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Great idea to reduce the welfare bill

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Bricklayers earning £1000 a week due to skills gap...surely there's an opportunity to train up some of the unemployed to fill this gap Read More
davewave Avatar
2y, 7m agoPosted 2 years, 7 months ago
Bricklayers earning £1000 a week due to skills gap...surely there's an opportunity to train up some of the unemployed to fill this gap
davewave Avatar
2y, 7m agoPosted 2 years, 7 months ago
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1 Like #1
2 Likes #2
thats not a new brainwave....

Ive long said we need to stop foreign invest and withdraw from open immigration policies redirecting funding into training our home grown individuals into the positions that need filling.
#3
Lucifer_UK
thats not a new brainwave....

I've long said we need to stop foreign invest and withdraw from open immigration policies redirecting funding into training our home grown individuals into the positions that need filling.

Maybe not new, but seems there's a greater incentive given the high salary offered.
#4
Nothing to stop anyone training as a bricklayer.
#5
exmouthred
Nothing to stop anyone training as a bricklayer.

Could be wrong but cost?
1 Like #6
Bricklayers are normally paid so much per thousand bricks laid so I doubt they will be earning £1000 per week during the upcoming cold weather as you have to stop laying bricks around 3:00pm or else the water in the mortar will freeze.
2 Likes #7
would they be working on the site from morning 'til night? :D
http://i2.chroniclelive.co.uk/incoming/article6027928.ece/alternates/s615/TRMRMMGLPICT000024785117o.jpg
1 Like #8
DarkEnergy2012
would they be working on the site from morning 'til night? :D
http://i2.chroniclelive.co.uk/incoming/article6027928.ece/alternates/s615/TRMRMMGLPICT000024785117o.jpg

Love it, that was such a good show.
1 Like #9
DarkEnergy2012
would they be working on the site from morning 'til night? :Dhttp://i2.chroniclelive.co.uk/incoming/article6027928.ece/alternates/s615/TRMRMMGLPICT000024785117o.jpg

That's living alright!
3 Likes #10
Problem with headlines like this is a lot of people read it and then decide to learn to be a bricklayer but by the time they are good enough there are too many brickies and not enough work so the wages are then driven down.

The old experienced brickies leave the industry and we are left with a load of money obsessed youngsters who may well be okay at straight walls but ask them to work on a Listed Building where nothing is straight or level or construct an arch or herringbone panel and they do not have a clue but still want sky high wages.
#11
Trouble is training starts at 9am . Most of the Layabouts don't get up till midday and by then the pubs are open :(
#12
donaldduck2
Problem with headlines like this is a lot of people read it and then decide to learn to be a bricklayer but by the time they are good enough there are too many brickies and not enough work so the wages are then driven down.

The old experienced brickies leave the industry and we are left with a load of money obsessed youngsters who may well be okay at straight walls but ask them to work on a Listed Building where nothing is straight or level or construct an arch or herringbone panel and they do not have a clue but still want sky high wages.

You see this every few years, I remember hearing about the Woman who stopped her training as a lawyer because plumbers were earning over £100k a year.
banned 1 Like #13
Lucifer_UK
thats not a new brainwave...

...It's a new davewave :{
#14
rogparki
Trouble is training starts at 9am . Most of the Layabouts don't get up till midday and by then the pubs are open :(

Some on benefits are surely interested in working but stuck in a rut.
4 Likes #15
LOL @ people assuming that anyone can be a bricklayer with minimal training.
1 Like #16
teh arn
donaldduck2
Problem with headlines like this is a lot of people read it and then decide to learn to be a bricklayer but by the time they are good enough there are too many brickies and not enough work so the wages are then driven down.

The old experienced brickies leave the industry and we are left with a load of money obsessed youngsters who may well be okay at straight walls but ask them to work on a Listed Building where nothing is straight or level or construct an arch or herringbone panel and they do not have a clue but still want sky high wages.

You see this every few years, I remember hearing about the Woman who stopped her training as a lawyer because plumbers were earning over £100k a year.

