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maths question

shamus1975 Avatar
6y, 3w agoPosted 6 years, 3 weeks ago
ok so you have a hot water cylinder with a radius of 20cm and a height of 120cm, what is the volume of the cylinder in cubic centimetres using the formulas pi R2h
and pi being 3 not the 3.14.
????
shamus1975 Avatar
6y, 3w agoPosted 6 years, 3 weeks ago
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#1
Reckon it is 144,000 cm3
#2
pi is neither 3 not 3.14 but, if you must...

Volume of a cylinder is the area times the height. Area is pi times the square of the radius.

So volume = 3 x (20 x 20) x 120 = 3 x 400 x 120 = 144,000cm^3
#3
3(pi)x (20x20) r squared) x 120 (height)

3x400x120

144,000 cm3 (cubed)
#4
Why ask us when you have all the information and the actual formula? oO
#5
pi is 3.142 or to be pricise 3.14159265 so when i said 3.142 that was pi rounded to 3 decimal places.
ro53ben
pi is neither 3 not 3.14 but, if you must...Volume of a cylinder is the area times the height. Area is pi times the square of the radius.So volume = 3 x (20 x 20) x 120 = 3 x 400 x 120 = 144,000cm^3


Edited By: shamus1975 on Nov 15, 2010 14:20
#6
and your all correct so part 2 easy part

one cubic centimetre of water weighs 0.001kg. so when the cylinder is full what will the water weigh in KG's.
#7
cdm22
Why ask us when you have all the information and the actual formula? oO

^^^^^This^^^^^
#8
shamus1975
and your all correct so part 2 easy partone cubic centimetre of water weighs 0.001kg. so when the cylinder is full what will the water weigh in KG's.

Can you seriously not work this out yourself???
#9
shamus1975
and your all correct so part 2 easy part

one cubic centimetre of water weighs 0.001kg. so when the cylinder is full what will the water weigh in KG's.


Depends. 1ml of water only weighs one gramme at 4 degrees Celcius. This is a hot water tank, so the water will have expanded and have a lower overall density.

So we need to know the temperature of the water in the tank and also whether the volume of the tank is measured when cold or hot.
#10
144kg at STP
#11
cannyscot
144kg at STP


Actually, no. STP is either 0C or 20C and the water wouldn't weigh 144kg at either of those.

In fact, there are many definitions of STP but none of them involve 4 Celcius.

Edited By: ro53ben on Nov 15, 2010 14:45
#12
ro53ben
cannyscot
144kg at STP


Actually, no. STP is either 0C or 20C and the water wouldn't weigh 144kg at either of those.

In fact, there are many definitions of STP but none of them involve 4 Celcius.


Quite so, but since you and the original poster are using mass and weight as synonymous and the OP is taking Pi as 3, 144 is a good enough approximation.

Edited By: cannyscot on Nov 15, 2010 15:01
#13
cannyscot

Quite so, but since you and the original poster are using mass and weight as synonymous and the OP is taking Pi as 3, 144 is a good enough approximation.


Agreed :)
#14
yes cant you its just a bit of afternoon trivia i noticed you never answered
civms47
shamus1975
and your all correct so part 2 easy partone cubic centimetre of water weighs 0.001kg. so when the cylinder is full what will the water weigh in KG's.
Can you seriously not work this out yourself???


Edited By: shamus1975 on Nov 15, 2010 15:27
#15
yeah just a question we set in a quiz, did not think of the temperture coming into effect, lets hope we dont get some clever person answering lol.
well done any ways.

ro53ben
cannyscot
Quite so, but since you and the original poster are using mass and weight as synonymous and the OP is taking Pi as 3, 144 is a good enough approximation.
Agreed :)
#16
Who on god's earth would approximate pi to 3? 150kg is much closer to the answer (and simpler) than 144kg.
#17
its simplified for a pub quiz, its a bit of fun not a real life renovation product
jah128
Who on god's earth would approximate pi to 3? 150kg is much closer to the answer (and simpler) than 144kg.

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