Ever thought about how & where some of the 'old sayings' came from ? - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HUKD, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HUKD app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit

Ever thought about how & where some of the 'old sayings' came from ?

snowtiger Avatar
8y, 8m agoPosted 8 years, 8 months ago
Please post any 'old sayings' & meanings you know .........

ie
In Shakespeare's time, mattresses were secured on bed frames by ropes.
When on the ropes the mattress tightened, making the bed firmer to sleep on.
Hence the phrase "Goodnight, sleep tight."

**

It was the accepted practice in Babylon 4,000 years ago that for a month after the wedding, the bride's father would supply his son-in-law with all the mead he could drink. Mead is a honey beer and because their calendar was lunar based, this period was called the honey month, or what we know today as the honeymoon.

**

In English pubs, ale is ordered by pints and quarts. So in old England, when customers got unruly, the bartender would yell at them to mind their own pints and quarts and settle down. It's where we get the phrase "Mind your P's and Q's."

**

Many years ago in England, pub frequenters had a whistle baked into the rim or handle of their ceramic cups. When they needed a refill, they used the whistle to get some service. "Wet your whistle" is the phrase inspired by this practice.

**
snowtiger Avatar
8y, 8m agoPosted 8 years, 8 months ago
Options

All Comments

(12) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
[FONT=Verdana][FONT=arial][SIZE=4][COLOR=#ff0000]BITE THE BULLET[/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT]
[SIZE=4][FONT=Verdana]Means to grin and bear a painful situation. It comes from the days before anaesthetics. A soldier about to undergo an operation was given a bullet to bite.[/FONT][/SIZE]
[/FONT]

[FONT=Verdana]In Scotland, a new game was invented. It was called Gentlemen Only, Ladies Forbidden .... and thus the word GOLF entered into the English language.[/FONT]

[COLOR=#ff0000]CODSWALLOP[/COLOR]
[FONT=arial][SIZE=4]In the 19th century wallop was slang for beer. A man named Codd began selling lemonade and it was called Codswallop. In time codswallop began to mean anything worthless or inferior and later anything untrue.
[/SIZE][/FONT]

[FONT=Verdana]In ancient England a person could not have sex unless you had consent of the King (unless you were in the Royal Family). When anyone wanted to have a baby, they got consent of the King. The King gave them a placard that they hung on their door while they were having sex. The placard had F--K (Fornication Under Consent of the King) on it. Now you know where that came from.[/FONT]


[COLOR=#ff0000]BEAT ABOUT THE BUSH[/COLOR]
When hunting birds some people would beat about the bush to drive them out into the open. Other people would than catch the birds. 'I won't beat about the bush' came to mean 'I will go straight to the point without any delay'.
#2
Id always wondered where the last word came from!! nice post :thumbsup:
#3
[CENTER][FONT="Century Gothic"][COLOR="Purple"][SIZE="2"]KICK THE BUCKET

When slaughtering a pig you tied its back legs to a wooden beam (in French buquet). As the animal died it kicked the buquet.[/SIZE][/COLOR][/FONT]
[/CENTER]
#4
[SIZE="2"][COLOR="DarkOrchid"][FONT="Century Gothic"]SHOW A LEG

Comes from the days when women were allowed onboard ships. When it was time for sailors to get out of their hammocks women would show a leg to prove they were females not members of the crew.[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
#5
Good idea for a thread - I wonder if we'll get any sayings with multiple / differing origins.

A glass with a whistle built in sounds pretty cool

One that I looked up the other day was 'Bargain at half the price', as I never really understood it - I can't remember the outcome though (I think it was that the original phrase was 'bargain at twice the price' or something, or I just got the phrase wrong).

Anyway, that wasn't as coherent as I had hoped.
#6
[COLOR=#ff0000]GO TO POT[/COLOR]
Any farm animal that had outlived its usefulness such as a hen that no longer laid eggs would literally go to pot. It was cooked and eaten.


[COLOR=#ff0000]HUMBLE PIE[/COLOR]
The expression to eat humble pie was once to eat umble pie. The umbles were the intestines or less appetising parts of an animal and servants and other lower class people ate them. So if a deer was killed the rich ate venison and those of low status ate umble pie. In time it became corrupted to eat humble pie and came to mean to debase yourself or act with humility.

