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Free Gary McKinnon or at least give him a fair trial in the United Kingdom

casparwhite Avatar
7y, 10m agoPosted 7 years, 10 months ago
Gary McKinnon's extradition Judicial Review hearing is due on Tuesday 20th January 2009 - the same day that George Bush officially hands over to Barack Obama as US President

you may remember seeing him on the news as the guy who hacked into the pentagon well this still hasnt been resolved and its about time this was put to bed and he is left to stop worrying about what the yanks will do to him once over there!

Gary McKinnon is a UK citizen who has admitted accessing US Government computers in 2001 in an attempt to gain information on UFOs. No other country has such limited protections from extradition for its citizens as the UK in its arrangements with the US.

The US authorities have taken the dramatic step of categorising Gary's behaviour as Cyber-Terrorism and as a consequence there is a real risk of him being detained pre-trial and, in the event of a conviction, in a high security "Supermax" prison. The suitability of such treatment in the case of a computer hacker is debatable, but for someone with Gary's condition, which causes social awkwardness and inappropriate honesty and interpersonal behaviour it will be life threatening and is both unnecessary and disproportionate.

Gary has never set foot in the USA and as a UK citizen is prepared to be tried through the British judicial system.
Whatever the rights or wrongs of Gary's actions, all UK citizens alleged to have committed criminal acts on UK soil should be tried in a front of a jury of their peers in the UK.

sign the petition here:Online petition - Petition to Stop the Gary McKinnon extradition to the United States
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casparwhite Avatar
7y, 10m agoPosted 7 years, 10 months ago
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#2
I 100% agree that he should have to go through the uk system not us.
#3
the uk is ridiculous when it comes to looking after its citizens....treated like second class

if it wa the other way around the us would fight tooth and nail!!

even in bang kwang thailand the prisoners there who have been found guilty of drug offences if they are us citizens after 8 years they get to go back to the us and they do 8 years the the us prson system and then are released!

the uk on the other hand forces them to do their full time back in the uk unlike every other country in europe
#4
Ah, ******* to Gary McKinnon. He hacked into their systems, messed around with them, found info that could've killed people, and left messages behind to taunt them. He did this over the course of a couple of years. He knew exactly what he was doing, and he knew exactly how the American agencies would respond when they noticed and traced him. He got too confident, he got caught. Now he's going to go down for it, in exactly the way that everyone in the entire world would expect to happen if they were to mess with The Pentagon. Seriously, he got root access on Pentagon computers, which is about the highest level of computer hack imaginable. He had the ability to cripple the US military. He even acted with this ability on one occasion, he claims. What did he think was going to happen?
#5
**** that send him to guantanamo or wherever you call it.
#6
dxx
Ah, bollox to Gary McKinnon. He hacked into their systems, messed around with them, found info that could've killed people, and left messages behind to taunt them. He did this over the course of a couple of years. He knew exactly what he was doing, and he knew exactly how the American agencies would respond when they noticed and traced him. He got too confident, he got caught. Now he's going to go down for it, in exactly the way that everyone in the entire world would expect to happen if they were to mess with The Pentagon. Seriously, he got root access on Pentagon computers, which is about the highest level of computer hack imaginable. He had the ability to cripple the US military. He even acted with this ability on one occasion, he claims. What did he think was going to happen?


^^What they said!
#7
dxx
Ah, bollox to Gary McKinnon. He hacked into their systems, messed around with them, found info that could've killed people, and left messages behind to taunt them. He did this over the course of a couple of years. He knew exactly what he was doing, and he knew exactly how the American agencies would respond when they noticed and traced him. He got too confident, he got caught. Now he's going to go down for it, in exactly the way that everyone in the entire world would expect to happen if they were to mess with The Pentagon. Seriously, he got root access on Pentagon computers, which is about the highest level of computer hack imaginable. He had the ability to cripple the US military. He even acted with this ability on one occasion, he claims. What did he think was going to happen?


As much as I agree with everything you've said there, the thing I dont like the most is that the US dont have to give an extradition reason to the UK government to have a UK citizen extradited to the US, whereas the UK do have to give a reason to the US. So if the US accuse a UK citizen of something like this they dont have to proove it before they request the extradition, and becuase of the agreement between the UK and US, the UK Government as usual drop their trousers to the US and let them go to town.

