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Government plans to pay fat people to lose weight

davelfc Avatar
9y, 1d agoPosted 9 years, 1 day ago
Is this where Keegan's transfer kitty is coming from?


Obese people could be offered vouchers or cash to lose weight under plans being examined by the Government. It is one of a raft of measures being put forward to tackle Britain's growing weight problem.

Today's Healthy Weight, Healthy Lives strategy set out the role of the workplace in encouraging people to stay healthy. And it said the Government wanted to "build up" its knowledge of the interventions that work in getting people to change their behaviour. The report said: "We will provide resources to pilot and evaluate a range of different approaches to encouraging healthy living.

"For example we will look at using financial incentives, such as payments, vouchers and other rewards, to encourage individuals to lose weight and sustain that weight loss, to eat more healthily, or to be consistently more physically active." The report pointed to evidence from the US which showed that small financial payments, as part of a broader programme, had "proven particularly effective in incentivising individuals to both achieve and maintain weight loss".

The Government also announced plans to encourage major food firms to adopt a single system of nutritional labelling. Health Secretary Alan Johnson will unveil a strategy aimed at ensuring shoppers get clear advice about the amount of fat, salt and sugar in their food. A single system of nutritional labelling will give shoppers clear advice about the amount of fat, salt and sugar in their food
At present, three different systems are being used for products on the UK's supermarket shelves. Around 20,000 food and drink items carry one system showing guideline daily amounts of key nutrients.

More than 50 firms, including Cadbury, Coca-Cola, Kellogg's, PepsiCo, Morrisons and Tesco, have introduced these labels on everything from ready meals to chocolate bars.
They have all rejected the traffic light colour-coding system recommended by the official food watchdog. The Food Standards Agency (FSA) wants red, amber and green colours on all products to indicate the levels of fat, salt and sugar contained in processed foods.

As of earlier this month, eight retailers, 16 manufacturers and four service providers were using these traffic light labels on products. The third and final system uses a mixture of guideline daily amounts and traffic light colours. Today, Mr Johnson will announce the need for a "single, simple and effective approach to food labelling used by the whole food industry".



The government may offer cash incentives to encourage obese people to lose weight
He will say many manufacturers and retailers have made "important strides" towards improving labelling, but will argue that busy parents and consumers find the multiple systems confusing. The Government has asked the FSA to set up an independent panel of experts who will complete an evaluation of the three main labelling systems currently in use. Representatives from industry and consumer organisations are sitting on the panel, which will recommend a single system later this year.

The Government believes it will be very difficult for any retailer or manufacturer to go against the recommendations of the independent panel seeing as the industry is backing the review. Mr Johnson will say: "We know that clear, simple front of pack labelling helps consumers make healthier choices and make a positive contribution to a healthy diet which is essential if we are to turn the tide on rising levels of obesity. "That is why I am determined that we must see the adoption of a single labelling system based on the best available evidence.

"This year, the Food Standards Agency, with the cooperation of the major retailers and producers, has commissioned an independent evaluation of existing food labelling schemes. "It will look carefully at the evidence, at customer preferences and effectiveness in changing behaviour, and it will make recommendations about the best system to support us in making healthy choices.

"Once that evaluation is complete, I want to see our major producers and retailers agree with the Food Standards Agency on a single labelling system, easy to understand and best able to support all of us in making informed, healthy choices about the food we eat.

"This is a real change which will put the consumer first in our efforts to improve health and tackle obesity." The cross-government obesity strategy being published today also includes plans to increase access to cycling and create new "healthy towns". Yesterday, Schools Secretary Ed Balls announced that teenagers will be given compulsory cooking lessons at school for the first time. He wants all pupils to know how to make a healthy meal. Two-thirds of adults and a third of children in the UK are currently either overweight or obese.

Without action, the Government predicts this could rise to almost nine in 10 adults and two thirds of children by 2050. Obesity increases the risk of diabetes, cancer, heart and liver disease. Mr Johnson told the BBC Radio 4 Today programme that obesity was "probably the biggest public health threat that we face". He said he wanted to proceed in consultation with the industry, but warned that compulsion could be used if companies do not move voluntarily to a better labelling system. "There could be regulation down the track," said Mr Johnson. "There is regulation already in advertising food that is high in salt, fat and sugar to children."

