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GCSE Psychology..

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Does anyone know where I can find the AQA answer sheet for the 2006 GCSE Higher Psychology paper? I want to check my answers against them. You can get them off the site but I can't find them. Read More
t0mm Avatar
9y, 3m agoPosted 9 years, 3 months ago
Does anyone know where I can find the AQA answer sheet for the 2006 GCSE Higher Psychology paper?

I want to check my answers against them.
You can get them off the site but I can't find them.
t0mm Avatar
9y, 3m agoPosted 9 years, 3 months ago
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#1
Phsychology is a GCSE subject now!!! :w00t:




PS No, sorry, don't know where you would get the papers you are looking for.
banned#4
have you got a mock coming up and you wanna check the answers?
#5
shibi din
Phsychology is a GCSE subject now!!! :w00t:



Shhht shibi!! You're showing your age!!! :p :giggle:
#7
crustyroad
have you got a mock coming up and you wanna check the answers?


yeah, but we have the paper because "it's too hard to revise alone" so we have to do it then check against this.
#8
Haha. What a joke. :p
#9
So your being given the answers?

Surely a GCSE cant be that difficult?
#10
Remember wen some mates did this for maths for there mocks i got a B whereas they still got a C.
#11
sadiebabes
Shhht shibi!! You're showing your age!!! :p :giggle:


Is it that obvious?!? :oops:
No, really, PSYCHOLOGY as a GCSE!!! What is this country coming to???? :?
I have heard, that it is almost impossible to fail an exam these days. Is that correct? In my day, you got an A if you were very good, a B if you were good, a C if you were okay and anything less than that (below 50%) was a fail. Quite a good way of doing things, I thought!!
#12
shibi din
Is it that obvious?!? :oops:
No, really, PSYCHOLOGY as a GCSE!!! What is this country coming to???? :?
I have heard, that it is almost impossible to fail an exam these days. Is that correct? In my day, you got an A if you were very good, a B if you were good, a C if you were okay and anything less than that (below 50%) was a fail. Quite a good way of doing things, I thought!!


Have you ever studied psychology?
#13
foxylady*
Have you ever studied psychology?


No, why?
#14
shibi din
No, why?


What do you think of psychology as a subject?
#15
foxylady*
What do you think of psychology as a subject?


Are you psychoanalysing me??
The reason for my amazement at Psychology being a GCSE is that I think of it as being a specialised subject, more suited to being studied at a much higher level of eduction, ie at university.
GCSE stands for General Certificate of Secondary Education and on those words alone I would have (and did) assumed that Psychology does not come into that category. :thinking:
#16
shibi din
Are you psychoanalysing me??
The reason for my amazement at Psychology being a GCSE is that I think of it as being a specialised subject, more suited to being studied at a much higher level of eduction, ie at university.
GCSE stands for General Certificate of Secondary Education and on those words alone I would have (and did) assumed that Psychology does not come into that category. :thinking:


No I have no training in psychoanalysis unfortunately! Glad you are not one of those people who love to put down subjects when they don't know anything about it (which unfortunately you tend to get a lot with psychology).

I would imagine that they are making psychology a subject at GCSE as it is becoming much more popular now. As the demand for psychologists is greater now too I think that it does stand alongside subjects such as drama, religious studies etc. There are so many different aspects to psychology that it certainly can be studied at a much broader level covering the basics. The A level and actually the degree is like this too (obviously at a more difficult level) - they try to cover breadth of the subject. Post grad studies tend to be more specialised eg educational psychology, counselling psychology, clinical psychology etc. I can also understand why you would think it is specialised. It's not until you start to study it that you realise how many different areas it covers.

:-D
#17
foxylady*
No I have no training in psychoanalysis unfortunately! Glad you are not one of those people who love to put down subjects when they don't know anything about it (which unfortunately you tend to get a lot with psychology).

I would imagine that they are making psychology a subject at GCSE as it is becoming much more popular now. As the demand for psychologists is greater now too I think that it does stand alongside subjects such as drama, religious studies etc. There are so many different aspects to psychology that it certainly can be studied at a much broader level covering the basics. The A level and actually the degree is like this too (obviously at a more difficult level) - they try to cover breadth of the subject. Post grad studies tend to be more specialised eg educational psychology, counselling psychology, clinical psychology etc. I can also understand why you would think it is specialised. It's not until you start to study it that you realise how many different areas it covers.

:-D


I dont know if schools do it, i'm doing it at college..
#18
t0mm
I dont know if schools do it, i'm doing it at college..


I believe some schools do indeed provide psychology at GSCE. How come you decided to do psychology at GCSE?
#19
t0mm
I dont know if schools do it, i'm doing it at college..


In Scotland(where I was educated), you are at school until the age of 18. After that you go to university. It used to be that going to college was also an option - AFTER you finished school at 18. I say it used to be an option because nowadays all colleges, polytechnics, and the like, are now "universities".
Personally, I still consider college (here in England) to be "at school" as you are not in an institution of further education, you are still doing A-levels, which is what you do at school.
:-D
Sorry, should have added - as it is a GCSE you are doing, that is a qualification of secondary education, rather than further education, therefore 'school'. (all my opinion, of course)
#20
Doing past-papers is near-enough a sure-fire way to pass exams now.
But then its true, its damn easy to pass now.
Got plenty qualifications at school, but everyone gets them so they end up near worthless.

