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How old is this Grandpa?

skusey Avatar
7y, 11m agoPosted 7 years, 11 months ago
One evening a grandson was talking to his grandfather about current events.
The grandson asked his grandfather what he thought about the shootings at schools, the computer age, and just things in general.

The Grandfather replied, 'Well, let me think a minute, I was born before:

'television

'penicillin

'polio shots

'frozen foods

'Xerox

'contact lenses

'Frisbees and

'the pill

There were no:

'credit cards

'laser beams or

'ball-point pens

Man had not invented:

'pantyhose

'air conditioners

'dishwashers

'clothes dryers

'and the clothes were hung out to dry in the fresh air and

'man hadn't yet walked on the moon

Your Grandmother and I got married first, . . And then lived together.

Every family had a father and a mother.

Until I was 25, I called every man older than me, 'Sir'.
And after I turned 25, I still called policemen and every man with a title, 'Sir.'

We were before gay-rights, computer- dating, dual careers, daycare centers, and group therapy.

Our lives were governed by the Ten Commandments, good judgment, and common sense.

We were taught to know the difference between right and wrong and to stand up and take responsibility for our actions.

Serving your country was a privilege; living in this country was a bigger privilege.

We thought fast food was what people ate during Lent.

Having a meaningful relationship meant getting along with your cousins.

Draft dodgers were people who closed their front doors when the evening breeze started.

Time-sharing meant time the family spent together in the evenings and weekends-not purchasing condominiums.
We never heard of FM radios, tape decks, CDs, electric typewriters, yogurt, or guys wearing earrings.

We listened to the Big Bands, Jack Benny, and the President's speeches on our radios.

And I don't ever remember any kid blowing his brains out listening to Tommy Dorsey.

If you saw anything with 'Made in Japan ' on it, it was junk

The term 'making out' referred to how you did on your school exam.

Pizza Hut, McDonald's, and instant coffee were unheard of.

We had 5 &10-cent stores where you could actually buy things for 5 and 10 cents.

Ice-cream cones, phone calls, rides on a streetcar, and a Pepsi were all a nickel.

And if you didn't want to splurge, you could spend your nickel on enough stamps to mail 1 letter and 2 postcards.

You could buy a new Chevy Coupe for $600, . .. . But who could afford one?
Too bad, because gas was 11 cents a gallon..

In my day:

''grass' was mowed,

''coke' was a cold drink,

''pot' was something your mother cooked in and

''rock music' was your grandmother's lullaby.

''Aids' were helpers in the Principal's office,

'' chip' meant a piece of wood,

''hardware' was found in a hardware store and

''software' wasn't even a word.
And we were the last generation to actually believe that a lady needed a husband to have a baby. No wonder people call us 'old and confused' and say there is a generation gap... And how old do you think I am?

I bet you have this old man in mind...you are in for a shock!





This man would be 58 years old.
skusey Avatar
7y, 11m agoPosted 7 years, 11 months ago
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(11) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
amazing how fast things have moved in the last few decades
#2
Wow only 58 years - that's scary. My Dad is getting on for 80 - things must be very strange for him!
#3
Television was invented in 1920?
#4
László Bíró, a Hungarian newspaper editor, was frustrated by the amount of time that he wasted in filling up fountain pens and cleaning up smudged pages, and the sharp tip of his fountain pen often tore his pages of newsprint. Bíró had noticed that the type of ink used in newspaper printing dried quickly, leaving the paper dry and smudge free. He decided to create a pen using the same type of ink. Since, when tried, this viscous ink would not flow into a regular fountain pen nib, Bíró, with the help of his brother George, a chemist, began to work on designing new types of pens. Bíró fitted this pen with a tiny ball in its tip that was free to turn in a socket. As the pen moved along the paper, the ball rotated, picking up ink from the ink cartridge and leaving it on the paper. Bíró filed a British patent on 15 June 1938.
#5
Benson's Bargain
Television was invented in 1920?


correct;
Invention of the Television
The Scotsman John Logie Baird invented television in the 1920s, by bringing together the work of some others, notably Paul Nipkow, who invented a spinning disk used to scan the image.

