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Kinect Technical Specifications made public (comparison to PlayStation Move & Wii Remote controllers)

fanpages Avatar
6y, 5m agoPosted 6 years, 5 months ago
As quoted on the Play.com product page for "Kinect: Xbox 360"

[ http://www.play.com/Games/Xbox360/4-/10296372/Project-Natal/Product.html ]

Special Features

* Control your Xbox 360 with a single gesture or wave of the hand
* Get off the sofa and into the game by using your body as the controller
* Connect with friends and family with easy and interactive gameplay, video chat and more (requires Xbox LIVE Gold membership)
* Revolutionary technology that includes body recognition.
* Works alongside your Xbox 360 controller to enhance your entertainment
* Works with every Xbox 360 (Requires 175MB of memory)

* What's in the Box?
* Sensor
* Power Supply Cable
* Kinect game
* Manual
* Wi-Fi Extension Cable

* What you need to use the sensor:
* Xbox 360 console
* Kinect Ready games
* You!



Technical Details

Minimum Requirements

Sensor
Colour and depth-sensing lenses
Voice microphone array
Tilt motor for sensor adjustment
Fully compatible with existing Xbox 360 consoles

Field of View
Horizontal field of view: 57 degrees
Vertical field of view: 43 degrees
Physical tilt range: ± 27 degrees
Depth sensor range: 1.2m - 3.5m

Data Streams
320x240 16-bit depth @ 30 frames/sec * Note: below
640x480 32-bit colour@ 30 frames/sec * Note: below
16-bit audio @ 16 kHz

Skeletal Tracking System
Tracks up to 6 people, including 2 active players
Tracks 20 joints per active player
Ability to map active players to LIVE Avatars

Audio System
LIVE party chat and in-game voice chat (requires Xbox LIVE Gold Membership)
Echo cancellation system enhances voice input
Speech recognition in multiple

This information is based on specifications supplied by manufacturers and should be used for guidance only.

---

* Note:

At a frame rate of 30 Hz the RGB video stream is at 32-bit colo[u]r "VGA" [Video Graphics Array] resolution (640x480 pixels).

The monochrome video stream is for depth-sensing at 16-bit colo[u]r "QVGA" [Quarter Video Graphics Array] resolution. That is 320x240 pixels with 65,536 levels of sensitivity.
fanpages Avatar
6y, 5m agoPosted 6 years, 5 months ago
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#1
Note: "Tracks up to 6 people, including 2 active players"

Not quite the family-fun portrayed in the promotional video(s)!

[ http://www.gametrailers.com/video/e3-09-project-natal/50017 ]
[ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fdj1hDzIHFM ]
[ http://www.youtube.com/watch#!v=CgXHIuFGero ]

BFN,

fp.
#2
well the videos only show more than two active players in a game on the quiz game but thats only hand movements so thats prob why, the dance game is actually one player just others can dance along if they want lol and well for the ball one it does show only 2 avatars on screen the parent are just trying to get the kids to move around to try to promote it as family fun which was quite a fail.
#3
sweeten16
well the videos only show more than two active players in a game on the quiz game but thats only hand movements so thats prob why, the dance game is actually one player just others can dance along if they want lol and well for the ball one it does show only 2 avatars on screen the parent are just trying to get the kids to move around to try to promote it as family fun which was quite a fail.


Only a maximum of two active players at any one time is going to limit the appeal of Kinect especially if marketed towards a family. The Wii console that, arguably, is being used as a baseline for motion controller input to a video games environment, supports more than two players.

I wonder if Microsoft chose today to release this information in an attempt to hide it amongst the flak (read: "mixed feedback") Sony are receiving about PlayStation Plus.

BFN,

fp.
banned#4
I don't get why it would track 6 but only 2 can be active, seems to go against everything they said about it.
If that's the final specs i can see that putting a few people off.
I know the PS3 can have 7 DS3's connected, is it the same for Move?
#5
sennasnit
I don't get why it would track 6 but only 2 can be active, seems to go against everything they said about it.
If that's the final specs i can see that putting a few people off.
I know the PS3 can have 7 DS3's connected, is it the same for Move?