Mr Johnson added: "In this country we are probably ahead of the world in food labelling. Our retailers and our food manufacturers have looked at this in a very clear way and said 'Our consumers do want information'. "The problem is there are three systems. We are saying we want to work with the industry and have an independent review by experts to see which of these three systems is the most effective. Then we hope that we can convince the industry to go for one system."

Shadow health secretary Andrew Lansley told Today: "The Government, unfortunately, went for a very simplistic traffic light system in 2004 that was never going to command support with the industry or with retailers. "Back then, I argued for something that combined guidance about things like fats, sugars and salts with guideline daily amounts. "If we are going to achieve a consensus in this country which we can then try to drive through on a Europe-wide basis, the thing we are going to need is combined traffic light and guideline daily amounts to help people construct their diets.

"If there is a consensus across the political parties, I think we are much more likely to be able to win through both with manufacturers and retailers and in Europe for a clear, consistent labelling system."

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/news.html?in_article_id=509867&in_page_id=1770
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davelfc Avatar
9y, 1d agoPosted 9 years, 1 day ago
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#1
I'm sorry but **** that I am reading it all... headline got me interested... but that's a ****ing book.
Answer... put on weight to reap the rewards... :P
#2
macdonalds here i come...LOL
#3
I don't think giving money to people that are overweight will help them. I think the only people we can help now are young children who can be educated. There's far too many fast food outlets, far too much disposeable income and people want everything NOW, including their food.

Society has to change, everything is geared up towards us eating the wrong type of food, there's little chance of people getting decent exercise.

I fear the only real solution for most adults would be if some miracle pill came along that forced the body to start burning stored fat or stopped the body storing fat.

It's crazy that we have such an amazing body that is capable of so much but is still operating as if we were cavemen. Who knows, in the future we might evolve and manage a way of dealing with extra sugar and fat in our diet but until then a lot of fast food outlets and diet companies are going to continue to get very rich.
#4
how over weight do you have to be so that you are entitled to
#5
I wonder how many posts will be in this thread before it gets locked?
#6
I think you put it far more eloquently than my rant :)

I just think the government have things so badly mixed up. Sending hooligans on holiday, giving money to the overweight, people protecting themselves against attack get taken to court. The world really is a twisted place.
#7
[SIZE="6"]Fat[/SIZE] cats are being treated already.:w00t:
#8
Leila70
Makes me sick to thing fat bloaters who spend all their money on food get even more money thrown at them!! I sit across from a woman in my office who does half the work of the rest in the office as she says she can't move, she buys about £10 worth of rubbish every day and sits and eats at her desk and moans about how little money she has when she actually earns more than the rest in the office and her hubby is loaded. She eats about 4 takeouts a week and grrrrr! Sorry I'm not anti -fat people but I just hate listening to her moan all day about her weight and money and then hear that she can get handouts for being so indulgent and lazy. Really sorry of this offends anyone


Your comments are very offensive
I was extremely thin and a 'friend' wished I wasn't - she got her wish. I was put on steroids - in 4 months I doubled my weight - going from a size 6 to a size 22

It has taken years to drop to a 16/18

Would you like to be in the fat ladies shoes?

No - I thought not
#9
I also think even considering offering overweight people money is offensive, it's a little bit like saying 'well they're greedy so let's give them money'

Far better would be setting up health clinics and places where people that are overweight could get support, education and exercise.

Sorting out the food on sale in this country might help, making labels on food accurate as well. Low in fat (but high in sugar) for instance. Puting tax on unhealthy foods and cutting tax on healthy foods might help.
banned#10
show me the money....i'll go spend it wisely at mc'dee's
#11
Problem is people see overweight people in a certain way ie they are fat as they eat too much.

Not the case always as I dont eat huge amounts and 2 years ago I starved for 2 days then ate salad for 3 days and put on over a stone.

