Keeping Hens As Pets - HotUKDeals
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Keeping Hens As Pets

MinstrelMan Avatar
8y, 6m agoPosted 8 years, 6 months ago
No, this is not the most random thing I could think of, I'm actually serious!

If anyone saw the one show last night will have seen a story about how this lady is rescuing battery hens thet have outlived their life as egg layers (as they no longer lay one per day)

This missus then turns to me and says can we have a pet hen? FFS!

We have ample room in the garden and it's a better pet than a cat for our little one, just wondering if anyone else has experience in keeping hens, I must admit I do like the idea of cooking using my own free range eggs and helping a bird thats been in lock up most of it's life (not the austrian type though) but what are downsides/ things to take into consideration? I'll be lookin up various websites but just wondered if anyone knew on here.

Next thread.... names, I think colonel and sanders is pretty heartless :lol:
MinstrelMan Avatar
8y, 6m agoPosted 8 years, 6 months ago
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banned#1
theres a thread on here by a member who has just got chickens, will see if i can find it for you


here ya go

http://www.hotukdeals.com/item/154963/chickens/
#2
Cheers sassie, thats top stuff!.
#3
I used to have hens at my parents house. It was fun to collect the eggs and they terrified the cat!

Make sure you haven't got any gaps in the hedge or holes anywhere - they'll go next door!

When you pick them up do it very quickly and hold them tight - chickens can't fly and if they struggle then you might drop and injure them. Make sure you lock them away every night - the reason we don't have them anymore is that our friends were supposed to put them away while we were on holiday and the first night the foxes got the all :(

Great for your kid...
#4
If you dont keep hens caged up then you will find a few gone each morning.

Foxes LOVE eating Chicken.

You will need an area securely fenced in to keep out foxes, and if you have a lot of hens that could get expensive.
#5
guilbert53

Foxes LOVE eating Chicken.


I LOVE eating Chicken... better watch out or I'll be in ur garden like the colonel!!!
#6
My mum has always wanted to own chickens etc, but our garden is too narrow to! :( shame!
#7
yeh best watch out for foxes and badgers!! nasty things they are
#8
[CENTER]http://www.bbc.co.uk/jersey/content/images/2005/11/24/happy_hens_ecard_350x350.jpg
This time next year .... ![/CENTER]
1 Like #9
[SIZE=6]Then...[/SIZE]

[SIZE=5]Provencal Chicken with thyme and honey sauce[/SIZE]

http://img.foodnetwork.com/FOOD/2003/10/20/provencal_roasted_chicken_e.jpghttp://www.foodnetwork.com/food/images/spacers/spacer.gifhttp://www.foodnetwork.com/food/images/spacers/spacer.gif

1 (3 to 4-pound) chicken, excess fat trimmed and giblets removed
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 shallot, sliced
1 bunch fresh thyme
1 lemon, zested in large strips
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon honey
Sauce:
3 tablespoons water
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon honey
2 tablespoons minced shallot
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper
Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
For the chicken: Season the chicken cavity with salt and pepper, to taste. Stuff the chicken cavity with the shallot, half the thyme, and lemon zest. Set a v-rack or regular rack in a roasting pan, and brush chicken with a bit of the olive oil. Whisk the honey and remaining oil in a small bowl. Dip the remaining thyme in the mixture and use it to brush the chicken all over with the honey mixture. Season bird with salt and pepper, to taste. Tuck the wings under the back, cross the legs, and tie them with kitchen string. Place the chicken breast side down on the rack and roast until the back is golden brown, about 35 to 40 minutes. Remove the pan from the oven and turn the chicken breast side up. Cut the string where it holds the legs together and open up the legs a bit. Baste the chicken with the pan drippings, using the thyme sprigs as a brush. Roast the chicken again until the breast is golden brown and a meat thermometer inserted in the thigh registers 170 degrees F., 20 to 25 minutes more. Transfer the chicken to a carving board, and let it rest 10 minutes before carving.

For the sauce: Remove the rack from the roasting pan. Put the pan over medium-high heat, add the water, and stir with a wooden spoon to release the brown bits that cling to the pan. Strain the pan drippings into a small bowl and spoon off the fat. Whisk in the lemon juice, olive oil, honey, shallot, thyme, salt, and pepper to taste.

Carve the chicken and serve drizzled with the sauce.

[SIZE=6]Enjoy![/SIZE]
#10
sassie
theres a thread on here by a member who has just got chickens, will see if i can find it for you


here ya go

http://www.hotukdeals.com/item/154963/chickens/


That would be me :)

Minstrel, agree with her and get some hens!
You'll be doing a lot of good for them as well as yourselves!

Free eggs! And they taste like eggs! Not the supermarket where you would get them from...we're currently get 6 per day from 8 hens!

They are easy to keep! they put themselves to bed, you just got to lock up after them...

When picking them up, be firm, put your hands over the wings, grab the side of the body and pick them up. That will stop them flapping around...

Any questions, feel free to get in touch!
#11
cannyscot, if you done that it wouldn't taste as nice...if you're keeping hens, there will be no white meat...its all brown. Think of leg meat!

Reason for this is because in the farms, they have no exercise so the muscles aren't used much, hence why they are white, If you're keeping them as pets and let them have free roam, the get loads of exercise so the muscles get used, resulting in brown meat!
#12
birdyboyuk
cannyscot, if you done that it wouldn't taste as nice...if you're keeping hens, there will be no white meat...its all brown. Think of leg meat!

Reason for this is because in the farms, they have no exercise so the muscles aren't used much, hence why they are white, If you're keeping them as pets and let them have free roam, the get loads of exercise so the muscles get used, resulting in brown meat!


Meat is meat... licks lips :P (no homo)
#13
I saw that, it was on 'the one show'. Really upsetting conditions
#14
A farm i used to live on had some rescued ,ex battery hens they are "eating machines" and we found one eating a chick from one of the normal hens, things like that could be a bit traumatic for kids, so don't get a cockerel.
#15
it's a better pet than a cat for our little one,

I'm not at all sure about this and I disagree with gileswendes.
I don't think that they are good 'pets' usually. No doubt some people have special memories of 'furry fuzzy chicks' - rag and bone men used to give them to you , back in the day, but generally hens are pretty self-centred, a bit pecky ( and sometimes very pecky if they want to sit on their eggs), feathery and dusty, eat anything and are hens. Great as hens and for kids to learn about caring for animals and 'food'. Don't know if birdyboy would disagree?? Perhaps battery hens are a bit less feisty than those that have always been free-range.

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