Millions have less than £100 in savings, study finds- surely not? - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HotUKDeals, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HotUKDeals app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit

Millions have less than £100 in savings, study finds- surely not?

£0.00 @
In may areas of the country and especially NI there are more than 50% of adults who have less than £100 in savings - so where are you lot stashing it all? More than 16m people in the UK have saving… Read More
sowotsdis Avatar
7m, 3w agoPosted 7 months, 3 weeks ago
In may areas of the country and especially NI there are more than 50% of adults who have less than £100 in savings - so where are you lot stashing it all?

More than 16m people in the UK have savings of less than £100, a study by the Money Advice Service (MAS) has found.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-37504449
sowotsdis Avatar
7m, 3w agoPosted 7 months, 3 weeks ago
Options

Top Comments

(5)
11 Likes
I would say that it's not really 'less than £100 in savings', but that they have no savings at all. In a modern society where so many things are expensive, lots of people 'work to zero' each month, where every penny is accounted for, and nothing is left over. Just a sign of the times.
banned 11 Likes
I've always saved what I can from a young age and have built up a healthy little fund that I very rarely dip into.

Mind you I am a tight git, I've been told I squeak when I walk.
7 Likes
Predikuesi
MrScotchBonnet
I've always saved what I can from a young age and have built up a healthy little fund that I very rarely dip into.
Mind you I am a tight git, I've been told I squeak when I walk.
That's exactly what we've done over the years. I see some of our friends going on holidays several times a year, constantly eating out, buying the latest new gadget, and always having a new car. One day they'll realise they have no money.
I don't think I squeak et though.
Trouble with material things like new cars, the latest gadget ect.... You find the novelty soon wears off & there's always something else new just around the corner, then your left paying for it for the next god knows how many years.
A lot of friends i know have split up with their partners because they're constantly skint at the end of each month & argue over never having any money to do anything. The same people funnily enough who were having brand new cars, two holidays a year all the latest gadgets 10 year ago.(_;)
Stick with the plan. I always say to my mrs, if you've got cash you can buy whatever you like. X)



Edited By: OldEnglish on Sep 29, 2016 14:53
6 Likes
Putting money away used to be about being able to afford a home. Nowadays, anywhere south of Watford .means that's a pointless task.

Therefore, people now prize possessions greater; the latest mobile phone, the better brand of clothing, the to brag about holiday etc.

To put money away for a deposit was once an enticement. No longer.

To be in debt, so long as you're seen in the latest fashion, is acceptable.

Young people do not discuss extensions on their property, they discuss hair extensions, a phone contract extension.

Money in the bank to a young person is a lost opportunity to own a status symbol.

Property was once an aspiration and an enticement to prudence. We now live in a new paradigm.
6 Likes
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
coathanger
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
coathanger
For all those that were surprised by the Brexit vote, here's your answer.
How is leaving the EU going to enable you to have greater savings or purchase a property south of Watford?
Again, these are issues of personal responsibility.
...says the Banker.
You realise a person's profession isn't bequeathed upon them at birth.
It's like a chip on a shoulder or a sense of entitlement - it's something you work on over time.
Regardless, that doesn't answer the question of how you think Brexit will change things.
Stagnation of earnings now has a dramatic effect on people's earnings http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-37508968

Stagnation of the stock market for 20yrs., all whilst City Bankers bathe in their bonuses.

Why has peoples investments not risen in line with Bankers bonuses? Disgusting.

Why, after 20yrs, is the stock market at the exact same level? Abject failure of the economy to reward hard working people.

Low pay, low return on pension investments, inability to own a home, healthcare in crisis, it goes on and on. Yet you blame the poor for their inability to be wealthy.

Your head is so far in the sand it's up a kangaroo's backside.

All Comments

(62) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
Page:
4 Likes #1
I have invested in beanie babies, 50k to date, hoping to cash for my retirement.
2 Likes #2
Probably most people have less than a £100.00 disposable a week? how many of those 16 million are young people, most savers are a bit maturer!
11 Likes #3
I would say that it's not really 'less than £100 in savings', but that they have no savings at all. In a modern society where so many things are expensive, lots of people 'work to zero' each month, where every penny is accounted for, and nothing is left over. Just a sign of the times.
3 Likes #4
I got 17p in a isa ;):)
banned 11 Likes #5
I've always saved what I can from a young age and have built up a healthy little fund that I very rarely dip into.

