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landlord trouble where to get help?

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my mate is privately renting a house which has awful damp down the walls and all over ceilings,she has told landlord he keeps saying he will send someone round but never does,her windows are also the …
edjaned Avatar
8y, 4m agoPosted 8 years, 4 months ago
my mate is privately renting a house which has awful damp down the walls and all over ceilings,she has told landlord he keeps saying he will send someone round but never does,her windows are also the old type which open fully with no catch and are single glazed.she has 3 children and is wondering if the damp could effect their health and where to go to for help
edjaned Avatar
8y, 4m agoPosted 8 years, 4 months ago
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1 Like #1
call in the council
[mod] 1 Like #2
as above. rung the council on my prevoius landlord as the heating didnt work for 3 weeks the council came round and within a week workers knocked on the door.
banned 1 Like #3
sharonwai
call in the council


no ^^^^^ call in health and safety esspecially if she has children as damp will fall to them as its a health issue
#4
She may be worried that the landlord will be trouble after she has reported him, maybe she could get someone esle to report him saying that they have been to visit her and seen the conditions.
#5
Who you gonna call?
#6
didnt realise she could get onto council,when u say health and safety who does she ring?
1 Like #7
The private sector housing team at the council I believe is the dept you want.
#8
Environmental health are all contactable via the council anyway so if she calls main line they can advise which dept etc to deal with.
#9
Damp isn't recognised as a health risk, so setting the dogs on the landlord will only result in 1 loser, and it isn't the landlord.

Has she anything in writing to the landlord regarding the conditions
#10
kidcat
She may be worried that the landlord will be trouble after she has reported him, maybe she could get someone esle to report him saying that they have been to visit her and seen the conditions.


yes she is worried about that.....she has not lived in the house long but has lived in his houses for 5 years and she loves the house she is in now
#11
thesaint
Damp isn't recognised as a health risk, so setting the dogs on the landlord will only result in 1 loser, and it isn't the landlord.

Has she anything in writing to the landlord regarding the conditions


no she hasnt wrote to him,just spoke in person so far
1 Like #12
edjaned
yes she is worried about that.....she has not lived in the house long but has lived in his houses for 5 years and she loves the house she is in now


Health visitors can often be useful for these sort of things, if she complains then the landlord knows its not his tenant. :)
banned#13
thesaint
Damp isn't recognised as a health risk, so setting the dogs on the landlord will only result in 1 loser, and it isn't the landlord.

Has she anything in writing to the landlord regarding the conditions


Housing health and safety
The Housing Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS) is the risk assessment procedure for residential properties. It replaced the Housing Fitness Regime on the 6 April 2006 in England, and in Wales later that year. HHSRS also replaces the Fitness Standard as an element of the Decent Homes Standard.

How does the Housing Health and Safety Rating System affect me?
Private landlords
In practice, private landlords and managing agents will be most affected by HHSRS assessments. Local authorities will take a strategic approach to the use of their new powers. They will continue to respond to complaints from tenants, and they will also be able to assess properties subject to HMO licensing.

Public sector landlords
Public sector landlords also need to incorporate HHSRS into their stock condition surveys. To be decent, all homes in the social sector should be free of category 1 hazards. Information on HHSRS has been available since July 2000 and stock condition surveys should now include HHSRS. If a landlord is about to embark on a programme of work then housing managers should consider whether there are any category 1 hazards that need to be included in the refurbishment works.

Builders
Maintenance builders should be aware of the change in health and safety assessment and understand the basic principles of HHSRS. In properties with serious hazards, enforcement action will usually be against the owner, and builders would not be liable under HHSRS. However, there may be grounds for occupiers to take civil action under different legislation, such as the Building Act.

Surveyors
Surveyors should be aware of the replacement of the Fitness Standard by HHSRS and understand its basic principles. Valuation surveyors do not need to refer to HHSRS when carrying out homebuyer surveys.

If you cannot find the information you need in this section or would like more details about the Housing Health and Safety Rating System please email: [email protected]">[email protected]

You can return to this page by using the quick link [url]www.communities.gov.uk/hhsrs[/url]

Case Study
Doreen Slade (55) and her son Dean (36), live in a three-storey mid terraced house built circa 1910. They rent the property from a private landlord. Doreen has made a complaint to the local authority about the state of the house after her requests for improvements were not taken seriously by her landlord.

