If a Under 16 year old got charged for stealing would his record be cleared shortly after? - HotUKDeals
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If a Under 16 year old got charged for stealing would his record be cleared shortly after?

Nick_ Avatar
7y, 5m agoPosted 7 years, 5 months ago
Right, if i took a 14 year old to court for stealing a £300 bike, would this offence stay on his record for ever? or be wiped shortly after as he is under 16.

Anyone know?
Nick_ Avatar
7y, 5m agoPosted 7 years, 5 months ago
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suspended#1
Im sure its wiped at 16, you still should though teach him a lesson he wont do it again
#2
wiped at 18,I think,can be taken into account for certain matters
#3
Dont bother not worth it.
#4
Doesn't matter - wrong is wrong - its the only way he'll learn.

Actions = Consequences
banned#5
should it matter? if he stole he needs to learn the consequences.
#6
Also, if he has spray painted the bike, can i get him to refund me? what if he refuses?
#7
i thought even if its just a caution, for jobs in childcare, and care in general - not sure what else it has to be declared or so i thought. Like even when their 50.
#8
Nick_
Also, if he has spray painted the bike, can i get him to refund me? what if he refuses?


Criminal damage
#9
[COLOR="Red"]Yeah, you should take him to court.















And beat him up but wear a mask so he can't identify you.:thumbsup:[/COLOR]
#10
tinkerbell28
Armed forces, police, some civil servants, those that need security clearance etc.


omg thats quite bad then s just for a caution ure pretty much screwed if you're after a job like that.
#11
Years ago my brothers best friend stole a bike from school when he was14 - though it shouldn't have been it stayed attached to his record and when he was in the marines it stopped him going up the career ladder. It may be different today - but once you have a record and i am sure people can find it if they want to.
banned#12
Wiped at 16 or 5 years on record, whatever is the longest, thats what happened to me quite a few years back, when i was 14.
#13
d-j mitch;5600317
Years ago my brothers best friend stole a bike from school when he was14 - though it shouldn't have been it stayed attached to his record and when he was in the marines it stopped him going up the career ladder. It may be different today - but once you have a record and i am sure people can find it if they want to.


My juvenile record never stopped me getting into the military and most certainly didn't stop me going up the ladder.

That was just over 5 years ago I signed up
#14
Nick_
Also, if he has spray painted the bike, can i get him to refund me? what if he refuses?

This gets better :)
#15
i stole from asda at 13 and i hope its wiped!!
#16
Criminal records are never wiped if you go into teaching, even juvenile.
#17
if the kid has never been in trouble before, he would likely get a reprimand or warning which is even less than a caution

he'd have to admit the crime though to be eligible for reprimand or whatever - if he didn't, it'd be court unless cps decided the evidence wasn't there in which case no further action
#18
mbgringo
Doesn't matter - wrong is wrong - its the only way he'll learn.

Actions = Consequences


Spot on,
A lot of people need to start realising that the chioces they make and the actions they do can have an impact upon the rest of their life.
#19
Press charges for theft and criminal damage.
Actions have consequences, it probably won't learn him but at least he will get what's coming to him and hope it will screw him up somewhere in later life. Being young is no excuse.
#20
theres a new thing now in the police well is in west mids and its called local resolutions... and basically its for stuff like this where instead of it all going to court and getting a slap on the wrists and wasting lots of public money and your own time, the two parties can work it out i.e in your case the lad gives bike back etc or gets you new one something like that so you get back hes out of pocket etc....... hope this makes sense its basically making the offender give something back to the victim.. i.e common sense... dont know if its used in other forces yet....
#21
scrumpypaul
if the kid has never been in trouble before, he would likely get a reprimand or warning which is even less than a caution

he'd have to admit the crime though to be eligible for reprimand or whatever - if he didn't, it'd be court unless cps decided the evidence wasn't there in which case no further action


Unless it's a final warning in which case it is declarable on some forms- although they're usually only issued as a last resort xx
#22
Hmm, it's a tough one, afterall, you could ruin this kids whole life for one mistake.

I'd go round and ask for the cost of the repair to the bike, letting him, and his parents know, that if they didn't comply then you will report him to the police. That way, you've game him a chance, and if he refuses, then he probably deserves it.
#23
peodude
Hmm, it's a tough one, afterall, you could ruin this kids whole life for one mistake.

