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Help with computer stuff

scubapaula Avatar
6y, 1m agoPosted 6 years, 1 month ago
Right can someone please tell me in english noddy speak what is the difference between.

Servers, clusters,nodes, blades and the like?????
scubapaula Avatar
6y, 1m agoPosted 6 years, 1 month ago
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2 Likes #1
'Servers' are bowls or large plates. Clusters are a cereal. 'Nodes' is the sound of an obese person saying 'no'. 'Blades' are a sharp metal object where the sharp runs the length of the object.
#2
yes very good but not quite what I had in mind....
#3
Sounds like homework / coursework to me
#4
Since the context is networking, a server is a computer that provides services to connected clients, usually through a network. As an example, if you are accessing a website, that website is hosted on a server and your computer is the client as it is receiving services.

A blade server is essentially a space saving computer that acts as a server but lacks certain components which prevents it being able to operate independently. For example, it may lack its own PSU for mains connection and requires powering from a single point that powers a complete blade system.

Any point in a network that is used for redistribution the network signals or a point of termination is called a node. Taking the internet, for example, the telephone exchange acts as a node as it redistributes the broadband signals to homes. At each home, there is a modem that converts analogue signals above the voice frequencies to digital signals. At this juncture, we have another node. The clients that connect to the modem usually acts as termination points and once again, these are nodes too.


Edited By: ElliottC on Nov 07, 2010 19:33: .
#5
Presumably a group of nodes attached to a server is a cluster
#6
Server = Just that, it's a PC/Rackmount Server

Cluster = More than one Server (Node), usually built for resilience (Active Node, Passive Node) and usually mirrored so if one fails, the other takes over and lessens downtime.

Node = A server that is part of a Cluster (as above, Passive or Active).

Blade Server = Space saving server placed in a Blade Chassis (rack mounted).

Why you after this info?
#7
Hey ElliottC. thanks for your reply. very useful.
Really kind of what i thought really. just other bits of space within the server willing to do certain processes for you.
all seperate so it doesnt clog up the main part.
#8
guilbert53
Sounds like homework / coursework to me


thats so funny.. no its not homework. have my own idea what its all about just needed it confirmed.
#9
I work with it all and i have worked with it all for many years.. its just got past that time that i can ask without looking like a numpty... i get that there all the same sort of thing but working on a cautious side and protecting each layer if you like.
#10
scubapaula
I work with it all and i have worked with it all for many years.. its just got past that time that i can ask without looking like a numpty... i get that there all the same sort of thing but working on a cautious side and protecting each layer if you like.

Please don't take this the wrong way, but I don't get what you are trying to say here or achieve by asking the questions if it's something you already work with?
#11
sancho1983
Presumably a group of nodes attached to a server is a cluster

Ooops, missed out cluster. They are usually a group of computers working with one another to act as a single node. Typical examples of usage is for load balancing or resiliance. So for a telephony system, there may be several computers that receives incoming calls. The amount of incoming calls are balanced amongst the cluster of computers although a client will see this as one computer receiving many calls. There may be additional computers used for resilience purposes so in the event of one failing, switchover to another will occur but once again, the client is oblivious to this.
#12
Right i never know how to write this stuff.
They are like partitions so you can run jobs on each of them and arrange then over the space provided so not to clog up the system and if something happens then the other jobs are safe.
#13
scubapaula
Right i never know how to write this stuff. They are like partitions so you can run jobs on each of them and arrange then over the space provided so not to clog up the system and if something happens then the other jobs are safe.

Do you mean that jobs are run in such a way that the load is balanced over several servers. Since the jobs are distributed evenly, in the event of failure of a server, other jobs are unaffected as each job runs independently of one another.

How long have you been working in the industry? You should really know server-client architecture even if you are completely new in your job. Regarding "not knowing how to write this stuff", once you have written a few technical documents you will get the hang of writing articles unequivocally.
#14
yeah thats about what I am meaning.. hehe...
Just wanted to see if I was on the right page that was all. Oh my industry really isnt IT as such and I wont be writing any documents believe me. Just have to use these things to run my processing jobs.
oh now I probably have confused you... We use them for the power in them.
#15
scubapaula
yeah thats about what I am meaning.. hehe... Just wanted to see if I was on the right page that was all. Oh my industry really isnt IT as such and I wont be writing any documents believe me. Just have to use these things to run my processing jobs. oh now I probably have confused you... We use them for the power in them.

Oh I see now. You will probably be fine just knowing client/server technology. The names do frighten many people but they have everday English usage so if you remember that, it should be easy to learn the terminology and apply them in speech. Both the words client and server exists in standard vocabulary and their definitions in computing are virtually identical. Somebody earlier had a very good attempt at the definition of a cluster based on how we use that word in everyday language. Soon, you will impress your colleagues with your knowledge of client/server technology!
#16
Thanks again Elliott. I did just needed someone else to put it in a way that I can understand and to my surprise I was on the right track. I know I would look a right tool if I asked people at work now. but then people just assume you know.
#17
scubapaula
Thanks again Elliott. I did just needed someone else to put it in a way that I can understand and to my surprise I was on the right track. I know I would look a right tool if I asked people at work now. but then people just assume you know.

What do you mean "to my surprise"? You should believe in yourself.

If you are working in a technical capacity (which I wrongly assumed earlier) then you should be very worried at not being au fait with rudimentary terms but since you are not working in a technical capacity, there is no shame in asking. I agree that colleagues do assume knowledge, I've been in a similar situation before. One project I worked on involved telephony systems and the project leader (not realising that I did not have a telecommunications background) was talking to in such a way that I had difficulties in grasping the concept. I had no choice but to ask as it was my first venture into telecommunications.
#18
good for you for asking..
I work offshore in the oil industry and the work i do uses a lot of space. The data we produce is huge and so we need big storage areas for it all. Hence the huge servers. Which are then partitioned into all these other bits and bobs so we can share the work load around them all cause some of our processing tasks takes days to run...
so yeah its quite technical really..
Thats why i thought that it was quite funny for someone saying it was homework.. hehe

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