If anything should be petitioned, it should be the ceasing of this so called extradition agreement. :)
#8
he hacked into us computers almost 7 years ago and he used dial up internet connection which is miles slower than todays broadband connection
He did not have any expensive eqipment or tools of any sort only a common commerical application widely available to anyone

pentagon had no passwords and no firewalls, so their computers were not secured proprerly and the us tech staff were obviously negligent and not doin there jobs properly as exposed by gary

he should not be extradited for this and should be ytrialed here in the uk in my opinion

extradition should only be used for murder and the like and not for hacking into computers when causing no harm which he coul quite easily of done

our government bend over backwards to do anything the us tell them to and fail to look after its citizens...

at the end of the day he did no harm and showed the pentagon up for being pretty useless and its a good job

coz if somebody with real bad intentions wanted to do it we could all be screwed

guess what he pretty much told them hed been there and done it
banned#9
StevenA2000_uk;4000429
As much as I agree with everything you've said there, the thing I dont like the most is that the US dont have to give an extradition reason to the UK government to have a UK citizen extradited to the US, whereas the UK do have to give a reason to the US. So if the US accuse a UK citizen of something like this they dont have to proove it before they request the extradition, and becuase of the agreement between the UK and US, the UK Government as usual drop their trousers to the US and let them go to town.

If anything should be petitioned, it should be the ceasing of this so called extradition agreement. :)

totally agree. This is where the real injustice lies. :thumbsup:

I'll sign the petition for this reason alone!
#10
csiman
totally agree. This is where the real injustice lies. :thumbsup:

I'll sign the petition for this reason alone!


thats pretty much the point in a nutshell
banned#11
casparwhite


pentagon had no passwords and no firewalls, so their computers were not secured proprerly and the us tech staff were obviously negligent and not doin there jobs properly as exposed by gary


I am going to look for a car in a car park at lunch time that's unlocked. Then I'll steal it.

I'll use your argument as my defence in court.
#12
DanJackson
I am going to look for a car in a car park at lunch time that's unlocked. Then I'll steal it.

I'll use your argument as my defence in court.


its not an argument kid

the point is if the car was made in america, should you be sent there for stealing that car when you stole it here in the uk?

its about extradition or did you miss the point being made with your smart witty comment?
banned#13
DanJackson;4000777
I am going to look for a car in a car park at lunch time that's unlocked. Then I'll steal it.

I'll use your argument as my defence in court.

DFTT! :p
1 Like #14
DanJackson;4000777
I am going to look for a car in a car park at lunch time that's unlocked. Then I'll steal it.

I'll use your argument as my defence in court.


Go for it :thumbsup:
because your totally missing the point.

Gary didn't steal the car he left a note inside saying that it had been unlocked.
#15
A crime is a crime, too late whinging now, he got cocky and deserves it, hacking isn't some by chance encounter, it requires good knowledge and intelligence, shame his common sense didn't prevail.
#16
phatboy123
Go for it :thumbsup:
because your totally missing the point.

Gary didn't steal the car he left a note inside saying that it had been unlocked.


But he didn't say what info he got from the car though....................fail
#17
Alfonse
But he didn't say what info he got from the car though....................fail


no he didnt because he just told them it was unlocked and could of stolen the nuclear weapons left inside

giving them a heads up not to do it again:whistling:

hardly worth a 100 year prison sentence in a maximum security prison lol
#18
casparwhite
he hacked into us computers almost 7 years ago and he used dial up internet connection which is miles slower than todays broadband connection
He did not have any expensive eqipment or tools of any sort only a common commerical application widely available to anyone

pentagon had no passwords and no firewalls, so their computers were not secured proprerly and the us tech staff were obviously negligent and not doin there jobs properly as exposed by gary

he should not be extradited for this and should be ytrialed here in the uk in my opinion

extradition should only be used for murder and the like and not for hacking into computers when causing no harm which he coul quite easily of done

our government bend over backwards to do anything the us tell them to and fail to look after its citizens...

at the end of the day he did no harm and showed the pentagon up for being pretty useless and its a good job

coz if somebody with real bad intentions wanted to do it we could all be screwed

guess what he pretty much told them hed been there and done it


1) The whole dial-up thing seems to be one of the major points on which the McKinnon sympathy case lives on. Thing is though, it's meaningless, and it's just a weak attempt to get sympathy and to make him seem harmless. It's false. When you're hacking using SSH with a client like Putty, since it's a text-only interface, bandwidth use is minimal. With dial-up, you get about 4KB/s. A directory listing is typically within the 1KB to 2KB range, a large text file no more than a dozen KB. The campaign wants to make out that Gary's dial-up experience would be as painfully slow as your experience would be of the modern internet at dial-up speeds. But that's just not true. In reality, it'd be like sitting at the hacked computer, only a little laggier.

