Laptop Charger Help - Amperage and Voltage problems - HotUKDeals
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Laptop Charger Help - Amperage and Voltage problems

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I am looking for a replacement laptop charger for my wifes laptop. Its needs to be 20v and 3.25A. I've been offered one that has the same tip that fits, and is for the same make of laptop (albeit a d… Read More
FearTheBassPlayer Avatar
7y, 10m agoPosted 7 years, 10 months ago
I am looking for a replacement laptop charger for my wifes laptop. Its needs to be 20v and 3.25A. I've been offered one that has the same tip that fits, and is for the same make of laptop (albeit a different model) that is 19v and 4.22A.

Will this cause any damage if I try to use it? Does the difference in figures actaully mean anything?
FearTheBassPlayer Avatar
7y, 10m agoPosted 7 years, 10 months ago
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#1
anyone?
#2
Hi Bassman - this will work fine. The only thing to check is that the polarity at the tip is the same. i.e. the outer and inner contacts have the same +ve or -ve symbol ( does that make sense?).

Hope that answers your question.
#3
I dont think that charger would work. You will need a 20v charger with a minimum of 3.25a. It doesnt matter whether it is more amps as it will automatically lower but won't increase wattage
#4
ivanwilson
Hi Bassman - this will work fine. The only thing to check is that the polarity at the tip is the same. i.e. the outer and inner contacts have the same +ve or -ve symbol ( does that make sense?).

Hope that answers your question.


It doesn't answer my question how can you give someone that advise when you couldn't possibly know it will work, do you work at PC world? there has been no mention of make model or nothing else you can buy a universal laptop psu that come with a few different plugs that fit 99% of laptops and on those psu's is a voltage selector and polarity selector the reason for this is because they may have the same plug/socket doesn't mean there compatible, take the HP laptops most use a yellow tip with a circle with a line through it and you can plug a universal psu with a certain tip in and it fits but it doesn't work just because it fits doesn't make it right.

OP if you take any notice of this guy you might blow your laptop up you would'nt go to a PC shop and say i need a psu and they just give you one they have knocking about because its similar would you, when all the volts it uses is 20v 1v is a lot.

Be careful just because it fits doesn't mean it will work and even if it does it may damage the very delicate components inside the laptop. The fact you've asked tells me your not sure and the specs you have posted are not the same your old psu 20v and 3.25A and the replacement 19v and 4.22A there's more amps on the new/offered psu and 1 less volt it may not sound a lot but if you have a CPU that uses 1.3v and you stick 1.8 up it chances are very high you would fry it and that's only 0.5v more laptops are built to a very stringent spec and parts inside are rated to work at that spec not above or below.

If you do a search for replacement power supply for your model laptop you will find a replacement psu usually by the oem and it will have a list of laptops that are compatible with the psu and if on that list of compatible laptops is the laptop that your offered psu came from you should be alright but don't assume that because the plugs are the same they are the same.
#5
donnydude
I dont think that charger would work. You will need a 20v charger with a minimum of 3.25a. It doesnt matter whether it is more amps as it will automatically lower but won't increase wattage


You are right but there's no mention of model or nothing its speced at 20v not 19v if it could run on 19v the oem would have given a 19v psu as it saves a little more energy. As I've said just because it fits doesn't make it right, my screwdriver fit in the live of a plug socket but i wouldn't stick it in there.
#6
I can't be much help I'm afraid except to say DONT trust the compatibillity lists OEM PSU manufacturers give.
In just a few hours I killed the battery on my laptop using a 'compatible' PSU that actually had too high output.
#7
Ivan's answer is the most accurate IMHO.

The small drop in voltage will probably have no effect and since it's lower than the original will definitely not cause any damage. The increased current capability defines the maximum current the PSU can deliver not what it delivers all the time. The laptop will be fitted with internal regulator IC's which will compensate for small voltage differences in the power supply.

His advice about checking the polarity of the connector is spot on also. This information should be on the PSU somewhere usually amonst the blub on the back. Look for a diagram of the end of the connector with lines indicating + and -, and compare this to the old PSU.

I don't work in PC World (does anyone??)
#8
Thanks Krosus; I thought Polly was a bit rude but how was she to know I repaired laptop chargers. ;-)
#9
ivanwilson
Thanks Krosus; I thought Polly was a bit rude but how was she to know I repaired laptop chargers. ;-)


Not to mention grammatically and factually challenged :thumbsup:

We'll possibly get accused of nepotism since we're both in Belfast but I can assure all readers it's pure coincidence. Ivan and I have never met. In fact I only noticed the coincidence after I posted.

By the way Bassman, did you get the problem resolved?

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