We have a boom in London construction, we should be attracting those we are paying benefits to, rather than paying over the odds or looking outside, given there are so many people paid benefits and housed in London - surely some untapped talent.
3 Likes #17
We read these headlines but does anyone actually know of construction workers earning £1000 per week 50 weeks of the year not just every now and then?

I know a young lad who is earning he claims fantastic money bricklaying but he leaves home at 6:30am and gets home at 8:00pm now even if he was earning the magical £1000 per week he is putting in 67.5 hours for it which equates to £14.80 per hour. Less diesel and wear and tear on his vehicle plus he has no life during the week outside of work.
#18
Monkeybumcheeks
LOL @ people assuming that anyone can be a bricklayer with minimal training.

737,000 young people aged 16-24 were unemployed in July to September 2014 - surely some of them could learn a trade such as bricklaying?

Edited By: davewave on Dec 09, 2014 17:06
1 Like #19
donaldduck2
We read these headlines but does anyone actually know of construction workers earning £1000 per week 50 weeks of the year not just every now and then?

I know a young lad who is earning he claims fantastic money bricklaying but he leaves home at 6:30am and gets home at 8:00pm now even if he was earning the magical £1000 per week he is putting in 67.5 hours for it which equates to £14.80 per hour. Less diesel and wear and tear on his vehicle plus he has no life during the week outside of work.

06:30 - 20:00 - are you saying thats unusual - most people in London commute about 45mins to 1 hour each way. Standard.

Edited By: davewave on Dec 09, 2014 17:11
#20
davewave
teh arn
donaldduck2
Problem with headlines like this is a lot of people read it and then decide to learn to be a bricklayer but by the time they are good enough there are too many brickies and not enough work so the wages are then driven down.

The old experienced brickies leave the industry and we are left with a load of money obsessed youngsters who may well be okay at straight walls but ask them to work on a Listed Building where nothing is straight or level or construct an arch or herringbone panel and they do not have a clue but still want sky high wages.

You see this every few years, I remember hearing about the Woman who stopped her training as a lawyer because plumbers were earning over £100k a year.

We have a boom in London construction, we should be attracting those we are paying benefits to, rather than paying over the odds or looking outside, given there are so many people paid benefits and housed in London - surely some untapped talent.

I agree; rather than pay them their benefits maybe give them some kind of subsidised apprentice wage with a job at the end of it?

Would sort out the people that CBA to work from those that genuinely can't find it.
#21
donaldduck2
We read these headlines but does anyone actually know of construction workers earning £1000 per week 50 weeks of the year not just every now and then?

I know a young lad who is earning he claims fantastic money bricklaying but he leaves home at 6:30am and gets home at 8:00pm now even if he was earning the magical £1000 per week he is putting in 67.5 hours for it which equates to £14.80 per hour. Less diesel and wear and tear on his vehicle plus he has no life during the week outside of work.

Very hard to find tradesmen in residential who are willing to take less than 200 a day, I thought commercial paid more (talking about London here)?

Edited By: davewave on Dec 09, 2014 17:11
1 Like #22
davewave
Monkeybumcheeks
LOL @ people assuming that anyone can be a bricklayer with minimal training.

737,000 young people aged 16-24 were unemployed in July to September 2014 - surely some of them could learn a trade such as bricklaying?

Agreed, but how many would take the three year apprenticeship required to get to a decent standard on less than the minimum wage only to come out the other side just as soon as the boom has ended.....just like I did !
#23
teh arn
davewave
teh arn
donaldduck2
Problem with headlines like this is a lot of people read it and then decide to learn to be a bricklayer but by the time they are good enough there are too many brickies and not enough work so the wages are then driven down.

The old experienced brickies leave the industry and we are left with a load of money obsessed youngsters who may well be okay at straight walls but ask them to work on a Listed Building where nothing is straight or level or construct an arch or herringbone panel and they do not have a clue but still want sky high wages.

You see this every few years, I remember hearing about the Woman who stopped her training as a lawyer because plumbers were earning over £100k a year.

We have a boom in London construction, we should be attracting those we are paying benefits to, rather than paying over the odds or looking outside, given there are so many people paid benefits and housed in London - surely some untapped talent.