2) You don't need expensive commercial apps to hack. In fact, I don't think there are any, owing to the technical knowledge of hackers, and the fact that any company selling hack tools would be sued or swooped upon by the Pentagon. Instead, you just use tools, most of which you write yourself. Gary used one Perl script to scan for systems that had blank passwords (simple as trying all IP addresses within a set range, and sending an agent, probably Putty, to log in with blank password, and then closing the conneciton and piping the output to a text file for review later, wouldn't take more than ten minutes to write), and presumably Putty, which allows hackers access using a command-line interface like DOS, as if they were sitting in front of the system. He was a clever boy, he knew exactly what he was doing.

3) They were negligent. But an open door is not an invitation to walk in and steal things. If someone walked into my house through my front door, they should fully expect a hearty hit to the back of the head with a metal bar. Likewise, the Pentagon. Except Dxx's trustry metal bar replaced with gitmo bay.

4) Why? He broke the law virtually in America. He attacked the US military. As he wasn't an agent of any army he was a solo combatant, therefore a terrorist, and the rules are a little different for them. Likewise, if someone in Afghanistan was hacking the Pentagon's systems, do you really think it would be the best idea to let the Afghanistani legal system deal with him, knowing that they'll give him maybe a slap on the wrist or just let him go free? Face up to the real world, man.

5) He claims he did cause harm and that he did impede operation at the Pentagon. Of course, he claimed this before he got caught. He claims to have been a lot more passive these days.

So, yarr. In summary, don't trust McKinnon. He's highly deceptive. He knew exactly what he was doing, knew exactly what the consequences would be. There is no justification for his actions. He's going down, and it's entirely his own fault.
#19
hell prob just end up workin for them anyway, bye gary....enjoy ur suntan!
#20
dxx
1) The whole dial-up thing seems to be one of the major points on which the McKinnon sympathy case lives on. Thing is though, it's meaningless, and it's just a weak attempt to get sympathy and to make him seem harmless. It's false. When you're hacking using SSH with a client like Putty, since it's a text-only interface, bandwidth use is minimal. With dial-up, you get about 4KB/s. A directory listing is typically within the 1KB to 2KB range, a large text file no more than a dozen KB. The campaign wants to make out that Gary's dial-up experience would be as painfully slow as your experience would be of the modern internet at dial-up speeds. But that's just not true. In reality, it'd be like sitting at the hacked computer, only a little laggier.

2) You don't need expensive commercial apps to hack. In fact, I don't think there are any, owing to the technical knowledge of hackers, and the fact that any company selling hack tools would be sued or swooped upon by the Pentagon. Instead, you just use tools, most of which you write yourself. Gary used one Perl script to scan for systems that had blank passwords (simple as trying all IP addresses within a set range, and sending an agent, probably Putty, to log in with blank password, and then closing the conneciton and piping the output to a text file for review later, wouldn't take more than ten minutes to write), and presumably Putty, which allows hackers access using a command-line interface like DOS, as if they were sitting in front of the system. He was a clever boy, he knew exactly what he was doing.

3) They were negligent. But an open door is not an invitation to walk in and steal things. If someone walked into my house through my front door, they should fully expect a hearty hit to the back of the head with a metal bar. Likewise, the Pentagon. Except Dxx's trustry metal bar replaced with gitmo bay.

4) Why? He broke the law virtually in America. He attacked the US military. As he wasn't an agent of any army he was a solo combatant, therefore a terrorist, and the rules are a little different for them. Likewise, if someone in Afghanistan was hacking the Pentagon's systems, do you really think it would be the best idea to let the Afghanistani legal system deal with him, knowing that they'll give him maybe a slap on the wrist or just let him go free? Face up to the real world, man.

5) He claims he did cause harm and that he did impede operation at the Pentagon. Of course, he claimed this before he got caught. He claims to have been a lot more passive these days.