Mind you I am a tight git, I've been told I squeak when I walk.
banned#6
davewave
I have invested in beanie babies, 50k to date, hoping to cash for my retirement.

Hope you don't have a fire X)
1 Like #7
MrScotchBonnet
I've always saved what I can from a young age and have built up a healthy little fund that I very rarely dip into.
Mind you I am a tight git, I've been told I squeak when I walk.

That's exactly what we've done over the years. I see some of our friends going on holidays several times a year, constantly eating out, buying the latest new gadget, and always having a new car. One day they'll realise they have no money.
I don't think I squeak et though.
2 Likes #8
Predikuesi
MrScotchBonnet
I've always saved what I can from a young age and have built up a healthy little fund that I very rarely dip into.
Mind you I am a tight git, I've been told I squeak when I walk.
That's exactly what we've done over the years. I see some of our friends going on holidays several times a year, constantly eating out, buying the latest new gadget, and always having a new car. One day they'll realise they have no money.
I don't think I squeak et though.

depends you don't know what type of pension / home equity they have etc. I think it would be a shame to look back and realise you have not enjoyed life as much as you can at any age. As long as you are happy in life then your are doing it right.
3 Likes #9
ibblackberry1
Predikuesi
MrScotchBonnet
I've always saved what I can from a young age and have built up a healthy little fund that I very rarely dip into.
Mind you I am a tight git, I've been told I squeak when I walk.
That's exactly what we've done over the years. I see some of our friends going on holidays several times a year, constantly eating out, buying the latest new gadget, and always having a new car. One day they'll realise they have no money.
I don't think I squeak et though.
depends you don't know what type of pension / home equity they have etc. I think it would be a shame to look back and realise you have not enjoyed life as much as you can at any age. As long as you are happy in life then your are doing it right.

There is hardly any security in that these days. You need something that transcends the happiness and fickle security money appears to offer. Contentment is a far more important disposition to have, though there are always those who will rob you of that too.
7 Likes #10
Predikuesi
MrScotchBonnet
I've always saved what I can from a young age and have built up a healthy little fund that I very rarely dip into.
Mind you I am a tight git, I've been told I squeak when I walk.
That's exactly what we've done over the years. I see some of our friends going on holidays several times a year, constantly eating out, buying the latest new gadget, and always having a new car. One day they'll realise they have no money.
I don't think I squeak et though.
Trouble with material things like new cars, the latest gadget ect.... You find the novelty soon wears off & there's always something else new just around the corner, then your left paying for it for the next god knows how many years.
A lot of friends i know have split up with their partners because they're constantly skint at the end of each month & argue over never having any money to do anything. The same people funnily enough who were having brand new cars, two holidays a year all the latest gadgets 10 year ago.(_;)
Stick with the plan. I always say to my mrs, if you've got cash you can buy whatever you like. X)



Edited By: OldEnglish on Sep 29, 2016 14:53
1 Like #11
I did, but now im £49 overdrawn :D
1 Like #12
I would be interested to see, of those who have less than £100 savings how many:

a) have investment elsewhere (property, stocks etc.)
b) have the latest iphone, ipad, BMW on the drive etc.
c) have children living at home
d) all the above
5 Likes #13
Blow it all and live off the state. You only get penalized for having savings and being financially prudent.

Just make sure to blow it all (including the house) by the time you retire or the state will just take it off you as reward for the many years you have contributed.

You'll be far happier if you do. We're not here for a long time so make some good memories.
1 Like #14
haritori
Probably most people have less than a £100.00 disposable a week? how many of those 16 million are young people, most savers are a bit maturer!
I know someone who is 50+ and thousands in debt
never mind the young folks
2 Likes #15
Apparently the average household savings in the UK is £500! Hukd members are actually affluent in comparison with the average as this site attracts people with money to spend. They just want to spend on bargains, but they have money to spend nonetheless.
1 Like #16
For all those that were surprised by the Brexit vote, here's your answer.
#17
coathanger
For all those that were surprised by the Brexit vote, here's your answer.
Landlords renting out to European migrants saves by snapping up more properties with savings rather than earn 0.1% interest. Landlords make up 6% of UK households earning money from renting out properties. Then there are those with offshoring savings and investments, plus those Europeans who work here savings in Euros.
2 Likes #18
Classes in Money Management should take place in School.

