Maintanence advice - HotUKDeals
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Maintanence advice

Redking Avatar
8y, 3m agoPosted 8 years, 3 months ago
my friend divorced his wife about ten years ago and has been paying maintenance for his daughter since.
last week she got accepted into uni.she will be getting a loan but plans to stay living at home with her mum.my friend wants to know if he still is obliged to pay maintance to his ex wife.
no court order was made and CSA have never been involved-it was agreed on an amicable basis.
anyone have any experience in this
Redking Avatar
8y, 3m agoPosted 8 years, 3 months ago
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#1
Until the kid leaves further education
#2
i thought generally it was til 18 years-but he has made his own arrangements all these years, wont he want to help her through uni anyway?
#3
louloo
i thought generally it was til 18 years-but he has made his own arrangements all these years, wont he want to help her through uni anyway?


i thought 18 too.

he might not want to pay if he never gets to see her
#4
bigbob909
i thought 18 too.

he might not want to pay if he never gets to see her


makes no difference if he sees her or not-she is still his child-i have five kids-you dont get a choice when to support them or when to see them-they are your responsibility (and i have a feeling I will always be keeping them:x)
it will be the hardest time for his daughter and ex as she will lose any benefits she had for her too.
#5
Yes he will have to continue to pay maintenance for his daughter while she continues her education and its irrespective as to whether he sees her or not, he still has a duty to maintain his child.
#6
Why not go to your local Citizens Advice Bureau they give free and confitdental advice .:)
#7
Of course he still has to pay, she could win the lottery tomorrow and marry Bill Gates, he still has a responsibility to pay for his child
#8
wat he could do is make an agreement with his ex to pay it straight to his daughter
#9
#10
You owe child maintenance until your children are at the very least, 16 years old. If you have several children and one is over 16 and the rest are not, you still owe child maintenance for the children who are under 16. As each child progresses to the age of 16, your child maintenance payments will be reduced accordingly until all the children are of age.
However, 16 is the minimum age where child maintenance can stop. Between the ages of 16 and 19, if the child is enrolled full-time in school (more than 12 hours per week and the course is up to and including A level), child maintenance for the child must be paid. This does not apply to advanced study, like study at a college or university, this only includes non-advanced study. Although a child may have several long breaks, the non-custodial parent still owes child maintenance during school breaks. If the child leaves full-time schooling in the summer, the non-custodial parent generally owes child support until the first week of September, of that year.
For example: You have three children, an 11 year old, a 16 year old and an eighteen year old. You must pay child maintenance for the 11 year old no matter what kind of school she is or isn’t in - under no circumstances do you not owe child maintenance for her to the custodial parent. The 16 year old may be a different story. If your 16-year-old child has left school, you can stop paying child maintenance in September of the year she left. This is because since she left school, it is time for her to get a job and be responsible. No one should have to pay maintenance on someone who is able to work and support him or herself. But let’s say then that your 18-year-old is still studying for A levels and wants to go to university. You would still owe child maintenance for this child because she is in school, non-advanced study and under the age of 19.

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