So, yarr. In summary, don't trust McKinnon. He's highly deceptive. He knew exactly what he was doing, knew exactly what the consequences would be. There is no justification for his actions. He's going down, and it's entirely his own fault.


well said :thumbsup:
#21
dxx
1) The whole dial-up thing seems to be one of the major points on which the McKinnon sympathy case lives on. Thing is though, it's meaningless, and it's just a weak attempt to get sympathy and to make him seem harmless. It's false. When you're hacking using SSH with a client like Putty, since it's a text-only interface, bandwidth use is minimal. With dial-up, you get about 4KB/s. A directory listing is typically within the 1KB to 2KB range, a large text file no more than a dozen KB. The campaign wants to make out that Gary's dial-up experience would be as painfully slow as your experience would be of the modern internet at dial-up speeds. But that's just not true. In reality, it'd be like sitting at the hacked computer, only a little laggier.

2) You don't need expensive commercial apps to hack. In fact, I don't think there are any, owing to the technical knowledge of hackers, and the fact that any company selling hack tools would be sued or swooped upon by the Pentagon. Instead, you just use tools, most of which you write yourself. Gary used one Perl script to scan for systems that had blank passwords (simple as trying all IP addresses within a set range, and sending an agent, probably Putty, to log in with blank password, and then closing the conneciton and piping the output to a text file for review later, wouldn't take more than ten minutes to write), and presumably Putty, which allows hackers access using a command-line interface like DOS, as if they were sitting in front of the system. He was a clever boy, he knew exactly what he was doing.

3) They were negligent. But an open door is not an invitation to walk in and steal things. If someone walked into my house through my front door, they should fully expect a hearty hit to the back of the head with a metal bar. Likewise, the Pentagon. Except Dxx's trustry metal bar replaced with gitmo bay.

4) Why? He broke the law virtually in America. He attacked the US military. As he wasn't an agent of any army he was a solo combatant, therefore a terrorist, and the rules are a little different for them. Likewise, if someone in Afghanistan was hacking the Pentagon's systems, do you really think it would be the best idea to let the Afghanistani legal system deal with him, knowing that they'll give him maybe a slap on the wrist or just let him go free? Face up to the real world, man.

5) He claims he did cause harm and that he did impede operation at the Pentagon. Of course, he claimed this before he got caught. He claims to have been a lot more passive these days.

So, yarr. In summary, don't trust McKinnon. He's highly deceptive. He knew exactly what he was doing, knew exactly what the consequences would be. There is no justification for his actions. He's going down, and it's entirely his own fault.


1. sitting at the pentagon computers but a little laggier....lmao he should never of been able to get that far....he exposed the poor security for what it was......leave your door open while you go out and luckily someone goes in and leaves you a note saying somebody could of stole all your stuff without taking anything......you would be twice as unlikely to do it again!!

2. if gary could do it from his bedroom with nothing.... what could someone who actually wanted to do some harm with decent equipment do exactly?

3. he walked in and you were out playing soldiers elsewhere........ leaving the worlds largest military force and nuclear stash available for anybody to play around with .... bit late with that metal bar when world war 3 has started

4. hardly a comparison afganistan who have just flown several planes into a number of buildings and killed thousands of people and gary who left a note saying.... hi, only me!!
uk vs afganistan legal system hmmmmm

5. what did he actually do again? tell people that he could hack into the pentagon......wow
the us is just embarrased by the whole situation it should of never been able to happen in the first place

so on conclusion blah blah blah he stopped the pentagon from being hacked by someone who could of done some real harm and saved us all from destruction

he should be awarded the highest medal available for saving all mankind and exposing the yanks for what they really are....... a bunch of idiots!


maybe he dererves to got prison but not what the yanks plan to do with him.......like he would get a fair trial over there with their corruption and illegal torture techniques pah

british citizens have rights
#22
casparwhite
1. sitting at the pentagon computers but a little laggier....lmao he should never of been able to get that far....he exposed the poor security for what it was......leave your door open while you go out and luckily someone goes in and leaves you a note saying somebody could of stole all your stuff without taking anything......you would be twice as unlikely to do it again!!

2. if gary could do it from his bedroom with nothing.... what could someone who actually wanted to do some harm with decent equipment do exactly?