I know so many younger people who live from **** to ****, and if they have any money left over, they just spend all they can for no real reason until it has all gone.



EDIT - why is the word p ay ch eck edited by UKHD swear filter??

Edited By: Chiptivo on Sep 29, 2016 22:33
4 Likes #19
And it's still more than what the government have in their account!
#20
Predikuesi
MrScotchBonnet
I've always saved what I can from a young age and have built up a healthy little fund that I very rarely dip into.
Mind you I am a tight git, I've been told I squeak when I walk.
That's exactly what we've done over the years. I see some of our friends going on holidays several times a year, constantly eating out, buying the latest new gadget, and always having a new car. One day they'll realise they have no money.
I don't think I squeak et though.

my m8 did that got knocked of his bike 3 yrs ago, car was a waste of money he said I can bike to work, well atleast his 80yr old house bound mam has plenty of money now
2 Likes #21
My neighbor would not spend a penny if he can help it, now many on here are careful with money but this guy can put you all to shame, and he has lost lots of friends because of it, he has loads of money in the bank, but it does not keep him warm, heating never above 15c, cheap food........ but when he dies his estate will be well over £1.5m

but I say enjoy yourself, one of the things that propper windes my up into a rage is greedy ppl but I have a special rage for greedy old ppl how long do the F think they are going to live?

When I die I will have a very small amount in saving and a house, enough to give a few relatives a good sum
#22
miles136
Predikuesi
MrScotchBonnet
I've always saved what I can from a young age and have built up a healthy little fund that I very rarely dip into.
Mind you I am a tight git, I've been told I squeak when I walk.
That's exactly what we've done over the years. I see some of our friends going on holidays several times a year, constantly eating out, buying the latest new gadget, and always having a new car. One day they'll realise they have no money.
I don't think I squeak et though.
my m8 did that got knocked of his bike 3 yrs ago, car was a waste of money he said I can bike to work, well atleast his 80yr old house bound mam has plenty of money now

miles136
My neighbor would not spend a penny if he can help it, now many on here are careful with money but this guy can put you all to shame, and he has lost lots of friends because of it, he has loads of money in the bank, but it does not keep him warm, heating never above 15c, cheap food........ but when he dies his estate will be well over £1.5m
but I say enjoy yourself, one of the things that propper windes my up into a rage is greedy ppl but I have a special rage for greedy old ppl how long do the F think they are going to live?
When I die I will have a very small amount in saving and a house, enough to give a few relatives a good sum

I think everyone has the right to use their own (earned) money as they please, but if it is wasted during younger days, they have no one to blame but themselves if they have a hard time when they're older.
My wife and I have saved leftover money each month for a reason. We have not lived like misers, but lived sensibly. We, apart from the mortgage, which we paid off a few years ago, have never owed a penny to anyone or bought anything on credit. We are moving soon, so have enough money to add to the sale of our house to buy something better suited to our needs. Our house is a three storey Victorian terraced property, which was easier to maintain in our younger days. Without savings we couldn't even dream to move.
Our next door neighbour told me a while ago that she has put £350k into her house. She wants to move too, but can't understand why she won't get much more than £180,000 (the top end of the sale price in our area). Overspend is never clever!
Both extremes (excessive spenders and misers) is foolishness in my opinion. Both might like to have a load of money, but they would not wisely handle it. Money rules both types of lives.
6 Likes #23
Putting money away used to be about being able to afford a home. Nowadays, anywhere south of Watford .means that's a pointless task.

Therefore, people now prize possessions greater; the latest mobile phone, the better brand of clothing, the to brag about holiday etc.

To put money away for a deposit was once an enticement. No longer.

To be in debt, so long as you're seen in the latest fashion, is acceptable.

Young people do not discuss extensions on their property, they discuss hair extensions, a phone contract extension.

Money in the bank to a young person is a lost opportunity to own a status symbol.

Property was once an aspiration and an enticement to prudence. We now live in a new paradigm.
#24
coathanger
For all those that were surprised by the Brexit vote, here's your answer.

How is leaving the EU going to enable you to have greater savings or purchase a property south of Watford?

