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I want............................

emmalampkin Avatar
6y, 5m agoPosted 6 years, 5 months ago
You know whaen you really, really, really, really, really want something but you cant have it....

Thats happening to me. right now....


I want an I-Pad.

I cant have one till after the wedding which makes me SULK, and i get even sulkier when the advert on the Tv comes on.. I want Want...

Thats it.. Oh and i dont suppose anyone wants to buy me one??
Anyone got one aswell...?
emmalampkin Avatar
6y, 5m agoPosted 6 years, 5 months ago
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(21) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
i want one but cant help but think £400 will get you a decent laptop which can do what it can and alot more... undecided.
#2
I have a decent Laptop though, well i paid £800 for it and its broke twice... go figure but performance wise i love it. x
#3
ive got one and it has caused my friend to have the same reaction as you. Her partner keeps txting to complain that her nagging is driving her mad lol
#4
Ipad's are pointless, Such a waste.
#5
Had one from America, played with it got bored of it and sold it!
Spend half my time cleaning it and trying not to drop it!

All you need is to have a go on one............dont buy one until you've had a play with one!

Total waste of money! :thumbsup:
#6
Apart from having a bigger display, it's just a more expensive iPod Touch. An iPod Touch that you won't want to take out of the house, that you'll have to keep cleaning, that will make your arms hurt when holding it for any length of time, and that you can't pop in your handbag or pocket. You can get an 8gb iPod Touch for around £135 if you shop about too - a third of the price of the iPad!
#7
Why do you want one so bad?
Really cant see their appeal personally.
#8
You mean your fiancée still has time to pull out of this?

A lifetime of 'I want!' - no ta! :lol:
banned#9
I know the feeling.......................................................................................
banned#10
SirBargainsALot
Apart from having a bigger display, it's just a more expensive iPod Touch. An iPod Touch that you won't want to take out of the house, that you'll have to keep cleaning, that will make your arms hurt when holding it for any length of time, and that you can't pop in your handbag or pocket. You can get an 8gb iPod Touch for around £135 if you shop about too - a third of the price of the iPad!


The whole point of it is that its a large ipod touch! Geeze. Feel free to hate it, but what you just posted is rubbish.
#11
moob
You mean your fiancée still has time to pull out of this?

A lifetime of 'I want!' - no ta! :lol:


Pull out, why would he want to pull out, im a beauty me :-D
#12
Babbabooey
Why do you want one so bad?
Really cant see their appeal personally.


I like the look of them , i like all the apps they have aswell and i want a new toy to play with (no adult jokes please)... :whistling:
#13
emmalampkin
Pull out, why would he want to pull out, im a beauty me :-D


And yet you didn't feel the need to say no adult jokes to this :whistling:
#14
emmalampkin
Pull out, why would he want to pull out, im a beauty me :-D


Maybe you are sweetheart, but he could save himself a lifetime of you stomping your feet when you don't get what you want. :lol:
#15
moob
Maybe you are sweetheart, but he could save himself a lifetime of you stomping your feet when you don't get what you want. :lol:


But i havent stomped my feet at him. I sulk towards myself not him.
So na na na na na na :-D
#16
natversion1
And yet you didn't feel the need to say no adult jokes to this :whistling:


Filthy!! haha:giggle:
#17
After admitting my love for Charlie Brooker, a few hours after that little crack ***** from Blue Peter did.

This is what he thinks of the iPad.



The iPad: the world's most expensive rectangle. The Guardian wanted me to write a first-impressions review on launch day – but how? I could borrow one from an early adopter, but that wouldn't be the same. I don't like poking round other people's computers. It's like snooping through their medicine cabinets: quite quickly you can stumble across something you wish you hadn't seen. I needed a new one, straight out of the packaging. A new one I could keep.

But this being launch day, iPads were bound to be scarcer than cats' eggs, right? Disappointingly, the Guardian picked one up from the Tottenham Court Road branch of PC World without having to kill anyone.