3. he walked in and you were out playing soldiers elsewhere........ leaving the worlds largest military force and nuclear stash available for anybody to play around with .... bit late with that metal bar when world war 3 has started

4. hardly a comparison afganistan who have just flown several planes into a number of buildings and killed thousands of people and gary who left a note saying.... hi, only me!!
uk vs afganistan legal system hmmmmm

5. what did he actually do again? tell people that he could hack into the pentagon......wow
the us is just embarrased by the whole situation it should of never been able to happen in the first place

so on conclusion blah blah blah he stopped the pentagon from being hacked by someone who could of done some real harm and saved us all from destruction

he should be awarded the highest medal available for saving all mankind and exposing the yanks for what they really are....... a bunch of idiots!


Okay, let's get back to my metal bar. Strange to think that I nearly threw it out last week in a clear-out on the grounds that my wrecking bar (basically a crow bar, but smaller, and a better fit for the hand) was smaller and harder, but I knew my metal bar might come in handy somewhere, so I kept it. I had no idea that an entire online argument would soon hinge upon it.

Anyway, getting back to my metal bar, if I were to step out of my house with it, I would within a couple of minutes see either a small child or an old lady walking along my road. Obviously, I'm not going to attack someone younger and stronger than me because they could defend themselves, so I'm going to have to attack an old biddy instead, purely to prove a point. And the point is, self-defense only helps a victim so much. The law exists to save that victim from being targeted in the first place, and if someone chooses to break the law, they must accept the consequences of breaking it.

Now, in my scenario, I am McKinnon, my metal bar is Putty, and the old granny is the Pentagon. Under your logic, it is quite okay for me to beat the old granny with the metal bar because she is incapable of defending herself. In fact, you even go as far as to justify the attack because the old granny cannot defend herself, and you even seem to believe that I should be let off because she wasn't capable of defending herself. Do you see the connections in the analogy here, and see now how wrong you are?

I do agree with your point that the Pentagon should never have had such poor security, and the one-way extradition thing is indeed unfair. But the root of this whole debate is the simple fact that McKinnon pulled off an incredibly high-profile hack, and regardless of how easy it was, he now has to be punished for it. It's how society works. Break the rules, get punished. If the rules are easy to break it changes nothing, you still have to be punished, and not just for your own sakes, but so that other people know not to mess in future.

I agree that it's a shame that McKinnon's now thrown the rest of his life away, and this is a truely horrific thought, but he knew what he was getting into when he started. If he was sensible, he'd not have hacked in at all. If he was only a little stupid, he'd have just hacked in once. He instead made it his evening's hobby for two years. He got caught. Fair game.
#23
I thought he only hacked a few low level computers that didnt contain much information?
#24
I am McKinnon, my metal bar is Putty, and the old granny is the Pentagon. Under your logic, it is quite okay for me to beat the old granny with the metal bar because she is incapable of defending herself. In fact, you even go as far as to justify the attack because the old granny cannot defend herself, and you even seem to believe that I should be let off because she wasn't capable of defending herself. Do you see the connections in the analogy here, and see now how wrong you are?


lmao the pentagon is certainly no old granny and if it were she should have a few proverbial brick toilets around her if she was that old and frail for protection if shes walking down the street with the crown jewels

you dont see the queen doing that now do you?

nope and shes a national treasure to some...

fact is he should be dealt with over here, he did no harm at the end of the day and he should be employed by someone to make use of his extroadinary talents not flung in a soon to be non existant terror camp...
banned#25
casparwhite

fact is he should be dealt with over here, he did no harm at the end of the day and he should be employed by someone to make use of his extroadinary talents not flung in a soon to be non existant terror camp...


But why should he be tried over here? He entered, albeit remotely, high level American systems on American soil used by American citizens to protect American citizens.

He has commited a serious crime in their country and because some nerds in this country have got their Metallica t-shirts all twisted and spilt Red Bull on their keyboards we should say "OK, lets keep him here so he doesn't get a harsh sentence."

Not only has he commited a serious crime in another country, but he has also admitted to it. Whether or not there were no serious consequences to his actions is irrelevent.