Doing a little bit of research, there are similar limitations to the Sony motion controller offering if the details quoted within an article at Gizmodo.com (on 11 March 2010) are still true:

PlayStation Move Gimps 4-Player Support
---
Sony has just confirmed with us that PlayStation Move cannot support 4 players in its full configuration.

The complete experience of PlayStation Move requires two controllers per person, either two PlayStation Move wands or one wand and one sub (nunchuk-like) controller.

In a four-player game, that arrangement would equate to eight total controllers. But there's a problem that arose when we were pricing the Move peripherals. The PlayStation 3's Bluetooth support is limited to only seven connections. That would put Sony one controller short. Sports Champions, for instance, is a PS3 title in which you can wield a motion-controlled sword and shield. In a theoretical four-person configuration, such wouldn't be possible with fewer than eight connections.

So we contacted the company, and they clarified:

"Four PlayStation Move controllers can connect to a PS3 at one time (or two PlayStation Move Controllers and 2 PlayStation Move sub-controllers)."

So the total is actually quite a bit less than seven.

Does this mean that four players can't enjoy PlayStation Move titles at once? Absolutely not. Each player could use a single Move controller, much like some Wii titles need only the Wiimote. However, it does mean that designers are severely limited in what they can offer.

The good news is, absolutely none of this is confusing at all.

---

So, in summary:

Up to four PlayStation Move controllers can be used concurrently; four PlayStation Move Motion Controllers, or two Move Motion Controllers & two Move Navigation Controllers.

Presumably other players can use SIXAXIS or DUALSHOCK 3 controllers at the same time if a specific title supports many (more) players.

BFN,

fp.
#6
They should just hook a connector in like the wiimote does with the nunchuck. Or go wireless with it like the wireless nunchucks. You'd only need 4 bluetooth connections then.


Kinect doesn't look as good as it did initially. Only 2 players isn't good although you can see why it would be difficult to track more.

30fps is a real let down though. You're not going to get very fluid motion with that! I think Sony's tracks at 60fps?
banned#7
Benjimoron
They should just hook a connector in like the wiimote does with the nunchuck. Or go wireless with it like the wireless nunchucks. You'd only need 4 bluetooth connections then.


Kinect doesn't look as good as it did initially. Only 2 players isn't good although you can see why it would be difficult to track more.

30fps is a real let down though. You're not going to get very fluid motion with that! I think Sony's tracks at 60fps?


No, I think the eye only does 30fps, but it's a different kind of motion control.
I think fp could clear that up.
Well it's 30 fps when you do stop motion videos with it.
Here's my Playdoh effort!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h45Tvt8VO_0
:thumbsup::oops:
#8
Benjimoron
They should just hook a connector in like the wiimote does with the nunchuck. Or go wireless with it like the wireless nunchucks. You'd only need 4 bluetooth connections then.


Kinect doesn't look as good as it did initially. Only 2 players isn't good although you can see why it would be difficult to track more.

30fps is a real let down though. You're not going to get very fluid motion with that! I think Sony's tracks at 60fps?


Yes, that is correct; a rate of 60 Hertz at 640×480 pixel resolution or it can also capture at 120 Hertz using 320×240 pixels.

The Wii Remote uses an internal ("ADXL330") accelerometer capable of sensing three individual axes & ("PixArt") optical sensor technology for communication with the Wii "sensor bar" (containing ten infrared Light-Emitting Diodes; five at each end of the bar). Movement can be detected up to 5 metres away by the use of "triangulating" light sources from the two sets of light clusters & the image sensor within the controller.

Height & Distance are calculated by the same method & rotation is controlled by the accelerometer acting as a tilt sensor.

Due to the use of infrared the system can be subject to interference from other infrared sources in the same environment.