Typically for Apple, the packaging virtually places the device in your hands with the grace of a well-trained butler. The iPad itself is surprisingly heavy: about the same as a hardback book. It gave me mild arm ache almost immediately. Maybe there's an app that can tell you how many calories you're burning just by holding it. The best solution is to adopt a self-consciously casual crossed-legged sitting position, and prop it up with your thigh. Fanboys who wet themselves may cause a short circuit.

The display is extremely glossy, so the first thing you'll see on your screen is a reflection of your face from an unflattering angle. It also doubles as a fingerprint collector, which means you'll spend the first hour obsessively wiping it clean on your T-shirt before giving up and ordering an adhesive screen protector from Amazon (which, if the iPhone equivalents are anything to go by, will be impossible to apply without contemplating suicide at least twice). At this price, Apple – nice, friendly Apply – could at least include a couple of free screen protectors and some kind of carry-case, no? Of course not.

You're required to use iTunes during the setup process, which is like being forced to eat a handful of mud. iTunes is twice as awful as any software crime Microsoft ever inflicted on the world. Up popped a progress bar which turned out to be a work of satirical fiction – lodging fast at 7/8ths complete while making random claims about how long it was going to take to finish. It was impossible to tell if it had crashed or was just being sarcastic. I was scared to pull the sync cable out– and I'm a nerd. So much for Macs being easy to use. Eventually a nice man from MacFormat magazine saw me moaning about it on Twitter and gave me some personal assistance. Your experience may differ.

Eventually it was up and running. And yes, if you've used an iPhone, it's a bit of an anticlimax, although toying with it is undeniably pleasant. The display is supernaturally crisp; the seamless, intuitive interface becomes second nature almost immediately. Once you've got used to the weight, it's perfect for browsing websites while lounging on the sofa. I don't mean that dismissively: it's quite an achievement – especially since "browsing websites while lounging on the sofa" is what the vast majority of laptops are currently used for.

So websites look great on it. As does video. The BBC iPlayer is particularly impressive. But books? Here, I'm less convinced. Kindle owners can download a free app which lets them access their books on the iPad; Apple also has its own rival iBook service. In both cases the screen looks superb, and swiping a finger across the screen to flip the page gives you an undeniable futuristic thrill. But the display, luminously gorgeous when replaying video, is simply not suited for reading articles at length.Yes, you can adjust the brightness, but it's still firing light into your pupils, unlike an ebook screen, with its poncey "electronic ink".

I doubt many readers will persevere to the final page of a novel, unless it's a book in which the lead character squints a lot, in which case you'll have a certain empathy.

Magazines and newspapers, with their shorter read times, may be a different matter. The Guardian's Eyewitness app, a free interactive gallery of recent photojournalism, looks and feels like the future. If print media really wants to make the transition to devices like these, thinking long and hard about the visual, it needs to think long and hard about the full visual potential.

So do you actually need one? Having used one for the past few hours, I can confidently state that you can safely wait until it's lighter and cheaper. At the very least, wait until they bring out an app that turns the iPad into a talking Lord Lucan mask which you can hold up in front of your own face and talk through. If there isn't one already.
#18
emmalampkin
But i havent stomped my feet at him. I sulk towards myself not him.
So na na na na na na :-D


Trust me, after being with my wife for over a decade - sulking to yourself is just as bad.;-)

On the plus side, it's easier to ignore.:thumbsup:
#19
vibeone
The whole point of it is that its a large ipod touch! Geeze. Feel free to hate it, but what you just posted is rubbish.


I don't hate it, I think it's ace and I'd like one. But I already own an iPod Touch and certainly can't afford £400+ for something that I already have a smaller version of.

Having used an iPad, it's not just a large iPod Touch - it has the productivity software, it supports 2 player gaming on one screen, the sceen is better and brighter, the battery life is better, native apps work differently enough for it to standalone, the keyboard can actually be used like a keyboard...differences are numerous...

My point - being that you seemed to miss it - was that most people want it 'cos it's a gorgeous bit of kit...so why not get a smaller but equally gorgeous bit of kit and spend a third of the dosh? If you fully realise what it does, and how it's different to existing gadgets (iPod Touch included) then getting an iPad will never be a waste of money.