Its metabolism as I know dozens if not more people who eat take aways a lot, some daily but are thin.

But I think thats due to alcohol in part as on a night out they are sick then eat a kebab so lose weight when sick
#12
UltimoScorpion
show me the money....i'll go spend it wisely at mc'dee's


Isnt it past your bedtime???
#13
davelfc
I also think even considering offering overweight people money is offensive, it's a little bit like saying 'well they're greedy so let's give them money'

Far better would be setting up health clinics and places where people that are overweight could get support, education and exercise.

Sorting out the food on sale in this country might help, making labels on food accurate as well. Low in fat (but high in sugar) for instance. Puting tax on unhealthy foods and cutting tax on healthy foods might help.


I think thats a horrible statement as you are comparing greed with overweight people.
#14
If you'd read my text properly I wasn't talking about people with weight problems who have weight problems because of health problems because for your information I do have weight issues caused by pcos and diabetes and I work constantly to keep the weight off but it's those who are obese and put a strain on the health service because they are just lazy and greedy. You should read a bit more carefully. And as someone else has already said it is offensive that those types of people get handouts
banned#15
Silentgirl!
Isnt it past your bedtime???


ooo you are up, go into MSN I need to ask you summat
#16
Well I personally am overweight but have never been to hospital for any treatment in my life(apart from when I had my arm broken when I was attacked)

so I think its stereotypes that fat people are causing a strain.

Its only the hugely obese that would cause problems
#17
I actually agree with you but what I was trying to get at is the government are really doing the wrong thing. Education, even perhaps their ideas of bringing cookery classes back are better. They need to tackle the cause not the result.
#18
I have a degree in biology and am overweight. I have been slimmer - I achieved this by starvation and hours of exercise. I have an extremely thin partner who eats a lot more than me and doesn't exercise. We are the same height. I brought up three, very active, overweight children (now adults) who did not see biscuits/sweets/takeaways when small as I was determined that they would grow up to be slim. They didn't.
All of us are extremely healthy and rarely have medical treatment. I have no medical problems at all and never have had anything serious. My mother who is now 79, is also overweight, is rarely ill and only recently succumbed to a few problems due to arthritis. We are all vegetarians and eat loads of fruit and veg.
I resent three things:
1. The assumption that all overweight people trough like pigs.
2.. That overweight = unhealthy
3. A government that thinks that all fat people are poorly motivated slobs.
Here ends my rant!!
#19
What a stupid, useless waste of money by the government, yet again. Well, in my opinion anyway.

I think people would be a lot less overweight if all companies were forced to put calorific amounts on every single product that was on the shelves. It's pretty well publicised how many calories men and women should be eating so surely the money would be better spent letting people see exactly what they are eating.

Obviously, there are always going to be that group of people that don't care and want to eat what they want regardless of their size, and nothing's going to change them or their opinion - even a £50 Tesco voucher or whatever the government are thinking of offering, but for those that think they are doing the right thing by buying the healthy selection of ready meals, showing the calories that are actually in them might help them realise they're not being as healthy as they think and might stop the supermarkets loading things with sugar and marking them as healthy
#20
If I got the vouchers I would buy nice things like chicken breasts, salads etc, just right now I live of noodles and junk like that as I cant afford to spend loads(well I could but it would mean no luxuries)

Sometimes I bid on cheap M and S vouchers on Ebay and buy good food.
#21
The government are doing this all wrong.

The reason why a lot of people put on weight is as the Government have already realised, is lack of motivation and it's expensive to sort out your weight.

An example of this is gym memberships cost around £50-£100 per month and you must sign a year long contract, which many people are scared of committing, especially if they can't remain motivated, so instead, they should help introduce a pay as you go gym membership or a rolling contract and they should help pay for a portion of gym costs for everyone for the more you attend.
For example, we've joined under the pruhealth scheme, which we pay the initial join up fee and health insurance and providing we attend twice a week or more on a quarterly basis, we won't require to pay anything further for the gym, whereas if we attend 1-2 times per week on average, we pay £25 per month and if you attend less than once a week, then it's £38 per month.

