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Facebook privacy - missing boy - 15 year old Arthur Heeler-Frood

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Arthur is 15 and he has by all accounts, run away. He left a letter for his parents and has not taken his passport. His family have heard nothing from him. They have physically searched different p…
Mark2111 Avatar
3m, 1w agoPosted 3 months, 1 week ago
Arthur is 15 and he has by all accounts, run away. He left a letter for his parents and has not taken his passport.

His family have heard nothing from him. They have physically searched different places etc and are currently in the news making appeals.

And the family has since discovered that, the night before he left home, Arthur was on his Facebook account and may have been in contact with an unknown person. They and the police have pleaded with the social network company to release this information but, to date, Facebook has refused.

His mother Caroline is at pains to explain why she believes this Facebook link is so vital.
'Arthur left without his passport or his phone and only £350,' says Caroline. 'Normally, kids are tracked in 45 hours either by their phone or on CCTV, but what's extraordinary is it's now been nine-and-a-half weeks and there's been no contact from him at all. No sightings. No CCTV footage. We visited towns along the South Coast, we've been to Manchester, Liverpool, London.
'We've contacted homeless organisations, coach stations, hospitals, train stations — anywhere we can think of to put up posters, but we've heard nothing.
'That's why this Facebook link is so crucial. We just need them to release information to the police so they can see if he's been in contact with someone.'

Should Facebook be forced to reveal the in formation to the police?

I think they should.
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Mark2111 Avatar
3m, 1w agoPosted 3 months, 1 week ago
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6 Likes #1
Absolutely. I would have thought Facebook were morally obligated to assist police investigations in cases like this, especially when it seems that they are the final link before the boy's disappearance. Social Media should not need to be forced to release information concerning users when lives are possibly at risk.

Edited By: Predikuesi on Nov 12, 2016 08:57
2 Likes #2
Can't the police get a warrent or something to force them?

He's 15 anyway, a child.
9 Likes #3
Can't we just close Facegod down?
4 Likes #4
Can't we just close Facegod down?

I'll second that. and Twitter et al. Waste of time, causes more trouble than it's worth.

Edited By: SidSnot on Nov 12, 2016 09:42
2 Likes #5
On this occasion Facebook should help the police with their enquiries.
3 Likes #6
I can understand their might be legal complications if the missing person is an adult but as he is a child, the access to his Facebook should be given to the police.

The boy had limited funds, left his mobile at home, it stands to reason that someone is helping him.

He may have left willingly but his whereabouts and safety need to be confirmed.

At 15 he thinks he knows it all and he may well be an intelligent and capable lad but in today's world he is vunerable and may fall prey to those with no morals or scruples.
2 Likes #7
In a time where Apple wouldn't give up a security code for a murderers phone to the FBI, I really doubt Facebook will give up the link to a runaway 15 year old's Facebook page.
2 Likes #8
CaptCShadow
In a time where Apple wouldn't give up a security code for a murderers phone to the FBI, I really doubt Facebook will give up the link to a runaway 15 year old's Facebook page.


​Though as I post this, I do agree that as he is a child, they should be cooperating with the police on this.
2 Likes #9
He is classed as a runaway but he may be manipulated by an adult who has encouraged him to do this so he can get the boy alone and away from his family.

There was a lad of a similar age lured by a bloke under the guise of playing video games and the boy was murdered.

If this was a 15 year old girl, I think there would be more of an outcry. There certainly was when that 15 year old girl went willingly to France with her teacher a few years back!
#10
If by joining he signed a privacy agreement then if they do tell they are breaking the agreement and he could sue them.
#11
rodders443
If by joining he signed a privacy agreement then if they do tell they are breaking the agreement and he could sue them.

He is a minor. Under 18 he can't legally be responsible? I didn't think he could be, correct me if wrong.
3 Likes #12
His parents must be out of their minds with worry. Of course Facebook must delve for information and hand it over. Sincerely hope that it all turns out well.
#14
lose - lose situation for facebook.

hand over all information to police - outcry over breach of privacy, would be severe legal implications if they do.

if they dont - daily mail will write an article about them.
2 Likes #15
Mark2111
rodders443
If by joining he signed a privacy agreement then if they do tell they are breaking the agreement and he could sue them.
He is a minor. Under 18 he can't legally be responsible? I didn't think he could be, correct me if wrong.