PlayStation Move relies upon the PlayStation Eye camera to track the wand's position along a multitude of planes (or, rather tracks the illuminated "orb" on the top of the controllers containing RGB Light-Emitting Diodes), & two inertial sensors (a three-axis linear accelerometer & a three-axis angular rate sensor) to detect motion & rotation when the controller is not in direct line-of-sight of the PlayStation Eye (known as "dead reckoning").

The distance of the controller from the PlayStation Eye is determined by the fact that the size of the spherical "orb" is known so the detected image of the light source can be used to gauge distance accurately (& with high precision; at the most to within one or two centimetres in the Z-axis, & to within a few millimetres in the X-Y plane) in three dimensions. A magnetometer is also included that can be used to calibrate the controller's orientation with respect to the Earth's magnetic field. This helps to make corrections against drift (cumulative error) of the inertial sensors.

The response time for the motion control system has been quoted (by Mark D Green, a senior designer for Sony Computer Entertainment Europe) as being around 22 milliseconds!

See: "PlayStation 3 News Articles: - PlayStation Move games interview" (UK.PlayStation.com)

The motion controller also incorporates haptic (tactile feedback) technology for vibration("rumble")-based feedback.

If you recall the PlayStation 2 (PS2) console has a PlayStation EyeToy device (similar to the technology deployed with the Kinect product) that is essentially just a "webcam" like you will find used on PC platforms.


As mentioned above, the PlayStation Eye (PS3) can capture frames up to a rate of 60 Hertz at 640×480 pixel resolution. It can also capture at 120 Hertz using 320×240 pixels.

Sony quote that this is "two times the frame-rate", "four times the resolution", & "two times the sensitivity" of the "EyeToy".

The sensor chip design using larger sensor pixels is courtesy of OmniVision Technologies offering more effective low-light operation.

The device has an adjustable (two manual setting) fixed focus zoom lens giving a 56 degree field of view (comparable with the "EyeToy") for "close-up framing" (such as chat applications or the "EyePet" application), or a 75 degree field of view for "long shot framing" (used in interactive gaming applications).

The "four capsule" microphone array offers multi-directional voice location tracking, as well as background noise suppression & echo cancellation processing each channel with 16-bit samples & a sampling rate of 48 kilohertz. It has a signal-to-noise ratio of 90 decibels.

The PlayStation Eye can output video to the console in an uncompressed form (with "no compression artefacts"; no discarding of data that may be too complex for the data rate). It also supports (Motion) JPEG ("Joint Photographic Experts Group") compression (where video frames are converted to a sequence of images).

BFN,

fp.
#9
Awesome!

I think you mention that the wiimote uses the infrared to detect motion? As far as I was aware it only uses the infrared sensor bar to enable pointing/aiming etc. My parents always aim the remote at the tv for bowling and then blame the sensor bar for not working properly. I assume I'm right to say that it doesn't even use the sensor bar for the "game", you can bowl away from the tv if you want?
banned#10
here's a Kinect video from youtube taken at one of the demo pods at Microsoft stores in the US.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=210dcx2bA3g
I think they've got a lot to sort out
#11
You CAN play 6 players.

Only 4 of them have to be dead and not moving.
#12
Benjimoron
Awesome!

I think you mention that the wiimote uses the infrared to detect motion? As far as I was aware it only uses the infrared sensor bar to enable pointing/aiming etc. My parents always aim the remote at the tv for bowling and then blame the sensor bar for not working properly. I assume I'm right to say that it doesn't even use the sensor bar for the "game", you can bowl away from the tv if you want?


Yes you may as long as the Wii remote control is within the required range of operation whilst you do. Obviously ensure that you inform the Wii console configuration settings whether the bar is positioned above or below your TV (so that the triangulation height offsets the movement vertically).

Instead of bowling towards the sensor bar, have you tried letting go of the ball behind you (as if you are throwing it away from the sensor bar/TV)? If not, give it a go & watch the reaction on-screen when you do :)

BFN,

fp.
#13
splatsplatsplat
You CAN play 6 players.