Due to this scheme, we've been attending 2-3 times per week for the last few months and now we're so motivated, we're considering going every day, even though there's no further incentives other than vitality points.
#22
Another issue is that if someone is on a tight budget, they won't be able to afford the healthier foods, whereas the cheapest foods all have additional preservatives and fat, so the Government should pay a portion of the fresh and healthier foods and increase tax on unhealthy junk by putting tax on.
This would entice people to choose the cheaper option, which is healthier and they can then treat themselves once in a while by buying expensive pizza for example.

After watching Jamie Olivers programme about healthier eating, we discovered that the budget sausages come from the worst parts of the pig containing 32% meat and comes packed in fat with emulsifiers, preservatives, flavourings and more to cover up the nasty taste and smell, whereas good quality sausages have a content of around 80% and is prime cuts of meat but comes at a cost of double the price.

All that's happening is people on low income have to buy the worst foods in order to survive and another issue is, the foods full of rubbish sends the wrong message to your brain, which tell you that you're not full up and actually tells you to snack more because you're not satisfied with what you've eaten.

We now snack on loads of fruit and veg now but this has increased our shopping budget considerably but I believe if there were incentives to help educate and test these diets, it would have a long term benefit for the whole country.
#23
I just remembered that during the Jamie Oliver programme, a Scientist conducted a study by dysecting a healthy person and an obese person and the results were astonishing..... yet disgusting.

The healthy man had muscle throughout his body and had no problems in area whilst living a normal life.

Unfortunately, the obese man had so much fatty tissue throughout his body, the scientist stated he knew approximately where his heart would be but couldn't see any part of it.
His stomache was actually full of so much fat, that his intestines no longer had space to remain in it's natural position, so it ended up being forced further up the body where other vital organs required to rest, whilst the heart and lungs were forced to be squashed in between the top of his chest to his neck and because of the additional hard work required from his heart to pump blood, it actually expanded in size and eventually he died from heart failure because it could no longer cope with the additional strain.
The lungs were also in a disatrous state, being only around a third of the size of a normal human beings because your lungs are effectively bags, it was squashed into a compact area and was so tiny, the obese man would literally be out of breathe after taking a few steps at normal pace.

He also had loads of joints problems in his ankles, elbows and especially his knees due to the additional weight in all areas of the body and this ultimately adds to the cycle of an obese man becoming bigger because he can't exercise due to the amount of long term damage he's created that could never be reversed.

If anyone can find a video clip, I do urge you to view this because this test can save peoples lives, it's disgusting but is definitely an eye opener.
#24
Leila70
Makes me sick to thing fat bloaters who spend all their money on food get even more money thrown at them!!
.....
Sorry I'm not anti -fat people


Not much :lol:

Susannah

2.. That overweight = unhealthy


It is 'inherently' unhealthy. Anybody who thinks otherwise is deluded.

ryouga
If I got the vouchers I would buy nice things like chicken breasts, salads etc, just right now I live of noodles and junk like that as I cant afford to spend loads


And herein lies the real problem. As RFM says, budget plays a BIG part on peoples weight. It's all very well for people like that nobber Jamie Oliver or those 2 skinny bints on C4 banging on about eating healthy, but not everybody can afford to. Well really you can't afford not to, but you get my point. I don't think throwing money at a problem is ever a solution though. I watched a program about this woman in the US who had to be craned out of her house and she claimed that being fat was an illness and she hardly ate anything. Well how the hell can you put on weight without eating anything? Instantaneous transmutation of energy in the air into body matter maybe? Wtf??!!?

By the way, to use a good quote, "I'm not anti -fat people", I AM ONE:thumbsup:

But anyway, lets try an experiment. Go HERE and see what it tells you. Heres mine...

Your BMI is 35.59

If your BMI is between 30 and 39.9 you're obese. This means you're well over the ideal weight for your height. This could cause serious health problems and affect your life expectancy. Are you eating more than the recommended amount of calories per day? Are you getting enough exercise? Once you gain the confidence to start exercising regularly you'll notice a huge difference. See your GP for advice if you've tried to lose weight without success.


