for your car and environment.
#8
The only difference is how they perform at different temperature ranges.

Top Gear did a study last year and 9/10 cars in the study were using the wrong oil.

They also took a moderately old car and drained the oil completely and saw how far it went before the enginee blew up....it was about 2 miles!

Moral of the story is, no matter what's in there, it's better than nothing!!!

PS there weren't just 10 cars in the study before anyone says!
#9
gal2792t
The only difference is how they perform at different temperature ranges.

Top Gear did a study last year and 9/10 cars in the study were using the wrong oil.

PS there wasn't just 10 cars in the study before any says!


The only difference? Don't you think that's important?
#10
pghstochaj
The only difference? Don't you think that's important?


Perhaps you could enlighten us all as you seem to think differently, rather than posing questions...
#11
pghstochaj
The only difference? Don't you think that's important?


Depends if you got a K reg or a 09 ;-)
#12
moob
Perhaps you could enlighten us all as you seem to think differently, rather than posing questions...


I have asked questions of the OP to give a considered response, rather than potentially incorrect blanket claims.

To give you a few things to look into, consider:

Mineral, part-synthetic, synthetic and fully synthetic oils;
Mixing of different oils;
The effect of turbochargers and/or particulate filters; and
Design grade for the engine in the UK.

The days of putting any old oil into a car (even if the grade matches) is long gone and can caused all sorts of problems.

An interesting read:
http://www.carbibles.com/engineoil_bible.html
#13
gal2792t
Depends if you got a K reg or a 09 ;-)


Unfortunately it's still important, if you use a genuine pure synthetic on a K reg it might do harm, especially if you are mixing it with old mineral based oil not changed for years. On an 09 you are more likely to have a turbocharger, particulate filter etc. etc. to worry about and smaller design engineering tolerances.
#14
pghstochaj
I have asked questions of the OP to give a considered response, rather than potentially incorrect blanket claims.

To give you a few things to look into, consider:

Mineral, part-synthetic, synthetic and fully synthetic oils;
Mixing of different oils;
The effect of turbochargers and/or particulate filters; and
Design grade for the engine in the UK.

The days of putting any old oil into a car (even if the grade matches) is long gone and can caused all sorts of problems.

An interesting read:
http://www.carbibles.com/engineoil_bible.html


Aye very good, we've all got access to researching articles on the internet about the slim chance of there being a problem - but you'll find most posters have made a number of assumptions when answering the OP's question.

If he wants a definitive answer, perhaps he needs to visit a garage.

PS: You made a 'blanket claim' with your first post on this thread.:roll:
#15
moob
Aye very good, we've all got access to researching articles on the internet about the slim chance of there being a problem - but you'll find most posters have made a number of assumptions when answering the OP's question.

If he wants a definitive answer, perhaps he needs to visit a garage.

PS: You made a 'blanket claim' with your first post on this thread.:roll:


What was the blanket claim?

If you have access to the internet then use it to learn about lubrication - alternatively avoid making unverified and potentially costly statements. A garage is also not the answer, a mechanic generally does not understand the finer points of lubrication.
#16
pghstochaj
What was the blanket claim?

If you have access to the internet then use it to learn about lubrication - alternatively avoid making unverified and potentially costly statements. A garage is also not the answer, a mechanic generally does not understand the finer points of lubrication.


This:
Ignore the above comments, it can make a huge difference. What car and engine is it?


Seriously, if this lad has simply topped up a car with a heavier grade of oil than his manual states, with a few caveats, it will have no significant effect.

I haven't referred to any article on the web, merely driving my car and having experience in servicing them in the past, hangin' about a garage with some mates etc for the past 25 years - I've no need 'to learn about lubrication' or indeed 'the finer points of lubrication' to pass on some basic reassurance to an anonymous bloke on the internet!

God, I thought I was pedantic until I noticed the crap you post on here. :lol:
#17
moob
This:


Seriously, if this lad has simply topped up a car with a heavier grade of oil than his manual states, with a few caveats, it will have no significant effect.

I haven't referred to any article on the web, merely driving my car and having experience in servicing them in the past, hangin' about a garage with some mates etc for the past 25 years - I've no need 'to learn about lubrication' or indeed 'the finer points of lubrication' to pass on some basic reassurance to an anonymous bloke on the internet!

God, I thought I was pedantic until I noticed the crap you post on here. :lol:


That is not a blanket statement, "it can" is entirely true, saying "it will" is a blanket statement. We can ignore that.

The "few caveats" are exactly why you should not state something without checking first - especially when the advice could destroy an engine.
#18
pghstochaj
That is not a blanket statement, "it can" is entirely true, saying "it will" is a blanket statement. We can ignore that.