Again, these are issues of personal responsibility.
#25
I lived in the time of 7 perc savings interest bank accounts.
No point saving today with .5 perc interest
Same with pensions

Edited By: lumsdot on Sep 30, 2016 08:17
1 Like #26
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
coathanger
For all those that were surprised by the Brexit vote, here's your answer.
How is leaving the EU going to enable you to have greater savings or purchase a property south of Watford?
Again, these are issues of personal responsibility.
...says the Banker.
#27
MrScotchBonnet
I've always saved what I can from a young age and have built up a healthy little fund that I very rarely dip into.
Mind you I am a tight git, I've been told I squeak when I walk.

Ha, I've been told I am somewhat similar except I am still young X)
#28
coathanger
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
coathanger
For all those that were surprised by the Brexit vote, here's your answer.
How is leaving the EU going to enable you to have greater savings or purchase a property south of Watford?
Again, these are issues of personal responsibility.
...says the Banker.

You realise a person's profession isn't bequeathed upon them at birth.

It's like a chip on a shoulder or a sense of entitlement - it's something you work on over time.

Regardless, that doesn't answer the question of how you think Brexit will change things.
#29
Does this take people with mortgages or debt into account? Lots of people might have over £100 in their account for a rainy day, but they could also be 1000s in debt.
6 Likes #30
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
coathanger
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
coathanger
For all those that were surprised by the Brexit vote, here's your answer.
How is leaving the EU going to enable you to have greater savings or purchase a property south of Watford?
Again, these are issues of personal responsibility.
...says the Banker.
You realise a person's profession isn't bequeathed upon them at birth.
It's like a chip on a shoulder or a sense of entitlement - it's something you work on over time.
Regardless, that doesn't answer the question of how you think Brexit will change things.
Stagnation of earnings now has a dramatic effect on people's earnings http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-37508968

Stagnation of the stock market for 20yrs., all whilst City Bankers bathe in their bonuses.

Why has peoples investments not risen in line with Bankers bonuses? Disgusting.

Why, after 20yrs, is the stock market at the exact same level? Abject failure of the economy to reward hard working people.

Low pay, low return on pension investments, inability to own a home, healthcare in crisis, it goes on and on. Yet you blame the poor for their inability to be wealthy.

Your head is so far in the sand it's up a kangaroo's backside.
1 Like #31
coathanger
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
coathanger
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
coathanger
For all those that were surprised by the Brexit vote, here's your answer.
How is leaving the EU going to enable you to have greater savings or purchase a property south of Watford?
Again, these are issues of personal responsibility.
...says the Banker.
You realise a person's profession isn't bequeathed upon them at birth.
It's like a chip on a shoulder or a sense of entitlement - it's something you work on over time.
Regardless, that doesn't answer the question of how you think Brexit will change things.
Stagnation of earnings now has a dramatic effect on people's earnings http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-37508968
Stagnation of the stock market for 20yrs., all whilst City Bankers bathe in their bonuses.
Why has peoples investments not risen in line with Bankers bonuses? Disgusting.
Why, after 20yrs, is the stock market at the exact same level? Abject failure of the economy to reward hard working people.
Low pay, low return on pension investments, inability to own a home, healthcare in crisis, it goes on and on. Yet you blame the poor for their inability to be wealthy.
Your head is so far in the sand it's up a kangaroo's backside.

So for the third time I'm going to ask how Brexit is going to remedy that, but not in the expectation that you'll answer it. I've tempered that.

The whole banker thing is something you've got to get over though. Not every banker is an amoral caricature. In fact many are hard-working people from modest backgrounds who work ridiculous hours and that's the reality that people don't want to hear sometimes. It's not a profession that discriminates on background. It's not even one that discriminates on education sometimes. I'm not going to say the whole industry is whiter than white but what I will say is that it rewards endeavour.

You're very quick to find excuses, to bemoan other things be it bankers, the EU, politicans, whatever. But you live in an age where opportunities are greater than ever. You have more information available to you than ever. If you have a great idea then funding is easier than ever. You even moan about your fellow workers and how materialistic they are, yet you don't see that as an opportunity to set yourself apart.

Here's the truth. There are people your age who aren't represented by stories like this. There are people your age who do own their own home, who do have good pension funds, who do have growing investments (that have grown because they pay attention to the markets) yet you don't want to recognise that. You'd rather think they're the beneficiaries of a rigged system when they're probably from a similar (or even worse off) background than you.

I don't blame the poor for their inability to be wealthy. Blaming other people is your thing.