Once you gain confidence... Oh there's another one, do thin people consider how a fat person actually feels walking into a gym etc and getting stared at as if they were some sort of 6 headed alien? To be looked down upon by your peers while you are trying to improve your lot?:thinking:
#25
That's true Shengis, it's so easy to let go of yourself but it's quite hard to realise that you're in a slide until it's too late, as people can easily become dillusional about there fat ratio.
When I started putting on weight, I started assuming that all my clothes must of shrunk in the wash and then thought the same in the next wash because it just kept feeling tighter and tighter but I feel it's important to regularily weigh yourself to keep yourself intact.

The Jamie Oliver programme also showed that people that were deemed as skinny or to have a normal body were actually very unhealthy as well, again being based upon there diet and lack of exercise.
It seemed that people of normal weight were almost as unhealthy as people that were grossly overweight but someone actually stunned me at the gym, as I saw a guy that must of weighed at least 20 stones on the treadmill and he ran for about half hour without stopping and then came back after he changed his drenched top, now that's what you call desire. :giggle:

I honestly couldn't believe it, I can't even do half that time but I'm putting that down to smoking, which I've cut down since I've been working out, as I've only smoked less than a packet since in nearly 3 months and this is coming from someone that's been smoking for over 10 years when I started at the age of 14.
I haven't used anything to help me other than motivation and willpower and I've done it all on my own accord because I'm doing this for myself and my family around me and everyone else can too if they really wanted, as it's the mind that controls what you do at every step, even addictions, you just need to want it enough and you'll reap the benefits.

Just to clarify, when I originally joined the gym, I was very surprised to hear that I actually wasn't that far off from being considered as obese but the PT said the machine doesn't base it on how much muscle you have and muscle does weigh more than fat but I honestly couldn't believe how some people at the gym were considered obese but looked very slightly overweight and I always assumed that obese people were considered to be people that require mechanical assistance to get out of there arm chair.
#26
At the end of the day, the only person who can improve your life is you. You HAVE to make a concious decision on where you want to be in the future, focus on that goal and go for it. Don't do diets, they don't work. You will lose weight, you will end the diet, eat the same old carp and put it back on. So what is the solution? Simply, a complete change of lifestyle and outlook. Examine what you do, what you eat. Is it good stuff or is it shit? Anything over 5% fat is bad, stick below that figure and you will see the benefit. What people need to do is look at what they eat, look at what they enjoy and draw up a lifeplan. Consider your food, consider healthy food and ask yourself, could I eat this for the rest of my life? Can I live without chocolate? Can I live without chips and kebabs every friday?* If the answer is no, give up you're doomed. Blunt, but thats how it is. Once you start there is no going back because if you do you're just perpetrating the 'diet cycle', which is just a waste of time.

A bit Tony Robbinsy, but true.

*Not to say you can't eat chocolate and kebabs, you can. The key word is moderation ;-)

(No I don't practice what I preach, but I have done and it DOES work)
#27
I think the big problems with weight issues is people try to oversimplify them. They just assume that all fat people are overweight for exactly the same reasons and that exactly the same thing will cure them all. This is simply not true. There are countless issues behind why people are overweight, some of them physical, some of them psycological, some of them medical, some of them social, some of them historical, some of them financial, etc.

Unless you put into place a system that can look at each case individually and prescribe a suitable course of action for each person, you are never going to cure the problem. Sure, you might be able to help some, but you aren't going to be able to help those in most need, any more than you help anorexics by telling them to simply eat more.

Personally, I think giving overweight people money is a good idea, although I think it should to done using a voucher scheme. i.e. Vouchers for fresh vegetables/healthy food, vouches for weight watchers type meetings, vouchers for access to gyms/swimming pools (with sessions tailored for overweight people), etc.
#28
NS, don't you think a voucher system would have the same effect as free school dinners? People using them would be looked down upon? I just tend to think the worst of everybody (until proven otherwise) which is why I pose the question.
#29
Shengis
NS, don't you think a voucher system would have the same effect as free school dinners? People using them would be looked down upon? I just tend to think the worst of everybody (until proven otherwise) which is why I pose the question.


hmmm...no, I don't think so. The school dinners thing only comes about because it is really obvious who is getting them and of course, because when you are a child being different to your peers is a far greater 'crime'.

