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HDMI Cable - What should I buy?????

Liam5170 Avatar
8y, 3m agoPosted 8 years, 3 months ago
As a follow on to my previous post, I am now looking for a HDMI cable to link the blu-ray player to the TV. Any reccomendations???? I don't belive in paying £50 for something like a lead.......any advice welcolm
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Liam5170 Avatar
8y, 3m agoPosted 8 years, 3 months ago
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#1
A cheap lead will be fine.
Expensive cables are a con:
http://www.engadget.com/2008/03/03/audiophiles-cant-tell-the-difference-between-monster-cable-and/
Are poundland selling any?
#2
Get them from Home Bargains. They have gold plated connections and are only £2.99.

Think there's a thread on here about them as well :thumbsup:
banned#3
Unlike with scart (where a more expensive lead will make a difference), for HDMI a cheap £2.50 one will work exactly the same as one that comet will try to convince you that you need for £100.
banned#4
ebuyer

£2.99 with free delivery
#5
Now....i always thought a hdmi cable was the same as any hdmi cable, and i bought a cheap £7.99 from play. A very clued up friend recently told me about more expensive cables have a higher transfer rate and when you are playing a game or blu ray, cheaper cables can suffer a kind of 'lag'
I dont know if this is true, but ive noticed now when playing burnout, or gta4, when the game is moving quickly i see some 'lag'
I dont know if this is the cable....the tv...or the ps3.....but it makes me think.

Anyone have any ideas on this?
banned#6
shanecr
Now....i always thought a hdmi cable was the same as any hdmi cable, and i bought a cheap £7.99 from play. A very clued up friend recently told me about more expensive cables have a higher transfer rate and when you are playing a game or blu ray, cheaper cables can suffer a kind of 'lag'
I dont know if this is true, but ive noticed now when playing burnout, or gta4, when the game is moving quickly i see some 'lag'
I dont know if this is the cable....the tv...or the ps3.....but it makes me think.

Anyone have any ideas on this?


Yes, there are different versions or standards of HDMI. I believe its now up to V1.3 at the mo, so it was worthy to mention.

The newer standards do indeed have higher transfer speeds and also capable of transfering different audio types - but most would be redundand in current TVs.

But for general usage (eg Sky HD), a cheap HDMI will be sufficient.
1 Like #7
shanecr
Now....i always thought a hdmi cable was the same as any hdmi cable, and i bought a cheap £7.99 from play. A very clued up friend recently told me about more expensive cables have a higher transfer rate and when you are playing a game or blu ray, cheaper cables can suffer a kind of 'lag'
I dont know if this is true, but ive noticed now when playing burnout, or gta4, when the game is moving quickly i see some 'lag'
I dont know if this is the cable....the tv...or the ps3.....but it makes me think.

Anyone have any ideas on this?


Correct. For short distances, there should not be any difference between an expensive and cheaper HDMI cable because there is not enough distance to affect attenuation. For longer cables, the more expensive cables use better quality materials to reduce attenuation. It stands to reason that all materials that conduct electrical data will suffer from resistance and attenuation - the longer the distance the higher the attenuation (or degradation of signal) - it's simple electronics. Some materials are less resistant to electricity than others which is why more expensive cables will use materials that are less resistant to electrical data.

For those who think "it's digital so there is no possible loss of data", the truth is there most certainly is! A poor quality cable will result in blocky pitches or sound that may screech. Attenuation can cause the bit patterns to be sent incorrectly. Also don't forget that HDMI is used to transfer a digital signal, the actual electrical signal inside the HDMI cable is analogue and conversion to digital is used by measuring wavelength amplitudes of the analogue signal. Furthermore, using a long HDMI cable made from poor material will weaken the DDC signal required for HDCP decoding causing momentary blinking scenes on the screen. But remember, for short cables these should issues should not manifest themselves unless the cables compose of high electrical resistant materials such as zinc or steel.