Only 4 of them have to be dead and not moving.


The concurrent usage of more than two players is the issue.

I am sure I am not alone in thinking that more than two players were supported at the same time.

It was not apparent from the game-play video footage shown at the recent Electronic Entertainment Expo [E3] trade show, for instance.

BFN,

fp.
#14
fanpages
Yes you may as long as the Wii remote control is within the required range of operation whilst you do. Obviously ensure that you inform the Wii console configuration settings whether the bar is positioned above or below your TV (so that the triangulation height offsets the movement vertically).

Instead of bowling towards the sensor bar, have you tried letting go of the ball behind you (as if you are throwing it away from the sensor bar/TV)? If not, give it a go & watch the reaction on-screen when you do :)
BFN,

fp.


Yes, but that's nothing to do with the sensor bar though is it? The bowling game for example only uses the sensor bar for pointing at the menu etc?
#15
Benjimoron
Yes, but that's nothing to do with the sensor bar though is it? The bowling game for example only uses the sensor bar for pointing at the menu etc?


I never said it was! :)

BFN,

fp.
#16
fanpages
I never said it was! :)

BFN,

fp.


No, but lots of the people I know who have a wii think that the sensor bar is used when playing games (other than shooting etc). Just wanted to check that I was right when I say that the sensor bar system is used to point and the rest of the game stuff is done solely within the wiimote/nunchuck/motion plus itself? ie You could play the game pointing away from the tv and it would work much the same (maybe not the motion plus as it calibrates itself (sort of!!) with the sensor bar)).
#17
Benjimoron
No, but lots of the people I know who have a wii think that the sensor bar is used when playing games (other than shooting etc). Just wanted to check that I was right when I say that the sensor bar system is used to point and the rest of the game stuff is done solely within the wiimote/nunchuck/motion plus itself? ie You could play the game pointing away from the tv and it would work much the same (maybe not the motion plus as it calibrates itself (sort of!!) with the sensor bar)).


Just for clarity I will re-state what I typed above:

fanpages

The Wii Remote uses an internal ("ADXL330") accelerometer capable of sensing three individual axes & ("PixArt") optical sensor technology for communication with the Wii "sensor bar" (containing ten infrared Light-Emitting Diodes; five at each end of the bar). Movement can be detected up to 5 metres away by the use of "triangulating" light sources from the two sets of light clusters & the image sensor within the controller.

Height & Distance are calculated by the same method & rotation is controlled by the accelerometer acting as a tilt sensor.


Motion, Height & Distance are gained from triangulating infrared light from the Wii sensor bar.
Rotation is calculated by the use of the Wii remote control accelerometer sensor.

BFN,

fp.
#18
fanpages
Just for clarity I will re-state what I typed above:



Motion, Height & Distance are gained from triangulating infrared light from the Wii sensor bar.
Rotation is calculated by the use of the Wii remote control accelerometer sensor.

BFN,

fp.


How can it tell height? As it will just be seeing the same infrared lights on the sensor bar whether it's looking at them from the floor or the ceiling wouldn't it?

Also motion? How can it tell motion from the sensor bar? It can tell the point of the tv that the remote is aimed at but it can't tell motion can it? ie the wiimote could move from the left to the right of the screen always pointing at exactly the same point and the sensor bar system wouldn't be able to tell any motion as there would be no change in what the camera sees.
#19
Benjimoron
How can it tell height? As it will just be seeing the same infrared lights on the sensor bar whether it's looking at them from the floor or the ceiling wouldn't it?

Also motion? How can it tell motion from the sensor bar? It can tell the point of the tv that the remote is aimed at but it can't tell motion can it? ie the wiimote could move from the left to the right of the screen always pointing at exactly the same point and the sensor bar system wouldn't be able to tell any motion as there would be no change in what the camera sees.


In your example, the calculations may be a combination of rotation or fast motion (& this would be detected by the accelerometer) &/or slow lateral motion or a movement along one of the "sides" of the triangle.