I agree; rather than pay them their benefits maybe give them some kind of subsidised apprentice wage with a job at the end of it?

Would sort out the people that CBA to work from those that genuinely can't find it.

I'm stuck on how to feel about subsidized apprenticeships; they're fantastic to give people who are staring down the barrel of lifetime unemployment (or at least difficulty) but it's difficult to trust some of the larger companies ripping the a**e out of it like Tesco do with the minimum wage.

Is this something along the lines of what you're thinking?
#24
jaybear88
teh arn
davewave
teh arn
donaldduck2
Problem with headlines like this is a lot of people read it and then decide to learn to be a bricklayer but by the time they are good enough there are too many brickies and not enough work so the wages are then driven down.

The old experienced brickies leave the industry and we are left with a load of money obsessed youngsters who may well be okay at straight walls but ask them to work on a Listed Building where nothing is straight or level or construct an arch or herringbone panel and they do not have a clue but still want sky high wages.

You see this every few years, I remember hearing about the Woman who stopped her training as a lawyer because plumbers were earning over £100k a year.

We have a boom in London construction, we should be attracting those we are paying benefits to, rather than paying over the odds or looking outside, given there are so many people paid benefits and housed in London - surely some untapped talent.

I agree; rather than pay them their benefits maybe give them some kind of subsidised apprentice wage with a job at the end of it?

Would sort out the people that CBA to work from those that genuinely can't find it.

I'm stuck on how to feel about subsidized apprenticeships; they're fantastic to give people who are staring down the barrel of lifetime unemployment (or at least difficulty) but it's difficult to trust some of the larger companies ripping the a**e out of it like Tesco do with the minimum wage.

Is this something along the lines of what you're thinking?

What do Tesco do with it?
#25
donaldduck2
We read these headlines but does anyone actually know of construction workers earning £1000 per week 50 weeks of the year not just every now and then?
I know a young lad who is earning he claims fantastic money bricklaying but he leaves home at 6:30am and gets home at 8:00pm now even if he was earning the magical £1000 per week he is putting in 67.5 hours for it which equates to £14.80 per hour. Less diesel and wear and tear on his vehicle plus he has no life during the week outside of work.

Surprised Harry hasnt resurrected this character from the past.

http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Money/Pix/pictures/2008/11/11/loadsamoney460x276.jpg

It's like the 80's all over again.......but not really ;)
#26
jaybear88
teh arn
davewave
teh arn
donaldduck2
Problem with headlines like this is a lot of people read it and then decide to learn to be a bricklayer but by the time they are good enough there are too many brickies and not enough work so the wages are then driven down.

The old experienced brickies leave the industry and we are left with a load of money obsessed youngsters who may well be okay at straight walls but ask them to work on a Listed Building where nothing is straight or level or construct an arch or herringbone panel and they do not have a clue but still want sky high wages.

You see this every few years, I remember hearing about the Woman who stopped her training as a lawyer because plumbers were earning over £100k a year.

We have a boom in London construction, we should be attracting those we are paying benefits to, rather than paying over the odds or looking outside, given there are so many people paid benefits and housed in London - surely some untapped talent.

I agree; rather than pay them their benefits maybe give them some kind of subsidised apprentice wage with a job at the end of it?

Would sort out the people that CBA to work from those that genuinely can't find it.

I'm stuck on how to feel about subsidized apprenticeships; they're fantastic to give people who are staring down the barrel of lifetime unemployment (or at least difficulty) but it's difficult to trust some of the larger companies ripping the a**e out of it like Tesco do with the minimum wage.

Is this something along the lines of what you're thinking?