Me, I just ask people to accept responsibility for themselves.
#32
lumsdot
I lived in the time of 7 perc savings interest bank accounts.
No point saving today with .5 perc interest
Same with pensions
I take your point regards savings, but pensions I must disagree, every £ pound you save costs a standard tax payer only 80p, the savings much greater for higher tax payers.
I have a small pension fund with Aviva which has actually sky rocketed since brexit.
1 Like #33
delusion
Does this take people with mortgages or debt into account? Lots of people might have over £100 in their account for a rainy day, but they could also be 1000s in debt.
This is exactly what I was thinking. Mortgage I don't think counts but any other kind of dept them I don't think a saving counts. I was always taught that having any sort of savings when your in dept is silly. Pay what you owe and then start to save.
I don't find the figure a shock at all when you take dept into account. I have zero saving because any spare money at the end of the month goes to clearing dept (talking car etc not to fund my drug addiction!) I don't think somebody who has 5k sat in a savings account can claim to have savings when they owe 10k on a car..
#34
Deaa
delusion
Does this take people with mortgages or debt into account? Lots of people might have over £100 in their account for a rainy day, but they could also be 1000s in debt.
This is exactly what I was thinking. Mortgage I don't think counts but any other kind of dept them I don't think a saving counts. I was always taught that having any sort of savings when your in dept is silly. Pay what you owe and then start to save.
I don't find the figure a shock at all when you take dept into account. I have zero saving because any spare money at the end of the month goes to clearing dept (talking car etc not to fund my drug addiction!) I don't think somebody who has 5k sat in a savings account can claim to have savings when they owe 10k on a car..

This depends largely on the type of debt. If you have debts on a credit card at 0%, the sensible thing is to pay the minimum each month whilst saving/investing where you can earn interest, since your standing debt is not costing you anything.
If you have debts on a finance agreement, it depends if there is a penalty for early payments or over payments. If so, it may be more savvy again to pay/invest.

You should also, where possible save an emergency fund to cover your costs for at least 3 months if you lost your ability to make money

So in general, the priority should be:
1. Make emergency fund
2. Pay down most expensive debts
3. Save if it earns more than you are paying to keep existing debts
4. Pay cheaper debts at the slowest pace to avoid penalties
1 Like #35
Predikuesi
MrScotchBonnet
I've always saved what I can from a young age and have built up a healthy little fund that I very rarely dip into.
Mind you I am a tight git, I've been told I squeak when I walk.
That's exactly what we've done over the years. I see some of our friends going on holidays several times a year, constantly eating out, buying the latest new gadget, and always having a new car. One day they'll realise they have no money.
I don't think I squeak et though.

not only not have money, but be in the red by a substantial sum.....

I pity the people who would rather have a new car than a rainy day fund.

Don't get me wrong, i'm not anti credit, I have credit cards and the like, i'm anti racking up thousands of unsustainable debt.

Edited By: eset12345 on Sep 30, 2016 17:47
2 Likes #36
I've always had a few grand in the bank even when I was on jsa, but the father of my child has always been about rewarding himself things because he earns it, its a strange mindset (not withstanding the fact I think he is currently suffering from depression or something and my life is pure hell because of it and getting worse all tne time) he was always like that, roof overhead and food on table are not enough he has to reward himself with things, not amazing things we are poor so its things like a ps4 game but still, I have never understood it when he has £200 in the bank, why he doesn't see paying rent and eating as earned if you see what I mean. Personally I'd be worried if I had less than 5k in the bank.

But then on the other hand you dont want too much in the bank, if you claim benefits of any kind there are cut off points that differ for each so you might as well buy that apple laptop instead of a standard one as your money is getting close to the cut off and that extra £100 in the bank will put your benefits down by 1k a year that sort of thing.

But then there's also a lot of people just plain struggling, food bank use is going up and up, people live paycheque to paycheque through no fault of there own.

