LCD with a line across the display. - HotUKDeals
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LCD with a line across the display.

Adam2050 Avatar
5y, 11m agoPosted 5 years, 11 months ago
Easy to fix or just something to live with?

As it's just a cheap monitor I was given, ideal for testing.
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Adam2050 Avatar
5y, 11m agoPosted 5 years, 11 months ago
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#1
can be a number of things.

1. monitor at fault
2. VGA Cable faulty
3. Motherboard VGA connector at fault.

Try the monitor on another PC and also try another VGA cable if possible.
#2
It's the first.
#3
dcx_badass
Tried it with a different PC? And probably not easy to fix, not financially justifiable anyway.

Yep it's been tried on 3 cards from different pc's and different pcs.

Just wondering if it was internal connection problem but guessing it's the LCD inverter or whatever it's called.
#4
Adam2050
dcx_badass
Tried it with a different PC? And probably not easy to fix, not financially justifiable anyway.
Yep it's been tried on 3 cards from different pc's and different pcs.Just wondering if it was internal connection problem but guessing it's the LCD inverter or whatever it's called.

The problem is definitely not the power inverter because the inverter provides AC to the backlight and it is impossible for a fault with a backlight to cause a line across the screen. I love the above diagnosis and I think we all know the problem could be the monitor or cable or board! Imagine going to the doctor and saying I have a headache with the response being well, it could be your head or your brain or your skull!

The issue is that the LCD driver board consists of datalines, both horizontal and vertical, that form a matrix for the display. One of the datalines is being set with zeroes or incorrect RGB codes. You will have to replace the driver board and they cost around £20-£40.
#5
ElliottC
Adam2050
dcx_badass
Tried it with a different PC? And probably not easy to fix, not financially justifiable anyway.
Yep it's been tried on 3 cards from different pc's and different pcs.Just wondering if it was internal connection problem but guessing it's the LCD inverter or whatever it's called.
The problem is definitely not the power inverter because the inverter provides AC to the backlight and it is impossible for a fault with a backlight to cause a line across the screen. I love the above diagnosis and I think we all know the problem could be the monitor or cable or board! Imagine going to the doctor and saying I have a headache with the response being well, it could be your head or your brain or your skull!The issue is that the LCD driver board consists of datalines, both horizontal and vertical, that form a matrix for the display. One of the datalines is being set with zeroes or incorrect RGB codes. You will have to replace the driver board and they cost around £20-£40.

Cheers, knew I had the wrong name, yep it's going to be left as it is. Not worth the money.
#6
ElliottC
Adam2050
dcx_badass
Tried it with a different PC? And probably not easy to fix, not financially justifiable anyway.
Yep it's been tried on 3 cards from different pc's and different pcs.Just wondering if it was internal connection problem but guessing it's the LCD inverter or whatever it's called.


The problem is definitely not the power inverter because the inverter provides AC to the backlight and it is impossible for a fault with a backlight to cause a line across the screen. I love the above diagnosis and I think we all know the problem could be the monitor or cable or board! Imagine going to the doctor and saying I have a headache with the response being well, it could be your head or your brain or your skull!

The issue is that the LCD driver board consists of datalines, both horizontal and vertical, that form a matrix for the display. One of the datalines is being set with zeroes or incorrect RGB codes. You will have to replace the driver board and they cost around £20-£40.


Is it not more likely that the actual TFT matrix is physically damaged?
#7
jah128
ElliottC
Adam2050
dcx_badass
Tried it with a different PC? And probably not easy to fix, not financially justifiable anyway.
Yep it's been tried on 3 cards from different pc's and different pcs.Just wondering if it was internal connection problem but guessing it's the LCD inverter or whatever it's called.
The problem is definitely not the power inverter because the inverter provides AC to the backlight and it is impossible for a fault with a backlight to cause a line across the screen. I love the above diagnosis and I think we all know the problem could be the monitor or cable or board! Imagine going to the doctor and saying I have a headache with the response being well, it could be your head or your brain or your skull!The issue is that the LCD driver board consists of datalines, both horizontal and vertical, that form a matrix for the display. One of the datalines is being set with zeroes or incorrect RGB codes. You will have to replace the driver board and they cost around £20-£40.
Is it not more likely that the actual TFT matrix is physically damaged?