Every single thing I wrote though, is fact. But thanks for trashing it to look the big man...love you too man...
#20
SirB- Dont take it to heart, i appreciate what you wrote anyway :)
#21
mr.potato_head
After admitting my love for Charlie Brooker, a few hours after that little crack ***** from Blue Peter did.

This is what he thinks of the iPad.



The iPad: the world's most expensive rectangle. The Guardian wanted me to write a first-impressions review on launch day – but how? I could borrow one from an early adopter, but that wouldn't be the same. I don't like poking round other people's computers. It's like snooping through their medicine cabinets: quite quickly you can stumble across something you wish you hadn't seen. I needed a new one, straight out of the packaging. A new one I could keep.

But this being launch day, iPads were bound to be scarcer than cats' eggs, right? Disappointingly, the Guardian picked one up from the Tottenham Court Road branch of PC World without having to kill anyone.

Typically for Apple, the packaging virtually places the device in your hands with the grace of a well-trained butler. The iPad itself is surprisingly heavy: about the same as a hardback book. It gave me mild arm ache almost immediately. Maybe there's an app that can tell you how many calories you're burning just by holding it. The best solution is to adopt a self-consciously casual crossed-legged sitting position, and prop it up with your thigh. Fanboys who wet themselves may cause a short circuit.

The display is extremely glossy, so the first thing you'll see on your screen is a reflection of your face from an unflattering angle. It also doubles as a fingerprint collector, which means you'll spend the first hour obsessively wiping it clean on your T-shirt before giving up and ordering an adhesive screen protector from Amazon (which, if the iPhone equivalents are anything to go by, will be impossible to apply without contemplating suicide at least twice). At this price, Apple – nice, friendly Apply – could at least include a couple of free screen protectors and some kind of carry-case, no? Of course not.

You're required to use iTunes during the setup process, which is like being forced to eat a handful of mud. iTunes is twice as awful as any software crime Microsoft ever inflicted on the world. Up popped a progress bar which turned out to be a work of satirical fiction – lodging fast at 7/8ths complete while making random claims about how long it was going to take to finish. It was impossible to tell if it had crashed or was just being sarcastic. I was scared to pull the sync cable out– and I'm a nerd. So much for Macs being easy to use. Eventually a nice man from MacFormat magazine saw me moaning about it on Twitter and gave me some personal assistance. Your experience may differ.

Eventually it was up and running. And yes, if you've used an iPhone, it's a bit of an anticlimax, although toying with it is undeniably pleasant. The display is supernaturally crisp; the seamless, intuitive interface becomes second nature almost immediately. Once you've got used to the weight, it's perfect for browsing websites while lounging on the sofa. I don't mean that dismissively: it's quite an achievement – especially since "browsing websites while lounging on the sofa" is what the vast majority of laptops are currently used for.

So websites look great on it. As does video. The BBC iPlayer is particularly impressive. But books? Here, I'm less convinced. Kindle owners can download a free app which lets them access their books on the iPad; Apple also has its own rival iBook service. In both cases the screen looks superb, and swiping a finger across the screen to flip the page gives you an undeniable futuristic thrill. But the display, luminously gorgeous when replaying video, is simply not suited for reading articles at length.Yes, you can adjust the brightness, but it's still firing light into your pupils, unlike an ebook screen, with its poncey "electronic ink".

I doubt many readers will persevere to the final page of a novel, unless it's a book in which the lead character squints a lot, in which case you'll have a certain empathy.

Magazines and newspapers, with their shorter read times, may be a different matter. The Guardian's Eyewitness app, a free interactive gallery of recent photojournalism, looks and feels like the future. If print media really wants to make the transition to devices like these, thinking long and hard about the visual, it needs to think long and hard about the full visual potential.

So do you actually need one? Having used one for the past few hours, I can confidently state that you can safely wait until it's lighter and cheaper. At the very least, wait until they bring out an app that turns the iPad into a talking Lord Lucan mask which you can hold up in front of your own face and talk through. If there isn't one already.


fab read!!

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