IMPORTANT - SCAM ALERT - HotUKDeals
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IMPORTANT - SCAM ALERT

kelly_o_fanatic Avatar
8y, 11m agoPosted 8 years, 11 months ago
I know its long, but worth reading. New scam which a lot of people are being taken in by

This one is pretty slick since they provide Y O U with all the information, except the one piece they want.
Note, the callers do not ask for your card number; they already have it. This information is worth reading. By understanding how the VISA & MasterCard Telephone Credit Card Scam works, you'll be better prepared to protect yourself.

One of our employees was called on Wednesday from "VISA", and I was called on Thursday from "MasterCard".

The scam works like this: Person calling says, "This is (name), and I'm calling from the Security and Fraud Department at VISA. My badge number is 12460. Your card has been flagged for an unusual purchase pattern, and I'm calling to verify. This would be on your VISA card which was issued by (name of bank) did you purchase an Anti-Telemarketing Device for £497.99 from a Marketing company based in London ?" When you say "No", the caller continues with, "Then we will be issuing a credit to your account. This is a company we have been watching and the charges range from £297 to £497, just under the £500 purchase pattern that flags most cards. Before your next statement, the credit will be sent to (gives you your address), is that correct?"

You say "yes". The caller continues - "I will be starting a fraud investigation. If you have any questions, you should call the 0800 number listed on the back of your card (0800-VISA) and ask for Security.

You will need to refer to this Control Number. The caller then gives you a 6 digit number. "Do you need me to read it again?"

Here's the IMPORTANT part on how the scam works the caller then says, "I need to verify you are in possession of your card." He'll ask you to "turn your card over and look for some numbers." There are 7 numbers; the first 4 are part of your card number, the next 3 are the security numbers that verify you are the possessor of the card. These are the numbers you sometimes use to make Internet purchases to prove you have the card. The caller will ask you to read the 3 numbers to him. After you tell the caller the 3 numbers, he'll say, "That is correct, I just needed to verify that the card has not been lost or stolen, and that you still have your card. Do you have any other questions?" After you say, "No," the caller then thanks you and states, "Don't hesitate to call back if you do", and hangs up.

You actually say very little, and they never ask for or tell you the Card number. But after we were called on Wednesday, we called back within 20 minutes to ask a question. Are we glad we did! The REAL VISA Security Department told us it was a scam and in the last 15 minutes a new purchase of £497.99 was charged to our card.

Long story - short - we made a real fraud report and closed the VISA account. VISA is reissuing us a new number. What the scammers want is the 3-digit PIN number on the back of the card. Don't give it to them. Instead, tell them you'll call VISA or MasterCard directly for verification of their conversation. The real VISA told us that they will never ask for anything on the card as they already know the information since they issued the card! If you give the scammers your 3 Digit PIN Number, you think you're receiving a credit. However, by the time you get your statement you'll see charges for purchases you didn't make, and by then it's almost too late and/or more difficult to actually file a fraud report.

What makes this more remarkable is that on Thursday, I got a call from a "Jason Richardson of MasterCard" with a word-for-word repeat of the VISA scam. This time I didn't let him finish. I hung up! We filed a police report, as instructed by VISA. The police said they are taking several of these reports daily! They also urged us to tell everybody we know that this scam is happening .

Please pass this on to all your family and friends. By informing each other, we protect each other.
kelly_o_fanatic Avatar
8y, 11m agoPosted 8 years, 11 months ago
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(27) Jump to unreadPost a comment
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[admin]#1
Thanks kelly_o_fanatic - this kind of social engineering can catch out even careful people!
#3
yes thanks bud will watch out for this one
#4
Thanks Julia, a very useful post :thumbsup:
#5
thanks for this , I'll tell family & friends about this one
#6
I like the way that this urban legend is word for word identical to the 2003 one mentioned except the change of sign from $ to £ ;-)
#7
wow such a believable phone call,
scary really to think they give you all your details
only asking for verification, which you'd expect, of some kind
I'd think a lot of people will get caught out with this one

thank you for the warning, appreciated
[admin]#8
I like the way that this urban legend is word for word identical to the 2003 one mentioned except the change of sign from $ to £ ;-)
Did you miss the part on Snopes that said it wasn't an urban legend? kelly_o_fanatic got the call herself also which isn't how urban legends work (it's always a friend or something you heard).

It's good to be cynical towards warnings but also good to be extra cynical towards anyone who asks for financial details over the phone.