Of course you are legally responsible under 18, look at that 14 and 15 year old who murdered mum and her daughter recently. The kids are now serving 20+ years.
#16
CaptCShadow
In a time where Apple wouldn't give up a security code for a murderers phone to the FBI, I really doubt Facebook will give up the link to a runaway 15 year old's Facebook page.
They didn't have a security code, what they refused to do was help crack their own encryption.
#17
£350? How's a 15 year old have access to that?
1 Like #18
MrScotchBonnet
£350? How's a 15 year old have access to that?
Have you heard of bank accounts? My kids could have laid their hands on more cash than that at 15 so I'm sure lots of others could as well.
#19
Mark2111
I can understand their might be legal complications if the missing person is an adult but as he is a child, the access to his Facebook should be given to the police.
The boy had limited funds, left his mobile at home, it stands to reason that someone is helping him.
He may have left willingly but his whereabouts and safety need to be confirmed.
At 15 he thinks he knows it all and he may well be an intelligent and capable lad but in today's world he is vunerable and may fall prey to those with no morals or scruples.

But your missing the point. His express wish was not to try and find him.
Taking a phone, passport and loads of money sets no challenge. Look at how much he has achieved, nobody has a clue.
Great adventures start from humble beginnings.

So I say good luck to him. :)
#20
GAVINLEWISHUKD
Mark2111
I can understand their might be legal complications if the missing person is an adult but as he is a child, the access to his Facebook should be given to the police.
The boy had limited funds, left his mobile at home, it stands to reason that someone is helping him.
He may have left willingly but his whereabouts and safety need to be confirmed.
At 15 he thinks he knows it all and he may well be an intelligent and capable lad but in today's world he is vunerable and may fall prey to those with no morals or scruples.
But your missing the point. His express wish was not to try and find him.
Taking a phone, passport and loads of money sets no challenge. Look at how much he has achieved, nobody has a clue.
Great adventures start from humble beginnings.
So I say good luck to him. :)
Yeah, for all his parents know, he could be dead by now. I assume that you're not old enough to have children. (_;)

Edited By: RonChew on Nov 12, 2016 12:36: context
1 Like #21
Rubisco
CaptCShadow
In a time where Apple wouldn't give up a security code for a murderers phone to the FBI, I really doubt Facebook will give up the link to a runaway 15 year old's Facebook page.
They didn't have a security code, what they refused to do was help crack their own encryption.


​I knew it was something like that.

Couldn't be bothered looking it up.
#22
RonChew
MrScotchBonnet
£350? How's a 15 year old have access to that?
Have you heard of bank accounts? My kids could have laid their hands on more cash than that at 15 so I'm sure lots of others could as well.

In all honesty I didn't think you could have a bank account at 15.
#23
RonChew
GAVINLEWISHUKD
Mark2111
I can understand their might be legal complications if the missing person is an adult but as he is a child, the access to his Facebook should be given to the police.
The boy had limited funds, left his mobile at home, it stands to reason that someone is helping him.
He may have left willingly but his whereabouts and safety need to be confirmed.
At 15 he thinks he knows it all and he may well be an intelligent and capable lad but in today's world he is vunerable and may fall prey to those with no morals or scruples.
But your missing the point. His express wish was not to try and find him.
Taking a phone, passport and loads of money sets no challenge. Look at how much he has achieved, nobody has a clue.
Great adventures start from humble beginnings.
So I say good luck to him. :)
He didn't take his phone or his passport and, for all his parents know, he could be dead by now. I assume that you're not old enough to have children. (_;)

Did you even read what was written before replying? He has purposely not taken them as its a) Easy to track b) Too easy (sets no challenge).

When he is back and gets a book deal you can read all about it. Until then let him have his adventure.

Ps. If I lived on a council estate I'd be old enough to be a grandad! :)
1 Like #24
MrScotchBonnet
RonChew
MrScotchBonnet
£350? How's a 15 year old have access to that?
Have you heard of bank accounts? My kids could have laid their hands on more cash than that at 15 so I'm sure lots of others could as well.
In all honesty I didn't think you could have a bank account at 15.

From 11 years old at Nationwide (Current Account).
#25
GAVINLEWISHUKD
Mark2111
I can understand their might be legal complications if the missing person is an adult but as he is a child, the access to his Facebook should be given to the police.
The boy had limited funds, left his mobile at home, it stands to reason that someone is helping him.
He may have left willingly but his whereabouts and safety need to be confirmed.
At 15 he thinks he knows it all and he may well be an intelligent and capable lad but in today's world he is vunerable and may fall prey to those with no morals or scruples.
But your missing the point. His express wish was not to try and find him.
Taking a phone, passport and loads of money sets no challenge. Look at how much he has achieved, nobody has a clue.
Great adventures start from humble beginnings.
So I say good luck to him. :)


Of course we are all hoping he is having some great adventure.