The property has solid brick walls, with a tiled pitch roof. On the ground floor there is a living room to the front and kitchen to the rear. Also on the ground floor is a w.c. which is accessible only from the outside. A winding staircase leads directly off the kitchen. On the first floor there is a bedroom at the front and another smaller bedroom and bathroom at the rear. The staircase continues up to the roofspace where a third bedroom with a dormer window is situated.

The windows were replaced with uPVC double glazing around 15 years ago which is now falling apart. The property is heated by individual gas fires in the living room, kitchen and main bedroom. There is no central heating and the other bedrooms use electric heaters. There is a small amount of rising damp at low level in the kitchen.

In Doreen and Dean's house, the old Housing Fitness Standard would have only picked up on rising damp as a problem. HHSRS identifies the rising damp as well as a cold and collision risk as category 2 hazards. However, it also identifies two more serious hazards, potential falls on the stairs and a fire risk. These are category 1 hazards, the most serious under HHSRS.

Problems identified under Fitness Standard: Hazards identified by HHSRS using risk assessment
Rising damp Damp and mould growth (rising damp)
Falls on stairs (staircase)
Fire (no smoke alarms and inadequate means of escape)
Cold (no roof insulation and no central heating)
Collision risk (cramped kitchen cupboards and attic chimney breast)


Action carried out under Fitness Standard Action carried out under HHSRS
Rising damp: install or repair damp proof course Rising damp: add or repair damp proof course, ensure rooms are adequately heated and ventilated.
Staircase: fix secure handrails, add extra lighting, remove coat hooks
Fire: replace gas and electric fire with central heating, install smoke detectors and fire doors to the kitchen an attic room.
Cold: install 250mm roof insulation and full central heating system.
Bumps and crashes: remove kitchen cupboards by door; re hang attic door away from chimney breast or put up fluorescent sign.
#14
thesaint
Damp isn't recognised as a health risk, so setting the dogs on the landlord will only result in 1 loser, and it isn't the landlord.

Has she anything in writing to the landlord regarding the conditions


edjaned
no she hasnt wrote to him,just spoke in person so far



I know it's laborious, but she needs it in writing to proceed properly.

She needs to document when she has spoken to him, and from now on only write to him, and not bother with the phone. If she does phone, she needs to follow it with a letter.

Something like "As per our phone conversation on the 18th Nov 2008"...

When she writes she needs to enclose a copy of the previous correspondence.

fragaliciousbob
Housing health and safety
The Housing Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS) is the risk assessment procedure for residential properties. It replaced the Housing Fitness Regime on the 6 April 2006 in England, and in Wales later that year. HHSRS also replaces the Fitness Standard as an element of the Decent Homes Standard.

How does the Housing Health and Safety Rating System affect me?
Private landlords
In practice, private landlords and managing agents will be most affected by HHSRS assessments. Local authorities will take a strategic approach to the use of their new powers. They will continue to respond to complaints from tenants, and they will also be able to assess properties subject to HMO licensing.



Nice copy and paste. What does that mean in the real world?
#15
jellybaby22
GHOSTBUSTERS !!!!!


I knew you'd be there for me.
banned#16
thesaint
I know it's laborious, but she needs it in writing to proceed properly.

She needs to document when she has spoken to him, and from now on only write to him, and not bother with the phone. If she does phone, she needs to follow it with a letter.

Something like "As per our phone conversation on the 18th Nov 2008"...

When she writes she needs to enclose a copy of the previous correspondence.



Nice copy and paste. What does that mean in the real world?


well as i'm in the building trade and know about these sort of regs just coming out and saying that its not a health issue with no knowledge of what your talking about is frankly shocking that you think you can advise someone on these sort of issues
#17
hello
we have been down this road once before.
call in the housing officer and health vistor and get in touch with health and environment aswell.
#18
fragaliciousbob
well as i'm in the building trade and know about these sort of regs just coming out and saying that its not a health issue with no knowledge of what your talking about is frankly shocking that you think you can advise someone on these sort of issues


I can't see anything that you copied and pasted that suggests it is, I have been to umpteen council properties that have damp in them, and they are deemed habitable.

I base my "Advice" on real world experience of working for my local councils Housing department, two housing associations, and being a landlord.

When you say you are in the "Building trade" what does that mean?
#19
Erm, damp is classed as a Physiological hazard under the Housing Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS). If any action is taken by your local authority depends on how the bad the problem is, so don't expect wonders if there are only a few small patches here and there.

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