ID card contract plans announced! - HotUKDeals
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ID card contract plans announced!

kippy Avatar
8y, 3w agoPosted 8 years, 3 weeks ago
Woke up and saw this bit of news:

"A plan for private firms, shops and the Royal Mail to bid for contracts to fingerprint millions of people for the new identity cards is being unveiled.

ID card contract plans announced
The Government is aiming to contract out the task of gathering biometric data for new passports and ID to the private sector, according to reports.

Applicants will have all ten fingerprints and their faces scanned. The data will then be passed to the Identity and Passport Service to be stored on the new, computerised National Identity Register.

A Home Office spokeswoman confirmed that the Government wanted to create a network of places where people could easily go to complete the application procedures for the biometric documents.

The spokeswoman said: "We are going to have open discussions with organisations."

"The Passport Service needs to develop a network of convenient outlets in the UK that customers can visit."

The Home Secretary Jacqui Smith is also expected to disclose that the cost of the scheme - previously estimated at £4.5 billion - is now put at closer to £5 billion."

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any thoughts?
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kippy Avatar
8y, 3w agoPosted 8 years, 3 weeks ago
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#1
Some background
(25th Sept 08)

"Almost 600 years ago, Henry V created the world's first passports. They were designed to help prove who you were if you travelled to a foreign land.

Within weeks, people who have come from abroad will be the first people in modern Britain to be given ID cards.

From late November the UK Border Agency will roll out the first part of the controversial identity card scheme which, Parliament permitting, will register everyone living in the UK.

At present, a legally-resident foreign national has a sticker or stamp in their passport. If they go for a job, a scrupulous employer can make checks to ensure they are not about to employ an illegal immigrant.
That's all changing.

The new cards, complete with fingerprints encoded on a chip, replace the passport stickers.
[COLOR="Purple"](note i just found out this 'sticker' costs £160 by post or £500 in person, if you are a successful applicant)[/COLOR]
They will initially only apply to people who live in Britain as a student or through a marriage visa - a small proportion of the overall number of migrants.

ID CARDS TIMETABLE
Nov: First foreign nationals
2009: Airport workers
2010: Voluntary take-up
2011: High volume roll-out
2015: 90% foreign nationals covered
2017: Full roll-out?

But eventually, any foreign national from outside the European Union over the age of six will be called to an immigration agency office and asked to put their hands on a scanner.

The card, rather than the passport, will become proof of a holder's right to stay, work or study in the country. It will be a recognisable form of identification for opening a bank account or applying for benefits.
But are the cards really needed?

The UK's immigration system is halfway through its own cultural revolution with ministers trying to win back public trust.

Government needs to convince people times have changed - and biometric, secure identity cards are part of that story.

Supporters of cards predict they will help to combat illegal working and enable public bodies, employers, colleges to work out precisely who they are dealing with.

'Softening up'
But according to critics, the second reason for the cards is more political.

Officially, the cards are not part of a National Identity Register - the grand machinery which underpins the whole idea of a universal card.

They are in fact a residence permit similar to other EU schemes.

BIOMETRICS
Cards will hold fingerprints
Image of face
Eye scans dropped

How biometric technology works
Home Office opponents accuse it of playing a very clever game with foreign national identity.
The people selected for the first wave of cards will have no choice - it will be part of the process of a legal right to stay.

The next group to receive ID cards will be anyone (including Britons) working in "sensitive" jobs such as airports - and again the employees will need the document to go about their business.

The Home Secretary says these workers will benefit from a card that guarantees their identity - but conceded at the foreign ID card that airport staff already face more security checks than those required for the national scheme.

Opponents say this all smacks of a "softening up" exercise for the general population.

They accuse the government of incrementally chipping away at opposition by slowly bringing everyone in to the register over a decade, without having to win a debate over its actual merits.

People with the least power to complain are being used as "guinea pigs" for an untried and controversial system.

No 'magic bullet'
The Home Office says the foreign national card has many practical purposes.
It argues the card is a positive thing for the migrant - an easy way to assert one's identity and acceptance into British society.

But there are also an awful lot of migrants living and working without permission in the UK.

Critics say the card is no magic bullet for people who are invisible - people who survive in the black economy working for people who don't care about doing things by the book.

The Conservatives have raised no objections to collecting biometric identity data on foreign nationals. But they object fiercely to the idea of a national identity register because they believe it is neither workable nor needed.

So while the Home Office pushes ahead with the £4.7bn scheme, its survival may hinge on the outcome of the next general election.

But here's another thought.
Officials confidently predict that every new immigrant will be given a card within three years - and that nine out of 10 foreign nationals already in the UK (legally) will be in the scheme by 2015.

We've never had a reliable figure for how many people come and go each year - which means that public tension over migration is based on only half the picture.