No, because there is a complete line at fault.
#8
ElliottC
No, because there is a complete line at fault.


Yeah, and if the relevant row connection on the substrate is damaged the whole row will be inactive... Its far easier to damage a 100 square inch piece of soft-coated silicon than it is an integrated circuit...
#9
jah128
ElliottC
No, because there is a complete line at fault.
Yeah, and if the relevant row connection on the substrate is damaged the whole row will be inactive... Its far easier to damage a 100 square inch piece of soft-coated silicon than it is an integrated circuit...

How common would that be for one signle complete line? Not arguing the point but I would be interested. The fault is one single line and I'm not sure how eaasy it is to damage the panel in such a way for this to occur. I would still pin the blame at the driver board.

As there are 2 glass substrates would it be possible that if one of them was damaged then it would be possible to see one lit pixel on the line that is causing the problem?

Edited By: ElliottC on Dec 09, 2010 14:50: .
#10
ElliottC
jah128
ElliottC
No, because there is a complete line at fault.
Yeah, and if the relevant row connection on the substrate is damaged the whole row will be inactive... Its far easier to damage a 100 square inch piece of soft-coated silicon than it is an integrated circuit...


How common would that be for one signle complete line? Not arguing the point but I would be interested. The fault is one single line and I'm not sure how eaasy it is to damage the panel in such a way for this to occur. I would still pin the blame at the driver board.


I suspect it is uncommon, but I would presume quite possible either on the matrix itself or on its edge connectors. As you say though, more often numerous lines will be broken.
#11
jah128
ElliottC
jah128
ElliottC
No, because there is a complete line at fault.
Yeah, and if the relevant row connection on the substrate is damaged the whole row will be inactive... Its far easier to damage a 100 square inch piece of soft-coated silicon than it is an integrated circuit...
How common would that be for one signle complete line? Not arguing the point but I would be interested. The fault is one single line and I'm not sure how eaasy it is to damage the panel in such a way for this to occur. I would still pin the blame at the driver board.
I suspect it is uncommon, but I would presume quite possible either on the matrix itself or on its edge connectors. As you say though, more often numerous lines will be broken.

Well, we need confirmation if it is one single line of pixels or a thick line but this is probably academic anyway since buying a replacement board is cheaper than the panel itself.
#12
I've come across this a number of times and as has been pointed out it's almost certainly connection damage at the edge of the TFT panel, sometimes instigated by undue pressure through over zealous cleaning.
Not worth repair, in my opinion
#13
miriam51
I've come across this a number of times and as has been pointed out it's almost certainly connection damage at the edge of the TFT panel, sometimes instigated by undue pressure through over zealous cleaning.Not worth repair, in my opinion

On each occasion you've experienced this can you confirm the colour of the line across the screen? Did you still see the line (albeit faintly) after the display was switched off?

Again, I am not arguing your point and this is not a game of one-upmanship but I am very interested in this since I have NEVER experienced an issue in which the LCD panel was responsible for a single line across the screen. If you've obtained the information from various forums then be aware that a lot of what is posted is guesswork without an understanding of how LCD panels work. What you may have found in Google does not transpire that the most popular answers in the forums is the coorect diagnosis of the issue. Was this genuinely based on your numerous experiences?

I've had a look at the usual faults and the following sites mention the driver board or the connection between the driver board and the panel (OK, the first one is a forum rather than from a specialist but the information given is very good):

http://www.ifixit.com/Answers/View/1549/Permanent+gray+line+on+screen

http://en.community.dell.com/dell-blogs/Direct2Dell/b/direct2dell/archive/2008/01/16/lcd-lines-common-causes.aspx


http://www.jestineyong.com/?p=1224

What exactly did you see when you experienced over zealous cleaning of the screen?


Edited By: ElliottC on Dec 09, 2010 19:47: .
#14
Sorry for late reply. In the cases I have come across, commonly, several apparently random and most often, vertical row of pixel width lines (coloured) have been observed following undue pressure at the top or bottom edge of the TFT panel - I'm talking permanent damage here.

A single, horizontal black line could, as you say be something different i.e the drive circuitry but given the relatively fragile nature of display panels & their multitude of connections, I would more often suspect the panel itself.

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