A rapid change in forward/backward motion is handled by the accelerometer. Small variations in forward/backward motion can be detected by the Wii Sensor Bar & the Wii Remote's Image Sensor.

Small/slow motion in the Z-plane (backwards & forwards), and any motion in the X-plane (left & right), & Y-plane (up & down) [assuming the controller is held correctly] is gained by noting the time taken for the Wii Sensor Bar to communicate with the controller in the triangulation (by sending light from one end of the Sensor Bar & receiving it at the other once it has been "rebounded" back from the controller in the player's hand).

Simplistically, (large) variations in any axis (plane) is noted by the difference in time & angle of the returning light given that the distance between the Light-Emitting Diodes in relation to each other are known & used in the calculations.

The (official) Wii Sensor Bar is 35.3cm in length & should be located in the middle of the television. If the bar is above the TV then it should be placed in line with the front of the TV's casing (not the screen glass!). If placed below the TV then the bar should be directly in line with the surface (the unit) on which the TV is standing. If the Wii Sensor Bar is not located correctly this will affect game-play.

The Light-Emitting Diodes [LEDs] on the ends of the Wii Sensor Bar (those farthest away from each other) are pointed slightly outwards. The LEDs closest to the centre of the bar are pointed slightly inwards. All the others face forwards.

As we discussed above, it is not imperative to point directly at the Wii Sensor Bar, but being a significant angle away from the centre point (facing the Sensor Bar) is likely to disrupt the position-sensing features because of the limited angle of coverage of the LEDs.

The Wii Remote's Image Sensor is used to locate the Wii Sensor Bar's points of infrared light. If the field of view of the Wii Remote controller is limited, then the ability to calculate accurate readings will be hindered.

The light emitted from both ends of the Wii Sensor Bar is sent to, & focused upon, the Image Sensor in the Wii Remote controller. The distance between the two dots of light as they arrive at the Wii Remote will vary depending on the position of the player holding the controller relative to the Wii Sensor Bar.

The distance between the Wii Sensor Bar LEDs is a known constant distance (as I mentioned above) due to the precise manufactured length of the Bar & the position of the two outer LEDs upon it. The difference in the two distances (the variable distance of the two incoming light sources & the fixed known distance) is used within the Triangulation calculation to determine where the Wii Remote is in the line of sight of the Wii Sensor Bar.

The angle of approach of the two light sources hitting the Image Sensor gives the relative angle of rotation of the controller to the ground.


The Wii MotionPlus add-on device allows the Wii Remote to capture complex motion in a more accurate manner by using an internal (Tuning fork) gyroscope (that resonates in a known plane). Displacement of the resonating structures inside the gyroscope (relative to the known place) is used to indicate a rotation of the device.

This additional component supplements the existing accelerometer and Image Sensor capabilities to allow movements by the player to be accurate reproduced in real-time on the TV screen,

I hope that was clear; I tried to use plain (non-jargon) English as far as I could :)

BFN,

fp.
#20
"(by sending light from one end of the Sensor Bar & receiving it at the other once it has been "rebounded" back from the controller in the player's hand)."

So the sensor bar sends a signal to the wiimote then receives a rebound? Which is then sent back to the wii machine?
#21
Benjimoron
"(by sending light from one end of the Sensor Bar & receiving it at the other once it has been "rebounded" back from the controller in the player's hand)."

So the sensor bar sends a signal to the wiimote then receives a rebound? Which is then sent back to the wii machine?


In simple terms, yes.

I expanded on my first description towards the end of my post above:

fanpages

The light emitted from both ends of the Wii Sensor Bar is sent to, & focused upon, the Image Sensor in the Wii Remote controller. The distance between the two dots of light as they arrive at the Wii Remote will vary depending on the position of the player holding the controller relative to the Wii Sensor Bar.