All those biometric records beeping away at airports may soon help to answer those questions once and for all. "
#2
http://d.yimg.com/i/ng/ne/itn/20081106/06/2985377039-id-card-contract-plans-announced.jpg#300,225

my questions are:
isn't the passport enough?
isn't CRB check enough?
who's paying for each card?
who can you trust to keep your info - given so many incidents of lost records?
this will lead to eventual national ID cards. what are your concerns?
[mod]#3
Sounds good to me...........will be easier to track people who commit crimes. People who behave don't have anything to worry about. :)
#4
This Government is desperate to get this in any way they can. I don't mind the idea, but am a little concerned about where it will lead. I see a Nazi / Police State where everyone will have to be electronically tagged. When that happens, I am getting out of this country :)
#5
I remember reading somewhere that we have to pay for our own cards
#6
seems like a bargain at the price
#7
another question:
would they then not make this card ONE card, which contains your biometric info + is your bank card + your nhs health card + passport. what happens if my id card was nicked and someone else used it, would i get some guarantee that fraud will not happen? who will pay for that?

and ... who will pay for the scanners and rows of barrier machines you will need to have

the oyster card had a serious problem a few months ago ('hack-able' by uni students).
who will guarantee there is no leak of info?
banned#8
jonfac;3384372
I remember reading somewhere that we have to pay for our own cards

you will. estimate is £130 per person renewable every 10 years.

I dont mind this so much if they replace passports but they wont so that another £220 in tax every 10 years!

not to mention your data being widely available once some muppet loses a few data disks ;)

contract is bound to go to eds (now HP) as they seem to get all the big government contracts despite always going 3 times over budget with a system not fit for purpose (e.g. CSA, NHS, Inland Revenue). I wonder how many MP's are non-execs on the board ;-)
banned#9
kippy;3384511
another question:
would they then not make this card ONE card, which contains your biometric info + is your bank card + your nhs health card + passport. what happens if my id card was nicked and someone else used it, would i get some guarantee that fraud will not happen? who will pay for that?

and ... who will pay for the scanners and rows of barrier machines you will need to have

the oyster card had a serious problem a few months ago ('hack-able' by uni students).
who will guarantee there is no leak of info?

no, it will only contain biometric data so you can identify yourself. It will soon get hacked though as nothing is hack proof so it will serve little useful purpose considering the costs involved.

it is not even going to be mandatory to carry it.

I think this could be the next governments poll tax!
#10
waste of public money IMHO. like you said, there are far too many muppets, to be entrusted with this great responsibility of personal data. where will it end - DNA samples. if this goes through i'd like to know what info is collected. they collected people's dna samples under pretext of a trial or an unncessary check and suddenly we have many people's dna collected without them knowing it was for the national register. there are a worrying amount of children/teen dna identities on register too!
banned#11
kippy;3384550
waste of public money IMHO. like you said, there are far too many muppets, to be entrusted with this great responsibility of personal data. where will it end - DNA samples. if this goes through i'd like to know what info is collected. they collected people's dna samples under pretext of a trial or an unncessary check and suddenly we have many people's dna collected without them knowing it was for the national register. there are a worrying amount of children/teen dna identities on register too!

I've never quiet understood this DNA database. I thought DNA could establish identity with a factor of about a million to one. Surely if everyone was on a DNA database then 70 people would be a suspect in any crime where DNA was discovered :?

not to mention the fact people leave DNA practically everywhere they go!
#12
I dont mind carrying a identity card if it is free , but I strongly protest to have to pay for something I personally dont need . I have a driving licence and Passport already , this should be good enough .
In any case ,whatever happens these new cards will be quickly copied and cloned , it happens now . If anyone saw the Despatches report on TV early in the year , you can buy fake passports , driving licences , utillity bills , credit cards and just about everything else if you know the right people . The more information this Government has about an individual the more the information is leeked or lost or stolen ...............very worrying .
I think we should boycott any move towards a paid for card .
#13
Thin edge of the police state wedge IMO.
#14
kippy
another question:
would they then not make this card ONE card, which contains your biometric info + is your bank card + your nhs health card + passport. what happens if my id card was nicked and someone else used it, would i get some guarantee that fraud will not happen? who will pay for that?

and ... who will pay for the scanners and rows of barrier machines you will need to have

the oyster card had a serious problem a few months ago ('hack-able' by uni students).
who will guarantee there is no leak of info?


They would probably implement a replacement for the chip and pin thing where instead they use your fingerprint to confirm you are the cardholder. Then the only way it would be useful to someone who nicked your card would be to also cut off your finger.
#15
so i this just for people who come to the uk or for people who live in the uk?
#16
deathtrap3000
They would probably implement a replacement for the chip and pin thing where instead they use your fingerprint to confirm you are the cardholder. Then the only way it would be useful to someone who nicked your card would be to also cut off your finger.


it'd be my 3rd finger ... lol

---- mum2be
it starts with the visitors then guess what, they'll come up with stats proving it's so necessary it will be imposed on the nationals.

someone had a theory that ken livingstone tampered with the traffic lights when recording data for congestion charge argument/implementation basically it's another unnecessary (and messy) tax, london is still congested! there are always ways!
banned#17
just vote tory as they will bin this can of worms
#18
haha sorry, given their history i dont trust the torys one bit.
#19
kippy
it'd be my 3rd finger ... lol


lucky you..... some ugly folk dont get that much action in a lifetime...... sorry wrong thread. :whistling:

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