I'm 23, was 17 when i left school, and coming up to exams you would study them, and half the time you got similar questions to what you studied.
To be honest i always felt it was a total joke.
You could study the papers all year, know little of the broad subject, and likely get a pass in the subject quite easily.

We had Higher level Psychology when i was at school, same as A-Level, and although Psychology as a subject is popular now, not many people took it.
Considering our system, where we get a wider range of subjects, its surprising you get it in England.

Taking specialist subjects like this while doing GCSE or even A-Level boxes you in far too much.
You choose your GCSE subjects at what 13? How are you supposed to know for certain you want to do this at Uni, which is a full 4yrs of schooling away.
Doing English, History or Modern Studies, Religious Studies, will still get you into a Psychology Degree, but it also allows scope for changing your mind.
#21
I'm not putting the subject down, but studying past papers should not be the way you pass a subject. In the qualifications I've done you get taught the whole subject and then are given the exam, at least that way you actually know the subject, not just taught to the questions in the exam.

This is probably why GSCE's mean nothing, and are undermining everything above GCSE.
#22
Ritchie 2
I'm not putting the subject down, but studying past papers should not be the way you pass a subject. In the qualifications I've done you get taught the whole subject and then are given the exam, at least that way you actually know the subject, not just taught to the questions in the exam.

This is probably why GSCE's mean nothing, and are undermining everything above GCSE.


I think being given past papers helps to practise how you will structure your argument and provide evidence for your answer. Even at degree level they encourage you to plan your answers in advance in the way of mind mapping so that you have an advantage in the exam. It is not to help those people who haven't studied. Trust me - those people don't even bother looking at past papers half the time, and when they do, rarely have the motivation or knowledge to complete them.
#23
Ritchie 2
I'm not putting the subject down, but studying past papers should not be the way you pass a subject. In the qualifications I've done you get taught the whole subject and then are given the exam, at least that way you actually know the subject, not just taught to the questions in the exam.

This is probably why GSCE's mean nothing, and are undermining everything above GCSE.


Just to let you know, schools give out past papers to help you pass the subject.
I did every one last year in french from 1999 to 2006
#24
Ritchie 2
I'm not putting the subject down, but studying past papers should not be the way you pass a subject. In the qualifications I've done you get taught the whole subject and then are given the exam, at least that way you actually know the subject, not just taught to the questions in the exam.

This is probably why GSCE's mean nothing, and are undermining everything above GCSE.


Unfortunately, with the way some of these exams seem to be marked these days, one of the major battles seems to be learning how to pass the exam. Seems that even if you know the stuff, if you don't answer it in the right format then you're unlikely to get the marks.
#25
shibi din
I have heard, that it is almost impossible to fail an exam these days. Is that correct? In my day, you got an A if you were very good, a B if you were good, a C if you were okay and anything less than that (below 50%) was a fail. Quite a good way of doing things, I thought!!


As I think I prob said t'other night, we aren't allowed to mark anything as being wrong nowadays. To be perfectly honest, it's brilliant- if a kid's really behind, I don't even have to mark their book as it's all wrong anyway! We no longer have angry parents at parent's evening, as everyone is told their child is doing OK. It all makes sense really- just browse a few threads here and you'll see that people always think they're right, even when they are entirely deluded ;-)
#26
shibi din
Is it that obvious?!? :oops:
No, really, PSYCHOLOGY as a GCSE!!! What is this country coming to???? :?
I have heard, that it is almost impossible to fail an exam these days. Is that correct? In my day, you got an A if you were very good, a B if you were good, a C if you were okay and anything less than that (below 50%) was a fail. Quite a good way of doing things, I thought!!

Point is that no matter what the subject, the level is what ever the level is - in this case GCSE.
It is far from impossible to get grades lower than C - league tables are published.
Failing is not great for those who fail.
The reasons for all the changes that have happened over the decades that I have been teaching are many and often stupid but we have to live with them.Exam technique and practising and becoming familiar with the specific exams is all part of getting the best grade that you can. There is a lot of pressure to achieve the targets set on pupils from parents and teachers and a lot of pressure on teachers to achieve their targets as well.

Good on tOmm for studying well and good link to help him. Good luck with the revision tOmm.
#27
Morning all. My comments about failing exams were not intended towards t0mm. (Maybe I shouldn't have gone off topic like that). I am sure he is more than capable of passing his exams - he comes across as a very bright young lad who will go far.
Using past papers to study for exams is a practise that has been carried out for a long, long time - even in my day. It's not to give you the answers. As chesso said earlier, it is good practice in exam technique.
As for Phsychology as a subject in secondary education I agree with haggishunter's last sentence :
Doing English, History or Modern Studies, Religious Studies, will still get you into a Psychology Degree, but it also allows scope for changing your mind.

Good luck with your revision T0mm :-D
#28
billyX
As I think I prob said t'other night, we aren't allowed to mark anything as being wrong nowadays. To be perfectly honest, it's brilliant- if a kid's really behind, I don't even have to mark their book as it's all wrong anyway! We no longer have angry parents at parent's evening, as everyone is told their child is doing OK. It all makes sense really- just browse a few threads here and you'll see that people always think they're right, even when they are entirely deluded ;-)

This made me laugh, it is so true, sad but true (imo).

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