The distance between the Wii Sensor Bar LEDs is a known constant distance (as I mentioned above) due to the precise manufactured length of the Bar & the position of the two outer LEDs upon it. The difference in the two distances (the variable distance of the two incoming light sources & the fixed known distance) is used within the Triangulation calculation to determine where the Wii Remote is in the line of sight of the Wii Sensor Bar.


BFN,

fp.
#22
Good price! And don't forget Heavy Rain is going to patched for Move for free! :thumbsup:
#23
Have you got a link to where it says that the signal is then bounced back to the sensor bar? As far as I'm aware it's just infrared LED's, nothing else. You can use candles as a replacement for example.
#24
Benjimoron
Have you got a link to where it says that the signal is then bounced back to the sensor bar? As far as I'm aware it's just infrared LED's, nothing else. You can use candles as a replacement for example.


Sorry, I did not know your level of appreciation of the technology when we started the discussions. It sounds (now) that you had some understanding in it already. Why the continued questioning? Are you planning on building your own motion-controlled device?

The "bouncing back" is by way of the Wii Remote interfacing with the console that then communicates with the Wii Sensor Bar again.

Yes, candles in the same room as the Wii console can interfere with the readings.

BFN,

fp.

[EDIT]
PS. Did you own a Wii? Will you be intending on buying either PlayStation Move or Kinect for Xbox 360?
[/EDIT]
#25
I know a fair bit about the technology and virtual reality/motion controls etc interest me very much.

I didn't understand what you mean about the bouncing back. The sensor bar is just powered, no data is sent to it is there?

I didn't mean candles interferring (although they would), I meant you can use candles as a sensor bar replacement (as that is all the sensor bar is, a source of IR light).

I don't own a wii (never will!) but I have a couple of wiimotes and infrared pens for various VR experiments!!!

If you haven't watched Johnny Lee's videos then they are well worth a watch.

I don't like the Kinect much as I don't think it will be accurate enough to do games well. Sony's Move is accurate enough and responsive enough. 60fps+ is needed IMO for this sort of stuff.
#26
Kinect is so pointless and useless, the casual market are fine with the Wii and all this is Microsoft trying to cash in. It's just going to waste developers time making substandard games using this limited motion control.
#27
http://www.wiimoteproject.com/index.php?action=forum

This forum is well worth a look too. It's basically projects made using the wiimotes. Kinda like Johnny Lee's but with some extras too.
#28
The (official) Wii Sensor Bar is 353cm in length & should be located in the middle of the television


:w00t:
#29
fanpages

The (official) Wii Sensor Bar is 353cm in length & should be located in the middle of the television


Johnboy_1975
:w00t:


Mine is just over three & a half metres but I don't use it as a rule.

Thanks; I've added the missing decimal place from my original comment :)

BFN,

fp.
banned#30
PS MOVE/Kinect comparison LINK
Quite an interesting read.
#31
sennasnit
PS MOVE/Kinect comparison LINK
Quite an interesting read.


Thanks. I'm interested in "The Fight: Lights Out" but was concerned about the potential for "lag" from hand to screen.

The review (apart from the odd statement "Any latency there may be was undetectable") seems to indicate that I need not be worried.

BFN,

fp.
#32
FYI: Microsoft reveals UK Kinect tour (MVCUK.com, today at 11:51 am, by Ben Parfitt)
---
Platform holder gives punters the chance to get to grips with new motion tech ahead of Q4 launch

Those wanting to try Kinect before deciding whether or not to invest in the device this Q4 will now get the chance thanks to five dates announced as part of a new UK tour.

The sampling program will visit Alton Towers, Chessington World of Adventures, London Zoo, The Thames Festival in London and the Clothes Show Live exhibition at the Birmingham NEC between now and December. Dance Central, Kinect Adventures, Joyride and Kinectimals will all be playable.

Visitors will also be able to record a 25 second video clip of their session which can later be watched at www.kinect.me.

In addition, Microsoft has opened a permanent summer testing base in London’s Covent Garden that’s been called the Kinect Galleries, which opens tomorrow (Saturday July 1st).