I'd go round and ask for the cost of the repair to the bike, letting him, and his parents know, that if they didn't comply then you will report him to the police. That way, you've game him a chance, and if he refuses, then he probably deserves it.


If its his one and only mistake - he'll get a ticking off - if he's a serial offender he'll be punished as per the rule of the law.

If this is his first foray into "bad boy" - and the OP takes the correct course of action, the caution should set his mind straight to the fact that his wrongdoings can impact his future. Hopefully this, and parental guidance will help him more clearly identify the margins of right and wrong.
#24
peodude
Hmm, it's a tough one, afterall, you could ruin this kids whole life for one mistake.

I'd go round and ask for the cost of the repair to the bike, letting him, and his parents know, that if they didn't comply then you will report him to the police. That way, you've game him a chance, and if he refuses, then he probably deserves it.


Equally, letting him off can ruin his and various other people's lives, by not giving him the message relatively early on in his life that he just can't get away with that sort of thing. If he grows up (or at least, spends the next four years of his life) thinking he can get away with stuff, it doesn't bode well for his future.
#25
Take the little ****er to court - what next, your car ?
banned#26
wiped at 16 :-D my record is virtually empty now :oops:
#27
Could someone answer this though, what would happen if he refused to pay up for damage to the bike ?
1 Like #28
Nick, It depends, however the Police when issuing a caution/reprimand or final warning may ask the teen involved and parents to agree to pay for the damages as part of the the warning. There are some things that have to be done, others are more flexible and down to circumstances and an individual officers/Inspectors discretion.

I have worked in the criminal justice system for the last 9 years, including several years as a Youth Offending Team officer.

Whatever way, it wouldn't be you taking them to court (unless you decided to proceed with civil actions). There are many things that are taken into account before a case gets to court. You can't be responsible for the impact of what a someone's actions have done, and the consequences in their life. At 14, they should have a pretty good idea of what they were doing and the potential consequences, even if they didn't think about it at the time.

As for the record impacting on jobs etc in the future- it's all down to the individual employers, the rules around the job/career and also how the individual comes across.
I've worked with people where it has had every kind of impact- from being given the chance to prove themselves, to losing a job they were doing really well for not declaring their convictions. I think if someone talks responsibly about their past convictions when applying for a job then, they have more of a chance of getting and retaining a job than someone who doesn't declare (when they have to) and hopes to wing it.

The Youth Offending Teams and Probation Service both work very hard with employers and it's certainly not as bleak as it could be for people with criminal records.

For some people involvement with the criminal justice system is enough to get the wake up call around their actions and the way their life is going, others couldn't care less and see it as a one of those things that happens along the way.
#29
it will "expire" so to speak but will be visible on an enhanced CRB check.
#30
Take the dude 2 court I only say this coz I had me gt avalanche knicked after 4 months of riding £600 down the pan so some knob can get a day or so's worth of smack/weed/drink whatever so I say revenge is sweet mate DO IT
#31
It depends on the circumstances with this child whether you would want to involve the police...

If this is your child... don't do it just to teach him a lesson. Why else would you be worried about the long term effects of a criminal record?
#32
Is it the first time he has stolen, or the first time he has been caught?
If he has not yet been arrested by the police, his fingerprints, DNA etc are not on the national database and cannot be put forward for other outstanding jobs.
At 14 he knows the difference between right and wrong (Mens Rea is the latin phrase which describes guilty knowledge or mind)
Be aware though, that if he gets a reprimand or final warning this may not get you any money back.
A conditional caution is for people 18 and over usually, this would have gotten you your money back, potentially, but as he is 14, this is a non starter
Civil court is an option for you. The onus of proof is easier. criminal court is beyond all reasonable doubt whereas civil court is on the balance of probabilities.
There should be a consequence to someones actions, there is to the victim so there should be for the offender
If you contact the police about it or not there will be an impact on someone either way. You are the aggrieved here and should do whatever you think to be the right move for you, not the person responsible.
#33
Will I have a Police Record if I accept a Final Warning?

A record of your final warning will be kept by the police and the youth offending team until you are 18 years old, or for two years after it is given whichever is the longer. This will help them decide any further action if you offend again.
A reprimand or final warning is not a conviction and does not constitute a criminal record. However, police records are held for up to 10 years on young offenders who receive a reprimand or warning.
#34
tinkerbell28
Records are never truly wiped, always declarable for some professions.


the police were never involved tho, i was bjust asked my name and away i went.

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