Map/Distance Apps; HELP! - HotUKDeals
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Map/Distance Apps; HELP!

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6y, 11m agoPosted 6 years, 11 months ago
I need to plan a route for work to visit and drop off some information to aout 20 schools in the area.

Is there anything I can do, not only to plot the route, but to enable me to find the quickest/easiest/less mileage route?

I know you can enter postcodes into google, but then you need to enter them in order and I don't have that order?
Disco Avatar
6y, 11m agoPosted 6 years, 11 months ago
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Comments/page:
#1
Print them all off in aa route planner and you should be able to do it yourself.

Have them all laid out, start from where you are, and find the best route for yourself, without too much doubling back on yourself.
#2
Multimap.com is quite good . Type in the postcode to get a Map/Arial/OS. Goto direction and type from , then too and it gives a breakdown of the journey with distance and time at the top .
I think most sites like this will do the same job though , AA for instance but theres lots of other too .
#3
If you calculated the distance between each place and applied dijkstra's algorythm it would work but it's a lot of effort a computer could do in literally seconds.
#4
Jakg
If you calculated the distance between each place and applied dijkstra's algorythm it would work but it's a lot of effort a computer could do in literally seconds.


What?!
#5
a little info on that Dijkstra's mularky .

Dijkstra's algorithm, conceived by Dutch computer scientist Edsger Dijkstra in 1959, is a graph search algorithm that solves the single-source shortest path problem for a graph with nonnegative edge path costs, producing a shortest path tree. This algorithm is often used in routing. An equivalent algorithm was developed by Edward F. Moore in 1957.

I dont think it's as easy as it looks !

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