[COLOR=#ff0000]RED HERRING[/COLOR]
Poachers and other unsavoury characters would drag a herring across the ground where they had just walked to throw dogs off their scent. (Herrings were made red by the process of curing).

[COLOR=#ff0000]KICK THE BUCKET[/COLOR]
[FONT=arial][SIZE=4]When slaughtering a pig you tied its back legs to a wooden beam (in French buquet). As the animal died it kicked the buquet.[/SIZE][/FONT]

[COLOR=#ff0000]NAMBY-PAMBY[/COLOR]
Was originally a nickname for the poet Ambrose Philips (1674-1749) who was known for writing sentimental verse.
#7
FROG IN YOUR THROAT

Medieval physicians believed that the secretions of a frog could cure a cough if they were coated on the throat of the patient. The frog was placed in the mouth of the sufferer and remained there until the physician decided that the treatment was complete.
#8
[COLOR="DarkOrchid"][SIZE="2"][B][SIZE="2"]'One for the road' and 'On the Wagon' both date back to the days when people used to be hung near to Marble Arch on Oxford street I believe.

There was an inn halfway down the road and when the truck carrying the crim from the cop shop to the noose was on it's journey it would stop at the inn and allow the criminal to have one last drink (one for the road to death) before getting (on the wagon).[/SIZE]
[/SIZE][/COLOR][/B]
#9
snowtiger;2001224
[FONT=Verdana]In ancient England a person could not have sex unless you had consent of the King (unless you were in the Royal Family). When anyone wanted to have a baby, they got consent of the King. The King gave them a placard that they hung on their door while they were having sex. The placard had F--K (Fornication Under Consent of the King) on it. Now you know where that came from.[/FONT]


I always thought this one came from the criminal charge of having sex out of wedlock whereby you was brought before the court For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge.

Threshold, in times of old straw (thresh) was used as a floor covering and to prevent this escaping the room a wooden bar was screwed to the florr in the the doorway to hold it back, hence threshold.

Raining cats and dogs, small animals used to sleep in the eaves of thatched roofs, when it rained they would scurry out, hence raining cats and dogs.
#10
Cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey

On war ships the cannon balls were of iron and the plate they were stacked on beside the cannon was made of brass, the plate was known as a monkey. In extreme cold the two metals would contract differently and the iron balls would fall off the monkey.
#11
[COLOR=darkslategray]RESTING ON YOUR LAURELS, LOOK TO YOUR LAURELS[/COLOR]
[COLOR=darkslategray]In the ancient world winning athletes and other heroes and distinguished people were given wreaths of laurel leaves. If you are resting on your laurels you are relying on your past achievements. If you need to look to your laurels it means you have competition.[/COLOR]


[COLOR=darkslategray]LICK INTO SHAPE[/COLOR]
[COLOR=darkslategray]In the Middle Ages people thought that bear cubs were born shapeless and their mother literally licked them into shape.[/COLOR]


[COLOR=darkslategray]A LONG SHOT[/COLOR]
[COLOR=darkslategray]A long shot is an option with only a small chance of success. In the past guns were only accurate at short range. So a 'long shot' (fired over a long distance) only had a small chance of hitting its target.[/COLOR]


[COLOR=darkslategray]NOT ENOUGH ROOM TO SWING A CAT[/COLOR]
[COLOR=darkslategray]Comes from the use of a kind of whip called a cat o' nine tails.[/COLOR]
#12
[COLOR=#ff0000][COLOR=darkslategray]PULL THE WOOL OVER MY EYES[/COLOR]
[COLOR=darkslategray]In the 18th century it was the fashion to wear white, curly wigs. they were nick named wool possibly because they resembled a sheep's fleece.[/COLOR]
[/COLOR]

[COLOR=darkslategray]POT LUCK[/COLOR]
[COLOR=darkslategray]In the past all kinds of food went into a big pot for cooking. If you sat down to a meal with a family you often had to take 'pot luck' and could never be quite sure what you would be served[/COLOR]


[COLOR=darkslategray]READ THE RIOT ACT[/COLOR]
[COLOR=darkslategray]Following a law of 1715 if a rowdy group of 12 or more people gathered, a magistrate would read an official statement ordering them to disperse. Anyone who did not, after one hour, could be arrested and punished.[/COLOR]

Post a Comment

You don't need an account to leave a comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!