So, for a short HDMI cable there should be no difference between a cheap cable or an expensive cable. For longer HDMI cables, it really would be judicious to pay more for a better quality cable.
#8
I just bought a 25m HDMI cable to play HD DVD from my computer in the Kitchen (Have LG Blu-Ray HL20 burner & HD DVD Player and thought that a good HD Film in with the family for less than £4 was better than going to cinema - and it was!) to my HD TV in the Family Room. Works Great & only cost £23 delivered.

I tried ebay but found that googling was every bit as good as I got the cable quickly and with low postage. I also bought 2 x 1.5m HDMI cables for bedroom TV's with PS3s attached for £10 delivered and againg they work great.

Hope this allays you fears :thumbsup:
#9
For those who do claiming that you need better quality cable for longer distances or for certain devices I'd like to ask - have you ever actually come across a cheap cable which doesn't do the job? I certainly haven't and I have never ever heard of anybody complaining that their cheapo cable gave them blocky graphics or **** sound.

The fact is that most of the "high quality" upgrades are actually trying to sell you something that you don't need and the claims are often based on dodgy science. This has been going on in the audio world for years and now it is spilling over into the digital world. The audio world is particularly bad for this sort of con. You can even buy $500 "audio quality" ethernet cables: http://blog.wired.com/gadgets/2008/06/snake-oil-alert.html - but they won't make any audible difference to your sound.

I seriously doubt that you will be able to find an HDMI cable which won't be sufficient quality for your TV.
#10
Damn - double post - never managed to do that on any forum before!
#11
Spod
For those who do claiming that you need better quality cable for longer distances or for certain devices I'd like to ask - have you ever actually come across a cheap cable which doesn't do the job? I certainly haven't and I have never ever heard of anybody complaining that their cheapo cable gave them blocky graphics or **** sound.

The fact is that most of the "high quality" upgrades are actually trying to sell you something that you don't need and the claims are often based on dodgy science. This has been going on in the audio world for years and now it is spilling over into the digital world. The audio world is particularly bad for this sort of con. You can even buy $500 "audio quality" ethernet cables: http://blog.wired.com/gadgets/2008/06/snake-oil-alert.html - but they won't make any audible difference to your sound.

I seriously doubt that you will be able to find an HDMI cable which won't be sufficient quality for your TV.



Question 1: What is the bandwidth required to send stereo sound or even multi channel sound?
Question 2: What is the bandwidth required for transmission of HD content AND HD audio?

It is quite evident that there is more margin for attenuation with speaker cables than HDMI cables. It is quite simple electronics that all electrical signals will suffer from attenuation. That is why longer HDMI cables are more easily affected by attenuation than speaker cables due to the much higher bandwidth of HD content than simple audio signals (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hdmi under section Cable Length)).

For a very thorough and scientific guide on how HDMI cable lengths are affected by attenuation, see http://www.audioholics.com/education/cables/long-hdmi-cable-bench-tests.

The article you posted actually contradicts your comments to some extent - if you read carefully you will see it.
#12
ElliottC
It is quite evident that there is more margin for attenuation with speaker cables than HDMI cables. It is quite simple electronics that all electrical signals will suffer from attenuation. That is why longer HDMI cables are more easily affected by attenuation than speaker cables due to the much higher bandwidth of HD content than simple audio signals (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hdmi under section Cable Length)).

For a very thorough and scientific guide on how HDMI cable lengths are affected by attenuation, see http://www.audioholics.com/education/cables/long-hdmi-cable-bench-tests.

The article you posted actually contradicts your comments to some extent - if you read carefully you will see it.


While all of that has some truth in it, probably 99% of all hifi and digital cables sold are 2 metres or less in length and you really won't see or hear any improvement with an expensive cable over a cheap one at that sort of cable length - and even on longer cables I've still yet to hear anybody complain that they had poor results because of buying a cheap cable.
#13
csiman
ebuyer

£2.99 with free delivery


free delivery ?
#14
To the OP, buy the cheapest HDMI cable you can find, paying more will not make a scrap of difference.

Don't even bother with gold plated connections, chances are your TV etc. will only have nickel plated connectors anyway.
#15
Just grab any old one. They all do the same job :)

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