The first public demonstration of television was by John Logie Baird in Hastings, England in 1923. An official blue plaque marks the house where this took place. Hastings Museum hold various pieces of related correspondence. A further demonstration subsequently took place in a department store, Selfridges, in London England, by Mr Baird himself. This took place in 1925. The system was successful enough to become commercialised, and the BBC began the world's first regular television broadcasts, using the Baird system, in 1936. By 1939, there were over 20,000 TV sets in use in and around London. A year later, in 1940, baird demonstrated a set which was capable of receiving colour pictures and stereo sound!

The problem with the Baird system is that it was mechanical in design, and so it was unreliable. For this reason, it was eventually superceded by a system based on Farnsworth's development of an electronic system.

So, in answer to the question, "When was television invented?", although many people had a hand in it, the best answer is probably that it was developed in the early twentieth century, but television service as we know it began in 1936.

The first concept of the television was a sketch done by a 14-year-old farm boy named Philo T. Farnsworth in 1922. On September 7, 1927, he finally created a television system that could not only display, but transmit signals between seperate rooms. (see above)
#6
sancho1983
László Bíró, a Hungarian newspaper editor, was frustrated by the amount of time that he wasted in filling up fountain pens and cleaning up smudged pages, and the sharp tip of his fountain pen often tore his pages of newsprint. Bíró had noticed that the type of ink used in newspaper printing dried quickly, leaving the paper dry and smudge free. He decided to create a pen using the same type of ink. Since, when tried, this viscous ink would not flow into a regular fountain pen nib, Bíró, with the help of his brother George, a chemist, began to work on designing new types of pens. Bíró fitted this pen with a tiny ball in its tip that was free to turn in a socket. As the pen moved along the paper, the ball rotated, picking up ink from the ink cartridge and leaving it on the paper. Bíró filed a British patent on 15 June 1938.


Soz i deleted the Biro pen quote, i got my dates mixed up thought it was about 1910! LOL
#7
Interesting thread!
#8
skusey
correct;
Invention of the Television
The Scotsman John Logie Baird invented television in the 1920s, by bringing together the work of some others, notably Paul Nipkow, who invented a spinning disk used to scan the image.

The first public demonstration of television was by John Logie Baird in Hastings, England in 1923. An official blue plaque marks the house where this took place. Hastings Museum hold various pieces of related correspondence. A further demonstration subsequently took place in a department store, Selfridges, in London England, by Mr Baird himself. This took place in 1925. The system was successful enough to become commercialised, and the BBC began the world's first regular television broadcasts, using the Baird system, in 1936. By 1939, there were over 20,000 TV sets in use in and around London. A year later, in 1940, baird demonstrated a set which was capable of receiving colour pictures and stereo sound!

The problem with the Baird system is that it was mechanical in design, and so it was unreliable. For this reason, it was eventually superceded by a system based on Farnsworth's development of an electronic system.

So, in answer to the question, "When was television invented?", although many people had a hand in it, the best answer is probably that it was developed in the early twentieth century, but television service as we know it began in 1936.

The first concept of the television was a sketch done by a 14-year-old farm boy named Philo T. Farnsworth in 1922. On September 7, 1927, he finally created a television system that could not only display, but transmit signals between seperate rooms. (see above)


Fair do's i'll get me coat, :whistling:
#9
Benson's Bargain
Soz i deleted the Biro pen quote, i got my dates mixed up thought it was about 1910! LOL


Lots of confusion about when it was invented, the british patent was awarded to Biro then, but people argue they invented it earlier, only the same as Da Vinci 'inventing' the hlicopter imo
#10
I think your grandad is getting a bit 'senior' memory-wise. Penicillin was in mass production by the end of the Second WW and was responsible for masssively reducing the death rate from infected wounds.

I know what he means though!! ;-):roll: Don't get me started on mangles!!
#11
The Times (30 May 1914) noted:

"An inventor, Dr A M Low, has discovered a means of transmitting visual images by wire. If all goes well with this invention, we shall soon be able, it seems, to see people at a distance."

Way before John Logie Baird.

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