Is there a law that states if its to hot in the office we can go home! - HotUKDeals
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Is there a law that states if its to hot in the office we can go home!

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I'm at work at the moment and i just cant do any work cause its tooooo hot, And I'm trying to find a way to get out this place and enjoy the weather before we get our typical english weather... Read More
Abz Avatar
8y, 10m agoPosted 8 years, 10 months ago
I'm at work at the moment and i just cant do any work cause its tooooo hot, And I'm trying to find a way to get out this place and enjoy the weather before we get our typical english weather...
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Abz Avatar
8y, 10m agoPosted 8 years, 10 months ago
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#1
yes there is. health and safety at work - i think temperature has to be below 26 degrees celcius or something like that
#2
Im sure people were talking about this before, we were told at work that companies have to make provisions to make their staff comfortable, if for example the air conditioning is broken and you are totally roasting then you are entitled to extra rest breaks.

Dunno how true that is..
#3
[SIZE=2]Is there a maximum temperature to which workers can be exposed at work?[/SIZE]

Actually, no. In legislation, there is no single value for the maximum temperature to which you can be exposed at work, nor is there a single value above which work should stop. Of course, some temperature and relative humidity combinations cause discomfort. However, in some situations, exposure to excessive heat can lead to heat stress that could lead to heat exhaustion, fainting, heat stroke, and other conditions which should be addressed.
[SIZE=2]Why is there no maximum temperature?[/SIZE]

Occupational exposure limits or guidelines for exposure to high temperatures actually depend on a number of factors, not just the temperature. These other factors include:
[LIST]
[*]relative humidity
[*]exposure to sun or other heat sources
[*]amount of air movement
[*]work demands ­ i.e. how physically demanding the work is
[*]is the worker acclimatized or unacclimatized to the work load under the conditions of work
[*]what clothing is worn (including protective clothing)
[*]what is the work-rest regimen (% time work vs. % time rest break).
[*].
[*].
[*].
[*][/LIST]http://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/phys_agents/max_temp.html
#4
http://www.hse.gov.uk/contact/faqs/temperature.htm

"
Where a reasonably comfortable temperature cannot be achieved throughout a workroom, local cooling should be provided. In extremely hot weather fans and increased ventilation may be used instead of local cooling.
Where, despite the provision of local cooling, workers are exposed to temperatures which do not give reasonable comfort, suitable protective clothing and rest facilities should be provided. Where practical there should be systems of work (for example, task rotation) to ensure that the length of time for which individual workers are exposed to uncomfortable temperatures is limited."
#5
Canada?

snowtiger;2620096
[SIZE=2]Is there a maximum temperature to which workers can be exposed at work?[/SIZE]

Actually, no. In legislation, there is no single value for the maximum temperature to which you can be exposed at work, nor is there a single value above which work should stop. Of course, some temperature and relative humidity combinations cause discomfort. However, in some situations, exposure to excessive heat can lead to heat stress that could lead to heat exhaustion, fainting, heat stroke, and other conditions which should be addressed.
[SIZE=2]Why is there no maximum temperature?[/SIZE]