The "few caveats" are exactly why you should not state something without checking first - especially when the advice could destroy an engine.


Let me spell it out for you:

Ignore the above comments


is a blanket statement, not even you could deny that, surely.

The caveats I'm referring to are generally accepted as being read, as the OP had already referred to his manual, thereby determining whether he require synthetic/semi etc - it wouldn't be fully synthetic anyway, so that can be discounted as a possibility.

Topping up some oil in a car that has 10W40 with 15W40 is hardly about to 'destroy the engine'.

Anyway, back to caveats - there's a real cracker at the top of that link you posted:

I am a pro-car, pro-motorbike petrolhead into basic maintenance. This site is self-published to spread my knowledge. By reading these pages, you agree to indemnify, defend and hold harmless the author, any sponsors and/or site providers against any and all claims, damages, costs or other expenses that arise directly or indirectly from you fiddling with your vehicle as a result of what you read here. If you hurt your vehicle or yourself, don't blame me.


:lol:
#19
No, it didn't say "ignore all comments", it said ignore the comments above. I guess you don't understand what the phrase "blanket statement" means.

Again, your advice is bad because:
1) you do not know what car or engine it is; and
2) you do not know whether it was just topped up or a complete oil change.

For example:
"Topping up some oil in a car that has 10W40 with 15W40 is hardly about to 'destroy the engine'."
1) Depends on the engine type; and
2) you have assumed that it was just a top up.

" it wouldn't be fully synthetic anyway, so that can be discounted as a possibility."

Why would you discount that? Do you know what oil the 15W40 oil is? Oil is more than just a grade.



moob
Let me spell it out for you:



is a blanket statement, not even you could deny that, surely.

The caveats I'm referring to are generally accepted as being read, as the OP had already referred to his manual, thereby determining whether he require synthetic/semi etc - it wouldn't be fully synthetic anyway, so that can be discounted as a possibility.

Topping up some oil in a car that has 10W40 with 15W40 is hardly about to 'destroy the engine'.

Anyway, back to caveats - there's a real cracker at the top of that link you posted:



:lol:
#20
pghstochaj
No, it didn't say "ignore all comments", it said ignore the comments above. I guess you don't understand what the phrase "blanket statement" means.


Neither did I, because I c&p'd your comment - read it again.

pghstochaj
Again, your advice is bad because:
1) you do not know what car or engine it is; and
2) you do not know whether it was just topped up or a complete oil change.

For example:
"Topping up some oil in a car that has 10W40 with 15W40 is hardly about to 'destroy the engine'."
1) Depends on the engine type; and
2) you have assumed that it was just a top up.



As I mentioned before, and at the risk of repeating myself, again using the term 'caveats' - let's not forget here, you're also making assumptions, aren't you?

Give me an example where topping up with 15W instead of 10w would destroy an engine

pghstochaj
" it wouldn't be fully synthetic anyway, so that can be discounted as a possibility."

Why would you discount that? Do you know what oil the 15W40 oil is? Oil is more than just a grade.


Because, fully synthetic tends to be used in a performance car, hardly likely a bloke who owns such a car would ask on an internet forum like this...

At the end of the day, we've all made a lot of assumptions here, as we don't have all the information from the OP, it's just that the info provided by the majority are assuming the status quo rather than the exception.
#21
I don't need to read it again, it's not a blanket statement to say ignore the above comments, it would need to say "ignore all comments".

My goodness, you don't even understand the word assumption. It is not an assmuption to assume nothing, by definition. I haven't assumed a car, whether it has been topped up or is a complete change etc. You have. You have assumed that it is a car which is not sensitive to oil and that it was only topped up.

An example of where using 15W40 instead of 10W40 oil? The Renault-Nissan DCI engine - it would kill the turbocharger, anything from 1 mile to 100,000 miles, but it would definitely reduce the life of the turbocharger. When the turbocharger fails it of course consumes the engine oil and damages the engine. If the OP owns a Renault DCI engine, then they should consider replacing the oil. Same goes for VAG PD engines but I would have to check whether any have ever used 10W40 (or just make an assumption like you have and say it's the case). Oil is also not just 10W or 15W, nor is it just a multigrade number. Once again, certain engines need very specific oils, be it low soot or other specialist properties.

Once again, wrong re: synthetic oils, most modern engines now require synthetic oils.

So the answer is:

1) it depends on your car; and
2) it depends on what oil you have used.

The answer then might be "yes, it is fine" but until you know 1) and 2), you can't answer without making it up - it is not appropriate to make an assumption. If you do make an assumption, go for the conservative and assume that it's a VAG PD engine and that the oil should be replaced ASAP.

moob
Neither did I, because I c&p'd your comment - read it again.