Its all just the world we live in and its getting worse
5 Likes #37
Error440
I've always had a few grand in the bank even when I was on jsa, but the father of my child has always been about rewarding himself things because he earns it, its a strange mindset (not withstanding the fact I think he is currently suffering from depression or something and my life is pure hell because of it and getting worse all tne time) he was always like that, roof overhead and food on table are not enough he has to reward himself with things, not amazing things we are poor so its things like a ps4 game but still, I have never understood it when he has £200 in the bank, why he doesn't see paying rent and eating as earned if you see what I mean. Personally I'd be worried if I had less than 5k in the bank.
But then on the other hand you dont want too much in the bank, if you claim benefits of any kind there are cut off points that differ for each so you might as well buy that apple laptop instead of a standard one as your money is getting close to the cut off and that extra £100 in the bank will put your benefits down by 1k a year that sort of thing.
But then there's also a lot of people just plain struggling, food bank use is going up and up, people live paycheque to paycheque through no fault of there own.
Its all just the world we live in and its getting worse
Yes. Make sure you spend that extra cash you've got. Don't want to see your benefits cut.... oO
banned#38
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
coathanger
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
coathanger
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
coathanger
For all those that were surprised by the Brexit vote, here's your answer.
How is leaving the EU going to enable you to have greater savings or purchase a property south of Watford?
Again, these are issues of personal responsibility.
...says the Banker.
You realise a person's profession isn't bequeathed upon them at birth.
It's like a chip on a shoulder or a sense of entitlement - it's something you work on over time.
Regardless, that doesn't answer the question of how you think Brexit will change things.
Stagnation of earnings now has a dramatic effect on people's earnings http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-37508968
Stagnation of the stock market for 20yrs., all whilst City Bankers bathe in their bonuses.
Why has peoples investments not risen in line with Bankers bonuses? Disgusting.
Why, after 20yrs, is the stock market at the exact same level? Abject failure of the economy to reward hard working people.
Low pay, low return on pension investments, inability to own a home, healthcare in crisis, it goes on and on. Yet you blame the poor for their inability to be wealthy.
Your head is so far in the sand it's up a kangaroo's backside.
So for the third time I'm going to ask how Brexit is going to remedy that, but not in the expectation that you'll answer it. I've tempered that.
The whole banker thing is something you've got to get over though. Not every banker is an amoral caricature. In fact many are hard-working people from modest backgrounds who work ridiculous hours and that's the reality that people don't want to hear sometimes. It's not a profession that discriminates on background. It's not even one that discriminates on education sometimes. I'm not going to say the whole industry is whiter than white but what I will say is that it rewards endeavour.
You're very quick to find excuses, to bemoan other things be it bankers, the EU, politicans, whatever. But you live in an age where opportunities are greater than ever. You have more information available to you than ever. If you have a great idea then funding is easier than ever. You even moan about your fellow workers and how materialistic they are, yet you don't see that as an opportunity to set yourself apart.
Here's the truth. There are people your age who aren't represented by stories like this. There are people your age who do own their own home, who do have good pension funds, who do have growing investments (that have grown because they pay attention to the markets) yet you don't want to recognise that. You'd rather think they're the beneficiaries of a rigged system when they're probably from a similar (or even worse off) background than you.
I don't blame the poor for their inability to be wealthy. Blaming other people is your thing.
Me, I just ask people to accept responsibility for themselves.

But you would say that because time and time again it rewards failure and that's ugly.
#39
I envy you being able to afford Hipster Toast every day :p
lend me a hundred quid then i won't be one of these skint no hopers X)

Error440
I've always had a few grand in the bank even when I was on jsa, but the father of my child has always been about rewarding himself things because he earns it, its a strange mindset (not withstanding the fact I think he is currently suffering from depression or something and my life is pure hell because of it and getting worse all tne time) he was always like that, roof overhead and food on table are not enough he has to reward himself with things, not amazing things we are poor so its things like a ps4 game but still, I have never understood it when he has £200 in the bank, why he doesn't see paying rent and eating as earned if you see what I mean. Personally I'd be worried if I had less than 5k in the bank.
But then on the other hand you dont want too much in the bank, if you claim benefits of any kind there are cut off points that differ for each so you might as well buy that apple laptop instead of a standard one as your money is getting close to the cut off and that extra £100 in the bank will put your benefits down by 1k a year that sort of thing.
But then there's also a lot of people just plain struggling, food bank use is going up and up, people live paycheque to paycheque through no fault of there own.
Its all just the world we live in and its getting worse
#40
davewave
I have invested in beanie babies, 50k to date, hoping to cash for my retirement.
I got about 100 and am hoping to do this also :) Not. :p

Post a Comment

You don't need an account to leave a comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!