Yes, the one way extradition might be "unfair" but ultimately, that's the way it works at the moment and if it affects him, tough.
#26
casparwhite
no he didnt because he just told them it was unlocked and could of stolen the nuclear weapons left inside

giving them a heads up not to do it again:whistling:

hardly worth a 100 year prison sentence in a maximum security prison lol


just because you can, doesn't make it right

you can't pretend to rob a bank, not take any money then turn round and say your security measures are rubbish to get away with it!!!

duh
#27
anybody who can get 1 over the american goverment is alright in my book but it would appear we have some yankie doodle dandies here who support the american government policies....

robbing a bank is something anybody can do but the chance sof you getting away with it are extremely remote whatever the circumstances....

now exposing supposedly the most secure building in the world to be nothing but a frail old granny carrying the crown jewels....priceless

im sure if you had the knowledge to do something like that you would but unfortuantly there has been and only will ever be 1 man to ever do so..

and guess what ?...... he is british

if i were king he would be knighted
#28
look..he didnt stumble across the pentagon server during a google search for flip flops, He set out to infiltrate the biggest superpower in the world, They HAVE to set an example that this will not be tolerated in the future.
#29
the yanks chould be giving him cigars and shaking his hand!! beacuse he got in there and showed them the flaws before the terroists did!!!

proper agencies pay people to do this job yet he did it for free!!
#30
kungfu
look..he didnt stumble across the pentagon server during a google search for flip flops, He set out to infiltrate the biggest superpower in the world, They HAVE to set an example that this will not be tolerated in the future.


im sure if he had the knowledge to do it in the first place he could of hidden his tracks also but he left them a note

not really the actions of a terrorist or somebody that was expecting this to be dragged out for 7 years so far do you think?

whats with all the support for america anyway:thinking:
#31
casparwhite
anybody who can get 1 over the american goverment is alright in my book but it would appear we have some yankie doodle dandies here who support the american government policies....

robbing a bank is something anybody can do but the chance sof you getting away with it are extremely remote whatever the circumstances....

now exposing supposedly the most secure building in the world to be nothing but a frail old granny carrying the crown jewels....priceless

im sure if you had the knowledge to do something like that you would but unfortuantly there has been and only will ever be 1 man to ever do so..

and guess what ?...... he is british

if i were king he would be knighted


it doesn't matter what country you commit a crime in you still are bound by those Laws be it the US, China, Belgium, Middle East etc etc

If hacking is ok in your book then your home PC doesn't have a firewall so you let them merrily into your computer to leave you little notes and only look at your info not take anything, cos thats ok isn't it?

lol
banned#32
casparwhite
anybody who can get 1 over the american goverment is alright in my book but it would appear we have some yankie doodle dandies here who support the american government policies....

and guess what ?...... he is british

if i were king he would be knighted


Perhaps it's best if you go back to reading The Sun and leave the intelligent arguments to the adults who can read.
#33
Alfonse
it doesn't matter what country you commit a crime in you still are bound by those Laws be it the US, China, Belgium, Middle East etc etc

If hacking is ok in your book then your home PC doesn't have a firewall so you let them merrily into your computer to leave you little notes and only look at your info not take anything, cos thats ok isn't it?

lol


do you actually know what he was looking for btw?

you do know he stumbled across nasa and the pentagon by accident because of there uselesness

you seem to be looking for an argument without actually knowing any of the facts lol

oh yeah i dont keep anything on my computer that i would not be prepared to lose for a start
#34
a little background from the man himself from a bbc interview he did for the pople who have no idea lol

In 2002, Gary McKinnon was arrested by the UK's national high-tech crime unit, after being accused of hacking into Nasa and the US military computer networks.

He says he spent two years looking for photographic evidence of alien spacecraft and advanced power technology.

America now wants to put him on trial, and if tried there he could face 60 years behind bars.

Banned from using the internet, Gary spoke to Click presenter Spencer Kelly to tell his side of the story, ahead of his extradition hearing on Wednesday, 10 May. You can read what he had to say here.

Spencer Kelly: Here's your list of charges: you hacked into the Army, the Navy, the Air Force, the Department of Defense, and Nasa, amongst other things. Why?

Gary McKinnon: I was in search of suppressed technology, laughingly referred to as UFO technology. I think it's the biggest kept secret in the world because of its comic value, but it's a very important thing.

Old-age pensioners can't pay their fuel bills, countries are invaded to award oil contracts to the West, and meanwhile secretive parts of the secret government are sitting on suppressed technology for free energy.

SK: How did you go about trying to find the stuff you were looking for in Nasa, in the Department of Defense?

GM: Unlike the press would have you believe, it wasn't very clever. I searched for blank passwords, I wrote a tiny Perl script that tied together other people's programs that search for blank passwords, so you could scan 65,000 machines in just over eight minutes.

SK: So you're saying that you found computers which had a high-ranking status, administrator status, which hadn't had their passwords set - they were still set to default?

GM: Yes, precisely.