Occupational exposure limits or guidelines for exposure to high temperatures actually depend on a number of factors, not just the temperature. These other factors include:[LIST]
[*]relative humidity
[*]exposure to sun or other heat sources
[*]amount of air movement
[*]work demands * i.e. how physically demanding the work is
[*]is the worker acclimatized or unacclimatized to the work load under the conditions of work
[*]what clothing is worn (including protective clothing)
[*]what is the work-rest regimen (% time work vs. % time rest break).
[*].
[*].
[*].[/LIST]http://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/phys_agents/max_temp.html
#6
I used to be a machinist and there was a huge thermometer on the wall to make sure temperature was comfortable. It's in their best interests as workers are then more productive.
#7
The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 lay down particular requirements for most aspects of the working environment
Regulation 7 of these Regulations deals specifically with the temperature in indoor workplaces and states that:
[INDENT] During working hours, the temperature in all workplaces inside buildings shall be reasonable.
[/INDENT] However, the application of the regulation depends on the nature of the workplace i.e. a bakery, a cold store, an office, a warehouse.
The associated ACOP goes on to explain:
[INDENT] ‘The temperature in workrooms should provide reasonable comfort without the need for special clothing. Where such a temperature is impractical because of hot or cold processes, all reasonable steps should be taken to achieve a temperature which is as close as possible to comfortable. 'Workroom' means a room where people normally work for more than short periods.
The temperature in workrooms should normally be at least 16 degrees Celsius unless much of the work involves severe physical effort in which case the temperature should be at least 13 degrees Celsius. These temperatures may not, however, ensure reasonable comfort, depending on other factors such as air movement and relative humidity.’
[/INDENT] Where the temperature in a workroom would otherwise be uncomfortably high, for example because of hot processes or the design of the building, all reasonable steps should be taken to achieve a reasonably comfortable temperature, for example by:
[LIST]
[*] insulating hot plants or pipes;
[*]providing air-cooling plant;
[*]shading windows;
[*]siting workstations away from places subject to radiant heat.[/LIST] Where a reasonably comfortable temperature cannot be achieved throughout a workroom, local cooling should be provided. In extremely hot weather fans and increased ventilation may be used instead of local cooling.
Where, despite the provision of local cooling, workers are exposed to temperatures which do not give reasonable comfort, suitable protective clothing and rest facilities should be provided. Where practical there should be systems of work (for example, task rotation) to ensure that the length of time for which individual workers are exposed to uncomfortable temperatures is limited.
#8
Titchimp;2620108
Canada?

Yes sorry this is for Canada ! :oops: lol (heats fault!) :p
1 Like #9
its just badly hot in this office today, But the women dont feel too hot cause they've got their skirts on with a light top/t-shirt....

Me and my colleague were saying can you imagine what would happen to us if we came in shorts and a tank top one day....instead we're stuck wearing trouser shirt and a tie :(.....where's the equal opportunities :whistling:
#10
snowtiger
Yes sorry this is for Canada ! :oops: lol (heats fault!) :p


well atleast in canada everywhere has AC
#11
my dads a cook so imagine his heat he doesnt complain 1 bit lol
banned#12
HSE previously defined thermal comfort in the workplace, as: 'An acceptable zone of thermal comfort for most people in the UK lies roughly between 13°C (56°F) and 30°C (86°F), with acceptable temperatures for more strenuous work activities concentrated towards the bottom end of the range, and more sedentary activities towards the higher end.'
How hot does it have to be before I can complain?

Refer to the table in Step 1 of the Five steps to risk assessment. If the percentage of workers complaining about thermal discomfort exceeds the recommended figure, your employer should carry out a risk assessment, and act on the results of that assessment.
banned#14
If you are experiencing thermal discomfort your employer is obliged to carry out a risk assessment. :roll:

Gee thats gonna help :)
#15
its a morality thing at 30 degrees work are meant to make you comfortable which could mean 5 mins extra break or giving u a cold drink which could just be water
banned#16
stuntman9883
its a morality thing at 30 degrees work are meant to make you comfortable which could mean 5 mins extra break or giving u a cold drink which could just be water


Yeah its pathetic though isn't it, what a cop out
#17
Fake a feint, tha\t should wory em ;)
#18
I wish on the way out to the Gulf I was bosuns mate in Malta that was 50+ C then in Bahrain and Dubai it was pretty hot too 40-50 C, they just made sure we had plenty of water available
banned#19
LadyMadonna;2620115
I used to be a machinist and there was a huge thermometer on the wall to make sure temperature was comfortable. It's in their best interests as workers are then more productive.

How did a 'huge thermometer" on the wall make sure the temperature was comfortable? :w00t:
#20
csiman
How did a 'huge thermometer" on the wall make sure the temperature was comfortable? :w00t:


:w00t: I'm sure I don't actually have to answer that one.

I'm sure a csiman could work it out for himself. ;-)

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