But, the world has changed. My son and other young relatives looked for casual work whilst they were at Uni and had ro jump through hoops to provide ID before they were even given a sniff at a job!

Years ago you could knock on people's doors and ask for cash in hand jobs, wash the car, cut the grass, fish up the garden, any kind of manual labour job but nowadays most of us are suspicious and would not hire some chap at the door.

How is the by paying for a roof over his head? It would be fantastic if he is living off the land and camping in the wilderness and doing ok but the reality is that it's now winter, the boy as resourceful as h may be is unlikely to fend for himself in the wild.

I hope someone is providing him with accommodation and he is safe and well.

He doesn't appear to wish his parents ill will according to the tone of the letter so a caring and responsible adult would encourage him to get word through that he is ok.

Of course there is the scenario that he had every intention of ending his life but thought it kinder to let his parents think he was on an adventure.

His parents and family are suffering not knowing if he is ok or not.
#26
Social media and its ilk should remain private. The police should request the information and Facebook should only provide if the law demands that it must.
#27
I was referring more to Facebook refusing to divulge any information, not that using Facebook might have led to disappearance. I hate the way they stand by their 'principles' as in this case, yet allow known terrorists and the like to use their site as a platform from which they preach their filth.
#28
MrScotchBonnet
RonChew
MrScotchBonnet
£350? How's a 15 year old have access to that?
Have you heard of bank accounts? My kids could have laid their hands on more cash than that at 15 so I'm sure lots of others could as well.
In all honesty I didn't think you could have a bank account at 15.

Yeah the accounts for 11+ with the Halifax, come with proper Visa Debit cards too, they have the ability to go overdrawn too which isn't the best thing for young people.
#29
haritori
MrScotchBonnet
RonChew
MrScotchBonnet
£350? How's a 15 year old have access to that?
Have you heard of bank accounts? My kids could have laid their hands on more cash than that at 15 so I'm sure lots of others could as well.
In all honesty I didn't think you could have a bank account at 15.
Yeah the accounts for 11+ with the Halifax, come with proper Visa Debit cards too, they have the ability to go overdrawn too which isn't the best thing for young people.

Blimey.
#30
deeky
Can't we just close Facegod down?
deeky
I was referring more to Facebook refusing to divulge any information, not that using Facebook might have led to disappearance. I hate the way they stand by their 'principles' as in this case, yet allow known terrorists and the like to use their site as a platform from which they preach their filth.

If terrorists &/or those preaching hate/dissemination were banned from Facebook/WhatsApp, Twitter, Short Message Service [SMS] text messaging, & so on, those using these social media networks would find other "underground" channels to continue their activities.

The alternate channels may not as easy for national/international security/intelligence services to intercept & track individuals. The information would go unmonitored leading to a greater risk of attacks.
#31
haritori

Yeah the accounts for 11+ with the Halifax, come with proper Visa Debit cards too, they have the ability to go overdrawn too which isn't the best thing for young people.

oO

When did the law change to allow that? It wasn't that long ago that you needed to be 18 to get a 'proper' debit card as opposed to something like an Electron card which doesn't let you go overdrawn.




Edited By: spoo on Nov 12, 2016 22:04
#32
spoo
haritori

Yeah the accounts for 11+ with the Halifax, come with proper Visa Debit cards too, they have the ability to go overdrawn too which isn't the best thing for young people.
oO
When did the law change to allow that? It wasn't that long ago that you needed to be 18 to get a 'proper' debit card as opposed to something like an Electron card which doesn't let you go overdrawn.

Yeah I opened my boys accounts last year, and they were issued full on Visa Debit cards.. I was 18 when i got a switch card prior to that it was only a cash card,

I think Visa are getting rid of Electron it was supposed to be a must be present card but it affected online use, so Visa Debit & Credit are the only cards being issued now on most accounts, although I could be wrong.