If you were in Tescos buying your shopping and hand over some vouchers along with your payment, it wouldn't stand out any more than someone handing over their 5p off Andrex, or Tesco type vouchers, etc. and those people aren't looked down upon. And lets face it, if someone is the type of person who looks down on someone for that kind of thing, they are far more likely to be looking down at you simply because you are overweight because that's what's most noticeable; they wouldn't even see the voucher unless they happen to be stood right next to you at the till.
#30
nightswimmer
And lets face it, if someone is the type of person who looks down on someone for that kind of thing, they are far more likely to be looking down at you simply because you are overweight because that's what's most noticeable; they wouldn't even see the voucher unless they happen to be stood right next to you at the till.


Or they could be looking at you thinking, "Oh, thats why they're so fat, the ******* pays for their food with money off vouchers. Bet if they didn't have them they wouldn't be able to afford so much so would be thinner". Deliberately being semi offensive to show how some people think or how the fat person may be thinking they're thinking. If you see what I mean. They're already going to be self concious of their size, and now they're going to be self conscious about buying their food with vouchers on top. There is no easy solution.

Incidentally, the US has/had a food voucher scheme. A fair proportion of the people who get them tend to sell them for good old fashioned $. At a pretty poor conversion rate obviously.
#31
Shengis
Or they could be looking at you thinking, "Oh, thats why they're so fat, the ******* pays for their food with money off vouchers. Bet if they didn't have them they wouldn't be able to afford so much so would be thinner". Deliberately being semi offensive to show how some people think or how the fat person may be thinking they're thinking. If you see what I mean. They're already going to be self concious of their size, and now they're going to be self conscious about buying their food with vouchers on top. There is no easy solution.


I see what you are saying, but people are aleady thinking those kinds of things about fat people. They are already judging (or perceived to be judging) what people have in their basket, so I am not sure that it's going to add any fears that aren't already there.

Incidentally, the US has/had a food voucher scheme. A fair proportion of the people who get them tend to sell them for good old fashioned $. At a pretty poor conversion rate obviously.


Yeh, I know, or using them to buy fags and booze. But then a good number of people use them to buy food they would otherwise not be able to afford. That's why I think they should be targetted vouchers (i.e. money off fresh vegetables) rather than general food vouchers like they have in the US. Whilst obviously they can still be traded, they aren't such an attractive deal. Also, you could add people's Names or NI number to the vouchers, so that if they do start to be traded on eBay and the likes, they can easily be traced. Again, that's not going to stop all the abuse, but if a good proportion of people are helped, then perhaps the odd person abusing the system is a price worth paying.
#32
If they do this then they should be gym vouchers or money off certain foods like fruit and veg or even a fruit and veg hamper per week. :)
#33
Ok. Next question, just for a bit more controversy...

Who's going to pay for all this ;-) (Let's see how much fur we can get flying :lol:)

To be honest, I blame a lot of this on the supermarkets. A big problem for a lot of people, as we know, is price. So the supermarkets brought out their 'value' ranges. Now, where that falls down is everything is made to a price so for the most part its the leftover carp. Tinned veg etc, not really a problem as its not exactly unhealthy or fattening, but anything with 'meat' in it.... How they can sell you a sausage that's full of mank and legally get away with it defies belief. And don't get me started on 'chicken' nuggets...

And remember, these are the sort of things skint mums are feeding their kids. Doesn't take Einstein to see a pattern here.
#34
Shengis
Ok. Next question, just for a bit more controversy...

Who's going to pay for all this ;-) (Let's see how much fur we can get flying :lol:)


Tax food/drinks that have a high fat or sugar content and also any advertising of high fat/sugar food. The rest can come out of the NHS budget given that overweight people are supposed to be costing the NHS so much, and this would hopefully save a lot of that cost.
#35
nightswimmer
Tax food/drinks that have a high fat or sugar content and also any advertising of high fat/sugar food. The rest can come out of the NHS budget given that overweight people are supposed to be costing the NHS so much, and this would hopefully save a lot of that cost.