EDIT: sorry re-reading it and I see it may be a copy/paste from kelly_o_fanatic. Might be good to say that explicitly kelly_o_fanatic as I would tend to be a bit more cynical myself also if this was just an email forward. i.e. good to warn people about possible stuff but this isn't necessarily true.
banned#9
this is an urban myth!

just like the one where ppl were gettinng £1000s of phone bills by pressing buttons in response to a auto call- yeah right!
#10
rain
wow such a believable phone call,
scary really to think they give you all your details
only asking for verification, which you'd expect, of some kind
I'd think a lot of people will get caught out with this one

thank you for the warning, appreciated


They should ask for verification such as name/address/mothers maiden name/recent purchase etc, not bank details. We had a call from halifax about card being used suspiciously, the only info they asked for was name and mothers maiden name and then later a recent purchase made- they asked if card numbers were correct but it was them who said it. We didnt believe the call at first since it came at 8pm, but they didnt ask for any details and were able to give us the details. (Card details had been used, but only for £2 worth of stuff, halifax replaced the card)
[Holiday Pirates]#11
I had this one in an email about 12 months ago, nice to be reminded though!
#12
Admin
Did you miss the part on Snopes that said it wasn't an urban legend? kelly_o_fanatic got the call herself also which isn't how urban legends work (it's always a friend or something you heard).

It's good to be cynical towards warnings but also good to be extra cynical towards anyone who asks for financial details over the phone.

EDIT: sorry re-reading it and I see it may be a copy/paste from kelly_o_fanatic. Might be good to say that explicitly kelly_o_fanatic as I would tend to be a bit more cynical myself also if this was just an email forward. i.e. good to warn people about possible stuff but this isn't necessarily true.


Sorry, didnt realise people would assume I had been called. However this was sent to dad by his employer (vertex) who have sent it to all employees. There are no other 'forwarded' messages on the email so looks pretty new. They seem to think it is pretty important to email it to ALL employees....
#13
Admin
Did you miss the part on Snopes that said it wasn't an urban legend? kelly_o_fanatic got the call herself also which isn't how urban legends work (it's always a friend or something you heard).

It's good to be cynical towards warnings but also good to be extra cynical towards anyone who asks for financial details over the phone.

EDIT: sorry re-reading it and I see it may be a copy/paste from kelly_o_fanatic. Might be good to say that explicitly kelly_o_fanatic as I would tend to be a bit more cynical myself also if this was just an email forward. i.e. good to warn people about possible stuff but this isn't necessarily true.


http://www.hoax-slayer.com/card-security-code-scam.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mbouch/F2322276?thread=4867777

http://urbanlegends.about.com/library/bl_credit_card_fraud.htm

http://www.nfbnet.org/pipermail/nfbofnc/2004-November/000265.html

Just 4 of the different site this is printed word for word. It's on hundreds of sites, she has been busy :)

Good advice but urban legend all the same.
banned#14
this thread should be deleted!
#15
ROKO
this is an urban myth!

just like the one where ppl were gettinng £1000s of phone bills by pressing buttons in response to a auto call- yeah right!


anthony712
I like the way that this urban legend is word for word identical to the 2003 one mentioned except the change of sign from $ to £ ;-)




Whether or not this is an urban legend, it doesnt hurt to be cautious. If this stops someone being scammed then great, if it doesnt then what has been wasted? A minute of your time.
[admin]#16
My thought kelly_o_fanatic is that it would be best first of all to clarify that it's a copy/paste. When I first scanned through I assumed the "I" in the story was you which made it much more important.

Yes you are right we should warn each other however my concern would be that soon we can end up with load of warnings about possibilities rather than threads about what has actually happened to people. As you can understand I'm sure it is the latter type which is most important and I'd hate to see a real problem ignored simply because everyone has tuned out due to warnings of hypothetical possibilities.

p.s. I should say also that don't take this as a criticism of your intentions! your heart and intention is certainly in the right place.
#17
kelly_o_fanatic
Whether or not this is an urban legend, it doesnt hurt to be cautious. If this stops someone being scammed then great, if it doesnt then what has been wasted? A minute of your time.


Please be sure to post a thread about looking left and right when crossing the road, or about hiding my pin number when I use my card in a store.

Surely a little research before posting wouldn't be too much to ask? maybe you could do a post about that?

I'm joking, ok? :thumbsup:
1 Like #18
Title should not read "scam Alert"
It should read [COLOR="Red"]"SPAM ALERT" [/COLOR]
[helper]#19
I'm always highly suspicious of any email that says "tell all your family and friends" and this email was posted on here about a month ago. I usually use hoaxslayer or snopes (mentioned previously) to check them out.