SK: Were you the only hacker to make it past the slightly lower-than-expected lines of defence?

GM: Yes, exactly, there were no lines of defence. There was a permanent tenancy of foreign hackers. You could run a command when you were on the machine that showed connections from all over the world, check the IP address to see if it was another military base or whatever, and it wasn't.

The General Accounting Office in America has again published another damning report saying that federal security is very, very poor.

SK: Over what kind of period were you hacking into these computers? Was it a one-time only, or for the course of a week?

UFO?
A bird or a plane?... Gary was not able to get a picture of what he saw
GM: Oh no, it was a couple of years.

SK: And you went unnoticed for a couple of years?

GM: Oh yes. I used to be careful about the hours.

SK: So you would log on in the middle of the night, say?

GM: Yes, I'd always be juggling different time zones. Doing it at night time there's hopefully not many people around. But there was one occasion when a network engineer saw me and actually questioned me and we actually talked to each other via WordPad, which was very, very strange.

SK: So what did he say? And what did you say?

GM: He said "What are you doing?" which was a bit shocking. I told him I was from Military Computer Security, which he fully believed.

SK: Did you find what you were looking for?

GM: Yes.

SK: Tell us about it.

GM: There was a group called the Disclosure Project. They published a book which had 400 expert witnesses ranging from civilian air traffic controllers, through military radar operators, right up to the chaps who were responsible for whether or not to launch nuclear missiles.

They are some very credible, relied upon people, all saying yes, there is UFO technology, there's anti-gravity, there's free energy, and it's extra-terrestrial in origin, and we've captured spacecraft and reverse-engineered it.

SK: What did you find inside Nasa?

GM: One of these people was a Nasa photographic expert, and she said that in building eight of Johnson Space Centre they regularly airbrushed out images of UFOs from the high-resolution satellite imaging. What she said was there was there: there were folders called "filtered" and "unfiltered", "processed" and "raw", something like that.

I got one picture out of the folder, and bearing in mind this is a 56k dial-up, so a very slow internet connection, in dial-up days, using the remote control programme I turned the colour down to 4bit colour and the screen resolution really, really low, and even then the picture was still juddering as it came onto the screen.

But what came on to the screen was amazing. It was a culmination of all my efforts. It was a picture of something that definitely wasn't man-made.

It was above the Earth's hemisphere. It kind of looked like a satellite. It was cigar-shaped and had geodesic domes above, below, to the left, the right and both ends of it, and although it was a low-resolution picture it was very close up.

This thing was hanging in space, the earth's hemisphere visible below it, and no rivets, no seams, none of the stuff associated with normal man-made manufacturing.

SK: Is it possible this is an artist's impression?

GM: I don't know... For me, it was more than a coincidence. This woman has said: "This is what happens, in this building, in this space centre". I went into that building, that space centre, and saw exactly that.

SK: Do you have a copy of this? It came down to your machine.

GM: No, the graphical remote viewer works frame by frame. It's a Java application, so there's nothing to save on your hard drive, or at least if it is, only one frame at a time.

SK: So did you get the one frame?

GM: No.

SK: What happened?

GM: Once I was cut off, my picture just disappeared.

SK: You were actually cut off the time you were downloading the picture?

GM: Yes, I saw the guy's hand move across.

SK: You acknowledge that what you did was against the law, it was wrong, don't you?

GM: Unauthorised access is against the law and it is wrong.

SK: What do you think is a suitable punishment for someone who did what you did?

GM: Firstly, because of what I was looking for, I think I was morally correct. Even though I regret it now, I think the free energy technology should be publicly available.

I want to be tried in my own country, under the Computer Misuse Act, and I want evidence brought forward, or at least want the Americans to have to provide evidence in order to extradite me, because I know there is no evidence of damage.

Nasa told Click that it does not discuss computer security issues or legal matters. It denied it would ever manipulate images in order to deceive and said it had a policy of open and full disclosure, adding it had no direct evidence of extra-terrestrial life.

banned#35
None of this would have happened if the Queen of Our Hearts and The Lady of Candles in The Wind Lady Queen Princess Diana of Wales was still alive.

God rest her.

Come back Diana! And bring Our Maddie with you, your country needs you both!
banned#36
casparwhite
a little background from the man himself from a bbc interview he did for the pople who have no idea lol
GM: Yes, I'd always be juggling different time zones. Doing it at night time there's hopefully not many people around. But there was one occasion when a network engineer saw me and actually questioned me and we actually talked to each other via WordPad, which was very, very strange.