Slots for the Kinect Galleries can be booked on Kinect’s Facebook page.

Here are the details of the tour:

Alton Towers
30th August – 30th September 2010

London Zoo
7th-22nd August 2010

The Thames Festival in London
11th-12th September 2010

Chessington World of Adventures
21st-31st October 2010

Clothes Show Live in Birmingham (NEC)
2nd-8th December 2010

The Kinect Galleries will be open daily between 10am and 8pm at 4-6 Russell Street, Covent Garden, London, WC2E 7BN
---

BFN,

fp.
#33
FYI: Kinect Downgraded To Save Money, Can't Read Sign Language (Kotaku.com)
Luke Plunkett (Aug 11, 2010 12:30 AM)

The patent for Microsoft's motion-sensing camera Kinect suggested that the device could understand American Sign Language. Well, it can't. At least, the version going on sale in November can't.

Responding to the claims made in the patent, Microsoft has told Kotaku "We are excited about the potential of Kinect and its potential to impact gaming and entertainment. Microsoft files lots of patent applications to protect our intellectual property, not all of which are brought to market right away. Kinect that is shipping this holiday will not support sign language."

So why did the patent suggest it could? Well, sources close to the evolution of Kinect's development tell us it's because the version of the hardware that'll be available later this year isn't as capable as was originally intended.

The original Kinect had a much higher resolution (over twice that of the final model's 320x240), and as such, was able to not only recognise the limbs of a player as the current model version can, but their fingers as well (which the current version can't). And when the hardware could recognise fingers, it would have been able to read sign language.

But that capability came at a cost, and while Microsoft had always intended Kinect to sell for $150, "dumbing down" the camera would have meant that Microsoft wouldn't be losing as much money on each unit sold, an important point should Kinect prove to be a failure. So dumb it down they did, reducing the camera's resolution (which in turn reduced the number of appendages it'd have to track) and placing the burden for some of the device's processing on the console and not Kinect's own hardware.

This probably isn't the first time you've heard such a rumour, but this latest time at least explains why Kinect can't read sign language!


BFN,

fp.
#34
320 x 240. Wow! Can't see that being that accurate! If you watch a 240 video on youtube it can be quite difficult to work out what's going on, now try and get a computer to work out what's going on and accurately put that in the game!

Sony wins for me here.

I wonder if you could adapt the Sony tech to put it on the pc? The tracking of the globe would be easy but adding to it the tech inside the wand thing would be harder.
#35
Benjimoron
320 x 240. Wow! Can't see that being that accurate! If you watch a 240 video on youtube it can be quite difficult to work out what's going on, now try and get a computer to work out what's going on and accurately put that in the game!

Sony wins for me here.

I wonder if you could adapt the Sony tech to put it on the pc? The tracking of the globe would be easy but adding to it the tech inside the wand thing would be harder.


That resolution is for the highest colo[u]r depth:

(From my opening comment in this thread)
fanpages

Data Streams
320x240 16-bit depth @ 30 frames/sec
640x480 32-bit colour@ 30 frames/sec
16-bit audio @ 16 kHz


Also the rumoured "six metre area" required to play is also looking like it may be true...

Kinect Adventures Preview – Having A Ball (DealsPwn.com)

Also see the "Epic Flail" video footage:
Microsoft release official ghastly Kinetic (natal) video

http://i49.tinypic.com/6dzhc6.jpg

BFN,

fp.

Edited By: fanpages on Aug 11, 2010 14:34: Added subsequent "Misc" thread link
#36
Isn't that the wrong way round then?

"Data Streams
320x240 16-bit depth @ 30 frames/sec
640x480 32-bit colour@ 30 frames/sec"

Shouldn't it only be 16 bit at 640x480?

Your story you posted earlier suggested that the final model is only 320x240??