As I mentioned before, and at the risk of repeating myself, again using the term 'caveats' - let's not forget here, you're also making assumptions, aren't you?

Give me an example where topping up with 15W instead of 10w would destroy an engine



Because, fully synthetic tends to be used in a performance car, hardly likely a bloke who owns such a car would ask on an internet forum like this...

At the end of the day, we've all made a lot of assumptions here, as we don't have all the information from the OP, it's just that the info provided by the majority are assuming the status quo rather than the exception.
#22
pghstochaj
I don't need to read it again, it's not a blanket statement to say ignore the above comments, it would need to say "ignore all comments".

My goodness, you don't even understand the word assumption. It is not an assmuption to assume nothing, by definition. I haven't assumed a car, whether it has been topped up or is a complete change etc. You have. You have assumed that it is a car which is not sensitive to oil and that it was only topped up.

An example of where using 15W40 instead of 10W40 oil? The Renault-Nissan DCI engine - it would kill the turbocharger, anything from 1 mile to 100,000 miles, but it would definitely reduce the life of the turbocharger. When the turbocharger fails it of course consumes the engine oil and damages the engine. If the OP owns a Renault DCI engine, then they should consider replacing the oil. Same goes for VAG PD engines but I would have to check whether any have ever used 10W40 (or just make an assumption like you have and say it's the case). Oil is also not just 10W or 15W, nor is it just a multigrade number. Once again, certain engines need very specific oils, be it low soot or other specialist properties.

Once again, wrong re: synthetic oils, most modern engines now require synthetic oils.

So the answer is:

1) it depends on your car; and
2) it depends on what oil you have used.

The answer then might be "yes, it is fine" but until you know 1) and 2), you can't answer without making it up - it is not appropriate to make an assumption. If you do make an assumption, go for the conservative and assume that it's a VAG PD engine and that the oil should be replaced ASAP.


I'm not even going to address your rambling regards the 'blanket statement' crap, as it's putting me to sleep.

If you reckon you're not making any assumptions with your remarks, you're way off the mark - see your comments regards fully synthetic.

Regards the Renault dci engine, I used to have a Megane, the wife had a Clio, both dci, they were topped up using 15W40 - nothing failed in either until sold - both did in excess of 80k.

We will never end up agreeing here, so...
#23
moob
I'm not even going to address your rambling regards the 'blanket statement' crap, as it's putting me to sleep.

If you reckon you're not making any assumptions with your remarks, you're way off the mark - see your comments regards fully synthetic.

Regards the Renault dci engine, I used to have a Megane, the wife had a Clio, both dci, they were topped up using 15W40 - nothing failed in either until sold - both did in excess of 80k.

We will never end up agreeing here, so...


There's no need to agree or not, your advice was bad advice and you do not understand the importance of oil type in a modern engine.

It is not an assumption to state that most new cars need synthetic oils. It is a fact. Do you know what an assumption is?
#24
pghstochaj
There's no need to agree or not, your advice was bad advice and you do not understand the importance of oil type in a modern engine.


You simply don't know this as a fact, because you're not privy to the OP's situation - I suppose neither am I - you don't even know if it's a modern car we're talking about here...

pghstochaj
It is not an assumption to state that most new cars need synthetic oils. It is a fact. Do you know what an assumption is?


OK, I'll illustrate - I think you're an arrogant tool, I guess that's an assumption, as I don't really know you.
#25
moob
You simply don't know this as a fact, because you're not privy to the OP's situation - I suppose neither am I - you don't even know if it's a modern car we're talking about here...



OK, I'll illustrate - I think you're an arrogant tool, I guess that's an assumption, as I don't really know you.


I know it's bad advice as a fact, because you shouldn't guess at it because it could be wrong. For instance, somebody asks "is my leg broken?", it's bad advice to say "no, leave it and don't go to the hospital". It might not be wrong, but the assumption means that it's bad advice.

That's also not an assumption, it's an opinion, but nevermind.
#26
moob
You simply don't know this as a fact, because you're not privy to the OP's situation - I suppose neither am I - you don't even know if it's a modern car we're talking about here...



OK, I'll illustrate - I think you're an arrogant tool, I guess that's an assumption, as I don't really know you.


I know it's bad advice as a fact, because you shouldn't guess at it because it could be wrong. For instance, somebody asks "is my leg broken?", it's bad advice to say "no, leave it and don't go to the hospital". It might not be wrong, but the assumption means that it's bad advice.

That's also not an assumption, it's an opinion, but nevermind.

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