Yeah, exactly no reason why not - better to improve peoples' opportunities where there's a growing demand. It may already be happening on a large scale.
#27
jaybear88
teh arn
davewave
teh arn
donaldduck2
Problem with headlines like this is a lot of people read it and then decide to learn to be a bricklayer but by the time they are good enough there are too many brickies and not enough work so the wages are then driven down.
The old experienced brickies leave the industry and we are left with a load of money obsessed youngsters who may well be okay at straight walls but ask them to work on a Listed Building where nothing is straight or level or construct an arch or herringbone panel and they do not have a clue but still want sky high wages.
You see this every few years, I remember hearing about the Woman who stopped her training as a lawyer because plumbers were earning over £100k a year.
We have a boom in London construction, we should be attracting those we are paying benefits to, rather than paying over the odds or looking outside, given there are so many people paid benefits and housed in London - surely some untapped talent.
I agree; rather than pay them their benefits maybe give them some kind of subsidised apprentice wage with a job at the end of it?
Would sort out the people that CBA to work from those that genuinely can't find it.
I'm stuck on how to feel about subsidized apprenticeships; they're fantastic to give people who are staring down the barrel of lifetime unemployment (or at least difficulty) but it's difficult to trust some of the larger companies ripping the a**e out of it like Tesco do with the minimum wage.Is this something along the lines of what you're thinking?

Its just the larger companies either, the restaurant trade is full of small restaurants using kids for £70 a week doing 50+ hours as cheap employement offering no prospects and little skills... it hasn't changed in 20 years.
1 Like #28
Not sure if its been said not read the thread but I doubt they are making a grand a week, the companies would go overseas for some minimum wage workers, I used to speak online to a joiner he got about £14 an hour, he was laid off by his company saying they didn't need him as they had too many joiners for the amount of work they had, they then employed two eastern European joiners on minimum wage.

And of course minimum wage = top up benefits.
#29
Error440
Not sure if its been said not read the thread but I doubt they are making a grand a week, the companies would go overseas for some minimum wage workers, I used to speak online to a joiner he got about £14 an hour, he was laid off by his company saying they didn't need him as they had too many joiners for the amount of work they had, they then employed two eastern European joiners on minimum wage.

And of course minimum wage = top up benefits.

from the EC Harris index...

Average day rates for bricklayers in the range of £170/day to £180/day can be found in many regions including East Anglia, the South-east and Scotland as well as London.

http://m.cnplus.co.uk/8670841.article


Edited By: davewave on Dec 09, 2014 20:40: correcting formatting which I couldn't on the app
#30
davewave
Error440
Not sure if its been said not read the thread but I doubt they are making a grand a week, the companies would go overseas for some minimum wage workers, I used to speak online to a joiner he got about £14 an hour, he was laid off by his company saying they didn't need him as they had too many joiners for the amount of work they had, they then employed two eastern European joiners on minimum wage.

And of course minimum wage = top up benefits.

from the EC Harris index...

Average day rates for bricklayers in the range of £170/day to £180/day can be found in many regions including East Anglia, the South-east and Scotland as well as London.

http://m.cnplus.co.uk/8670841.article


I don't think the link is working but anyway I would like to see what these bricklayers are earning over the course of a year in that they will not be laying anywhere nearly as many bricks during the Winter as they would in the Summer.
#31
donaldduck2
davewave
Error440
Not sure if its been said not read the thread but I doubt they are making a grand a week, the companies would go overseas for some minimum wage workers, I used to speak online to a joiner he got about £14 an hour, he was laid off by his company saying they didn't need him as they had too many joiners for the amount of work they had, they then employed two eastern European joiners on minimum wage.

And of course minimum wage = top up benefits.

from the EC Harris index...

Average day rates for bricklayers in the range of £170/day to £180/day can be found in many regions including East Anglia, the South-east and Scotland as well as London.

http://m.cnplus.co.uk/8670841.article


I don't think the link is working but anyway I would like to see what these bricklayers are earning over the course of a year in that they will not be laying anywhere nearly as many bricks during the Winter as they would in the Summer.

Link again, dont believe brickies starve in winter
#32
I've found my new job hunting flamedeer cause I've caught one just reading this post

Edited By: Rach75 on Dec 10, 2014 18:57
#33
exmouthred
DarkEnergy2012
would they be working on the site from morning 'til night? :Dhttp://i2.chroniclelive.co.uk/incoming/article6027928.ece/alternates/s615/TRMRMMGLPICT000024785117o.jpg

That's living alright!

then maybe have a pint with the boys in a pub full of noise

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