Either way, 30fps isn't enough. Look how much those dudes are moving!!!
#37
fanpages
FYI: Microsoft reveals UK Kinect tour (MVCUK.com, today at 11:51 am, by Ben Parfitt)---Platform holder gives punters the chance to get to grips with new motion tech ahead of Q4 launchThose wanting to try Kinect before deciding whether or not to invest in the device this Q4 will now get the chance thanks to five dates announced as part of a new UK tour.The sampling program will visit Alton Towers, Chessington World of Adventures, London Zoo, The Thames Festival in London and the Clothes Show Live exhibition at the Birmingham NEC between now and December. Dance Central, Kinect Adventures, Joyride and Kinectimals will all be playable.Visitors will also be able to record a 25 second video clip of their session which can later be watched at www.kinect.me.In addition, Microsoft has opened a permanent summer testing base in London’s Covent Garden that’s been called the Kinect Galleries, which opens tomorrow (Saturday July 1st).Slots for the Kinect Galleries can be booked on Kinect’s Facebook page.Here are the details of the tour:Alton Towers30th August – 30th September 2010London Zoo7th-22nd August 2010The Thames Festival in London11th-12th September 2010Chessington World of Adventures21st-31st October 2010Clothes Show Live in Birmingham (NEC)2nd-8th December 2010The Kinect Galleries will be open daily between 10am and 8pm at 4-6 Russell Street, Covent Garden, London, WC2E 7BN---BFN,fp.

A UK Kinect tour? Sounds more like an England Kinect tour!
#38
bazzaric
A UK Kinect tour? Sounds more like an England Kinect tour!

Yeah... sorry; but that is what it is called! Maybe more Northern, Western & off-mainland dates will be added throughout the month.

The whole of Europe is just one of those States people in America don't visit often though.

BFN,

fp.
#39
Benjimoron
Isn't that the wrong way round then?"Data Streams320x240 16-bit depth @ 30 frames/sec640x480 32-bit colour@ 30 frames/sec"Shouldn't it only be 16 bit at 640x480?Your story you posted earlier suggested that the final model is only 320x240??Either way, 30fps isn't enough. Look how much those dudes are moving!!!

I hope Play.com transposed that incorrectly from the Microsoft press release.

Either way, here is some more information:

At a frame rate of 30 Hz the RGB video stream is at 32-bit colo[u]r "VGA" [Video Graphics Array] resolution (640x480 pixels).

The monochrome video stream is for depth-sensing at 16-bit colo[u]r "QVGA" [Quarter Video Graphics Array] resolution. That is 320x240 pixels with 65,536 levels of sensitivity.

It seems the Kinect sensor has an operating distance range of 1.2m to 3.5m (3.9 feet to 11 feet) with an field of view up to 57 degrees in the horizontal plane & 43 degrees vertically reached by the motorised pivot on the base of the device being able to tilt the Kinect sensor up to 27 degrees in a vertical plane.

The four microphone array capsules operate at a sampling rate of 16 kHz processing 16-bit audio for each channel.

I've added this information to the opening comment.

BFN,

fp.
#40
fanpages
Benjimoron
320 x 240. Wow! Can't see that being that accurate! If you watch a 240 video on youtube it can be quite difficult to work out what's going on, now try and get a computer to work out what's going on and accurately put that in the game!

Sony wins for me here.

I wonder if you could adapt the Sony tech to put it on the pc? The tracking of the globe would be easy but adding to it the tech inside the wand thing would be harder.


That resolution is for the highest colo[u]r depth
:

(From my opening comment in this thread)
fanpages

Data Streams
320x240 16-bit depth @ 30 frames/sec
640x480 32-bit colour@ 30 frames/sec
16-bit audio @ 16 kHz


Also the rumoured "six metre area" required to play is also looking like it may be true...

Kinect Adventures Preview – Having A Ball (DealsPwn.com)

Also see the "Epic F lail" video footage:
Microsoft release official ghastly Kinetic (natal) video

http://i49.tinypic.com/6dzhc6.jpg

BFN,

fp.


Do you not mean lowest, as that's for depth tracking?

And why do you say monochrome when 16 bit is colour? 1 bit is mono.

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