Like that answer:thumbsup: Most high fat/sugar foods are already taxed though as VAT, healthy food doesn't have VAT. The only notable ones that slip the net are these manky value 'meat' products, oh and cheese (no retreat, no surrender. You'll take my cheese from my cold dead hand etc lol). No comment on the NHS funding of this, as I said earlier i'm a fat ******* and the only NHS treatment i've had in the last 10 years are a few tablets for my back (no doubt partly attributable to my weight, mostly due to heavy lifting though) and some dental treatment. So if they want to give me free gym membership i'm game, i'll be costing them a damn sight more than I have been. Time to get some of that NI money back:-D
#36
Shengis
Most high fat/sugar foods are already taxed though as VAT, healthy food doesn't have VAT.


I didn't think the so called 'fat tax' had gone through. I know it's been touted a couple times but I didn't think it had got as far as law. i.e. this news article is from July last year.

No comment on the NHS funding of this, as I said earlier i'm a fat ******* and the only NHS treatment i've had in the last 10 years are a few tablets for my back (no doubt partly attributable to my weight, mostly due to heavy lifting though) and some dental treatment.


Yeah, but the theory goes, even if you haven't had any problems now your lifespan will probably be shortened (i.e. less tax paying years), you're more likely to get health problems when you get older, and even when you do get 'normallly occuring' health problems, they will cost more to treat due to the complcations of being overweight. So by paying more now, they are investing in the hope that you will pay them more later and cost them less.
#37
It would be more effective to have guards stationed at Muccy Ds armed with tasers, and people over a certain BMI get zapped.
#38
Your BMI is 28.13If your BMI is between 25 and 29.9 you're over the ideal weight for your height. Make sure you have a healthy, well-balanced diet and don't eat more calories than you need to. If you're trying to lose weight, get more exercise and avoid snacking and 'crash' diets. If you carry your weight around your stomach, you're 'apple-shaped', rather than 'pear-shaped'. This means you're at more risk of health problems, so you really need to get your weight down.


my bmi

so according to this im over weight, y? Because of that lovely service called the nhs missing a serious knee problem i had for 4 years before they agreed something was wrong and by that stage my training (which used to be 7times a week) was down to only being one nite.

At those times it was hard to see what was going to happen so yes i did indugle too much, but now having had some limited help with my knees im back playing football alot (will soon be back to 3 times a week) plus back in the gym.

So sometimes its not through choice that a person puts on weight sometimes circumstances play a part.

If the gov spent more on nhs i would not have had to wait so long for my knee problem to be notice, which can i say the doctor at the specialist clinic after i finally got a referral noticed within 5mins. I also wouldnt have been left with pins and needles down one arm because when i damaged my shoulder it woulda been fixed properly not the hack job i got.

So fat doesnt equal choice some of the time
#39
DKLS
It would be more effective to have guards stationed at Muccy Ds armed with tasers, and people over a certain BMI get zapped.


I can see from the content of your post that you're probably not a stranger to electric shock therapy yourself. ;-):p:whistling:
#40
nightswimmer
I didn't think the so called 'fat tax' had gone through. I know it's been touted a couple times but I didn't think it had got as far as law. i.e. this news article is from July last year.


Interesting. I do hate it when these study groups think they can predict things though. I agree with Blair though (one time won't hurt :lol:), we don't need a nanny state. Subsidise the farmers, get the land back to work instead of just leaving it to grow weeds.

About the VAT, basically anything non essential has VAT. That includes....

All sweets (not sure about chewing gum, but probably)
Most biscuits, I think crackers etc are exempt though.
Most crisps type snacks apart from those with no MSG.
Peanuts.
Soft Drinks.
Bog roll and sanitary towels (as I said, NON essentials), not sure on the current situation with ST's.
Pet food.

Not an exhaustive list by any means, but a start. Then you get this fat tax brought it, all food will be taxed apart from peas etc lol.

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