However it did contain a useful warning (I hadn't come across that one before) and as Admin says Kelly's intentions were in the right place.....
#20
Well I personally don't think you can get enough warnings about scams and i don't give a monkey's where they come from and whether they're urban legend or fact or even part fiction.

Anything that makes people sit up and think a little instead of assuming all is well has got to be good in my book.
Most scams are only variations on a theme anyway so even if the whole warning is false parts of it may serve to ring a few bells and help stop people from falling into traps.

Think yourself lucky that there are still some people out there who are still prepared to try and help rather than sit back and do nothing but gloat and flame when scamming occurs.

Thanks kelly :)
#21
Even if this is a legend I get about ten bank phishing emails a day now, most from banks I don't even have an account with.

Had £100 stolen from my account a few months back, my Dad had a couple of grand spent at Tesco Direct he knew nothing about and my Auntie had card details used by someone in Italy recently. Scammers find a way, it's just lucky my family keeps a close eye on our accounts.
1 Like #22
kelly_o_fanatic
They should ask for verification such as name/address/mothers maiden name/recent purchase etc, not bank details. We had a call from halifax about card being used suspiciously, the only info they asked for was name and mothers maiden name and then later a recent purchase made- they asked if card numbers were correct but it was them who said it. We didnt believe the call at first since it came at 8pm, but they didnt ask for any details and were able to give us the details. (Card details had been used, but only for £2 worth of stuff, halifax replaced the card)


To be honest, if I had a call from 'my bank' or whoever I won't even give them the steam off my **** let alone ANY information. I had a call like that before, they asked if I was Mr X, so I said yes, they said can you confirm your date of birth and I said NO. They asked why not and I told them straight, I haven't got a clue who the **** you are, you rang me, I didn't ring you. Therefore I DON'T have to prove who I am, it's your job to prove who YOU are. And as you obviously won't be able to, you can **** right off. Then I hung up the phone.

Never did find out of it was actually my bank calling, but as there were no repurcussions, I guess not :lol:
#23
Shengis
To be honest, if I had a call from 'my bank' or whoever I won't even give them the steam off my **** let alone ANY information. I had a call like that before, they asked if I was Mr X, so I said yes, they said can you confirm your date of birth and I said NO. They asked why not and I told them straight, I haven't got a clue who the **** you are, you rang me, I didn't ring you. Therefore I DON'T have to prove who I am, it's your job to prove who YOU are. And as you obviously won't be able to, you can **** right off. Then I hung up the phone.

Never did find out of it was actually my bank calling, but as there were no repurcussions, I guess not :lol:


I usually ask a series of security questions when I am called by someone official, I have most of these to hand but prefer to place the caller on hold for a minute or two while I put the kettle on and sit down.
#24
Shengis
To be honest, if I had a call from 'my bank' or whoever I won't even give them the steam off my **** let alone ANY information. I had a call like that before, they asked if I was Mr X, so I said yes, they said can you confirm your date of birth and I said NO. They asked why not and I told them straight, I haven't got a clue who the **** you are, you rang me, I didn't ring you. Therefore I DON'T have to prove who I am, it's your job to prove who YOU are. And as you obviously won't be able to, you can **** right off. Then I hung up the phone.

Never did find out of it was actually my bank calling, but as there were no repurcussions, I guess not :lol:


And that is the best policy. Never answer any questions on the phone if someones called you. If you live by that simple rule you'll save yourself grief at some stage.
(Also has it's bonuses if it's those pesky relatives)

Banks themselves are one of the worst offenders, phoning to try and sell you some sort of insurance or whatever when they themselves advise not to give out persona details on the phone. HYPOCRITES !
#25
the last 3 numbers on the back of your card aren't that top secret. any shop assistant handling your card can see them.
#26
ROKO
this is an urban myth!

just like the one where ppl were gettinng £1000s of phone bills by pressing buttons in response to a auto call- yeah right!


Not entirely nonsense, there were pabx systems where you could do this however in general it is an urban legend as it doesn't work on most phones (home phones/mobiles) and even on pabx systems the code varies and most companies have the sense to disable it.

John
#27
hottoshop;1425954
And that is the best policy. Never answer any questions on the phone if someones called you. If you live by that simple rule you'll save yourself grief at some stage.
(Also has it's bonuses if it's those pesky relatives)

Banks themselves are one of the worst offenders, phoning to try and sell you some sort of insurance or whatever when they themselves advise not to give out persona details on the phone. HYPOCRITES !

I've had the same exdirectory phone number for 26 years and guess who regulary calls me to try and sell me services?
yep BT:whistling:

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