SK: So what did he say? And what did you say?

GM: He said "What are you doing?" which was a bit shocking. I told him I was from Military Computer Security, which he fully believed.

SK: Did you find what you were looking for?

GM: Yes.

SK: Tell us about it.

GM: There was a group called the Disclosure Project. They published a book which had 400 expert witnesses ranging from civilian air traffic controllers, through military radar operators, right up to the chaps who were responsible for whether or not to launch nuclear missiles.

They are some very credible, relied upon people, all saying yes, there is UFO technology, there's anti-gravity, there's free energy, and it's extra-terrestrial in origin, and we've captured spacecraft and reverse-engineered it.

SK: What did you find inside Nasa?

GM: One of these people was a Nasa photographic expert, and she said that in building eight of Johnson Space Centre they regularly airbrushed out images of UFOs from the high-resolution satellite imaging. What she said was there was there: there were folders called "filtered" and "unfiltered", "processed" and "raw", something like that.

I got one picture out of the folder, and bearing in mind this is a 56k dial-up, so a very slow internet connection, in dial-up days, using the remote control programme I turned the colour down to 4bit colour and the screen resolution really, really low, and even then the picture was still juddering as it came onto the screen.

But what came on to the screen was amazing. It was a culmination of all my efforts. It was a picture of something that definitely wasn't man-made.

It was above the Earth's hemisphere. It kind of looked like a satellite. It was cigar-shaped and had geodesic domes above, below, to the left, the right and both ends of it, and although it was a low-resolution picture it was very close up.

This thing was hanging in space, the earth's hemisphere visible below it, and no rivets, no seams, none of the stuff associated with normal man-made manufacturing.

SK: Is it possible this is an artist's impression?

GM: I don't know... For me, it was more than a coincidence. This woman has said: "This is what happens, in this building, in this space centre". I went into that building, that space centre, and saw exactly that.

SK: Do you have a copy of this? It came down to your machine.

GM: No, the graphical remote viewer works frame by frame. It's a Java application, so there's nothing to save on your hard drive, or at least if it is, only one frame at a time.

SK: So did you get the one frame?

GM: No.

SK: What happened?

GM: Once I was cut off, my picture just disappeared.

SK: You were actually cut off the time you were downloading the picture?

GM: Yes, I saw the guy's hand move across.

SK: You acknowledge that what you did was against the law, it was wrong, don't you?

GM: Unauthorised access is against the law and it is wrong.

SK: What do you think is a suitable punishment for someone who did what you did?

GM: Firstly, because of what I was looking for, I think I was morally correct. Even though I regret it now, I think the free energy technology should be publicly available.

I want to be tried in my own country, under the Computer Misuse Act, and I want evidence brought forward, or at least want the Americans to have to provide evidence in order to extradite me, because I know there is no evidence of damage.

Nasa told Click that it does not discuss computer security issues or legal matters. It denied it would ever manipulate images in order to deceive and said it had a policy of open and full disclosure, adding it had no direct evidence of extra-terrestrial life.

[/B]


Anyone who knows anything about computers will tell you this part of his interview is known commonly as a "lie"
#37
DanJackson
Perhaps it's best if I go back to reading The Sun and leave the intelligent arguments to the adults who can read.


yeah you're probably right

off you trot then
banned#38
what you just posted sort of contradicts your previous posts
banned#39
sassie
what you just posted sort of contradicts your previous posts


If you're tlking to me, no it doesn't. He admits hacking, but what makes his side of things sound silly is when he makes up stories about how the hacking happened and what he saw. Then he just comes across as the mentalist he is.

It's one thing to admit to hacking the Pentagon, it's then a completely weirder thing to make up the details of what you "saw"
#40
casparwhite
do you actually know what he was looking for btw?

you do know he stumbled across nasa and the pentagon by accident because of there uselesness

you seem to be looking for an argument without actually knowing any of the facts lol

oh yeah i dont keep anything on my computer that i would not be prepared to lose for a start


lol, you don't know much really, of course I'm arguing with you. You seem to think its ok to break the law regardless. You then post up the lamest interview of a guy trying to worm out of a serious punishment by saying is was looking for UFOs on US military computers. It doesn't happen by mistake, as says he knew what he was looking for and that he knew he was breaking the law. end of.

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