Edited By: haritori on Nov 12, 2016 22:09
#33
I really don't believe this boy is going it alone. Someone is supporting him.
#34
haritori
spoo
haritori

Yeah the accounts for 11+ with the Halifax, come with proper Visa Debit cards too, they have the ability to go overdrawn too which isn't the best thing for young people.
oO
When did the law change to allow that? It wasn't that long ago that you needed to be 18 to get a 'proper' debit card as opposed to something like an Electron card which doesn't let you go overdrawn.
Yeah I opened my boys accounts last year, and they were issued full on Visa Debit cards.. I was 18 when i got a switch card prior to that it was only a cash card,
I think Visa are getting rid of Electron it was supposed to be a must be present card but it affected online use, so Visa Debit & Credit are the only cards being issued now on most accounts, although I could be wrong.
Some Visa cards won't let you go overdrawn. I suspect that it is these that the Halifax are giving to under 18s. I mean, who in their right minds is going to give overdraft facilities to someone who has no legal obligation to repay it? Even the Halifax aren't that stupid, are they?
1 Like #35
RonChew
haritori
spoo
haritori

Yeah the accounts for 11+ with the Halifax, come with proper Visa Debit cards too, they have the ability to go overdrawn too which isn't the best thing for young people.
oO
When did the law change to allow that? It wasn't that long ago that you needed to be 18 to get a 'proper' debit card as opposed to something like an Electron card which doesn't let you go overdrawn.
Yeah I opened my boys accounts last year, and they were issued full on Visa Debit cards.. I was 18 when i got a switch card prior to that it was only a cash card,
I think Visa are getting rid of Electron it was supposed to be a must be present card but it affected online use, so Visa Debit & Credit are the only cards being issued now on most accounts, although I could be wrong.
Some Visa cards won't let you go overdrawn. I suspect that it is these that the Halifax are giving to under 18s. I mean, who in their right minds is going to give overdraft facilities to someone who has no legal obligation to repay it? Even the Halifax aren't that stupid, are they?

They dont give an overdraft facility, but we were warned its possible to go overdrawn,

example...

Pay at the pump only takes £1.00 from debit cards and then 2-3 days later then full amount to a max of £99.00

also some retailers (McDonalds is one I know of) payments under £5.00 can be auto authorised on debit cards regardless of funds available..

my kids don't use their cards like that though, they are money for spending money and for them to buy from Steam or XBOX Live, or save up, but it is possible and Halifax did warn me when I opened them.
#36
fanpages

If terrorists &/or those preaching hate/dissemination were banned from Facebook/WhatsApp, Twitter, Short Message Service [SMS] text messaging, & so on, those using these social media networks would find other "underground" channels to continue their activities.

You don't think serious terrorist groups will already have thought of that? I'd be amazed if the real nitty-gritty groups weren't already underground.

But surely the easy availability of the kind of social media sites we are talking about makes recruitment a lot easier than it would be if potential recruits had to trawl through the Dark Web to find information.

I wonder how many current terrorists wouldn't be terrorists if they hadn't been attracted to filth groups on FB/Twitter etc?

Edited By: deeky on Nov 12, 2016 23:16
1 Like #37
Mark2111

Arthur is 15 and he has by all accounts, run away. He left a letter for his parents and has not taken his passport.
His family have heard nothing from him. They have physically searched different places etc and are currently in the news making appeals.
And the family has since discovered that, the night before he left home, Arthur was on his Facebook account and may have been in contact with an unknown person. They and the police have pleaded with the social network company to release this information but, to date, Facebook has refused.
His mother Caroline is at pains to explain why she believes this Facebook link is so vital.
'Arthur left without his passport or his phone and only £350,' says Caroline. 'Normally, kids are tracked in 45 hours either by their phone or on CCTV, but what's extraordinary is it's now been nine-and-a-half weeks and there's been no contact from him at all. No sightings. No CCTV footage. We visited towns along the South Coast, we've been to Manchester, Liverpool, London.
'We've contacted homeless organisations, coach stations, hospitals, train stations — anywhere we can think of to put up posters, but we've heard nothing.
'That's why this Facebook link is so crucial. We just need them to release information to the police so they can see if he's been in contact with someone.'
Should Facebook be forced to reveal the in formation to the police?
I think they should.


Found safe and well just 10 miles from home after 10 weeks. Two very relieved parents I would imagine.:)
3 Likes #38
I would be relieved but would kick his bony a***
3 Likes #39
Glad he's been found. The family need some honest and open conversations or I fear this might happen again. Teenagers are so hard to deal with because they are such a mixture of hormones and between childhood and adulthood. They are often idealistic and have fixed opinions and are loathed to listen to their parents and take advantage of their experience. They were definitely the hardest years with our two and thank goodness we all came out the other side. I have two wonderful young adults now who are kind and decent people but I do have to dye my hair every few weeks !!

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