My employer wants me to use my own mobile for work - help! - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HUKD, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HUKD app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit

My employer wants me to use my own mobile for work - help!

joeymcjoe Avatar
6y, 4m agoPosted 6 years, 4 months ago
Hi everyone, I'm looking to hear from anyone who's employer, instead of giving you a work mobile, asks you to use your personal mobile for work and offers financial recompense. They are thinking about doing this at my workplace and I've got quite a few worries (that are shared with colleagues) which I could do with some help with.

I'm slightly worried that putting my personal number on the work database will lead to lots of calls when I'm not in working hours... as if I had a work mobile I could simply turn it off. Also, how much are you paid/what is the process for claiming back the cost of calls? I'm worried that going through my itemised bill line by line will take up lots of time, and I could potentially not want others to know what numbers I've been calling on a personal basis.

thanks in advance!
joeymcjoe Avatar
6y, 4m agoPosted 6 years, 4 months ago
Options

All Comments

(36) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
banned 1 Like #1
Buy an el cheapo second phone and get them to cover cost?
1 Like #2
buy a seperate work phone - simples. :)
1 Like #4
don't do it, end, less hassle and them stalling to pay your expenses, and how will that effect your free minutes when you can't show a cost? had this situation before, avoid
1 Like #5
Buy a "Pay As You Go" handset (with a dedicated number), or buy a "Follow Me" number & give that to your organisation.

The "Follow Me" service I have used for over 10 years asks for the caller's name & then calls a pre-defined number, or set of numbers in order, according to the time of day. For the subscription fee you are provided with a dedicated telephone number that you hand-out to all those you do not wish to know your personal number(s). It does not accept Short Message Service [SMS] text, but does accept Facsimile Transmission Fax] messages. If somebody rings me at 9am, for example, my mobile handset line rings first, then the call diverts to my home, but if somebody rings at 9pm, my home line rings in preference.

There is an announcement relaying the caller's name as they have spoken it & you can choose to accept or reject the call. Rejecting sends to the next pre-defined number in your schedule, or goes to voice-mail.

Alternatively, tell your workplace that you do not have a mobile telephone & if you are required to have one for business calls they should provide it.

Be careful with the personal tax implications with having a telephone for business use. If possible have two separate lines/handsets so that you can clearly demonstrate that you do not use the "company 'phone" for personal calls. If you do use a company-provided telephone for personal calls (no matter how minor) you will be liable to pay tax on it as a “benefit in kind” (or as if the amount paid for the line rental/handset has been taken as taxable salary).

BFN,

fp.
banned 1 Like #6
fanpages
Buy a "Pay As You Go" handset (with a dedicated number), or buy a "Follow Me" number & give that to your organisation.

The "Follow Me" service I have used for over 10 years asks for the caller's name & then calls a pre-defined number, or set of numbers in order, according to the time of day. For the subscription fee you are provided with a dedicated telephone number that you hand-out to all those you do not wish to know your personal number(s). It does not accept Short Message Service [SMS] text, but does accept Facsimile Transmission Fax] messages. If somebody rings me at 9am, for example, my mobile handset line rings first, then the call diverts to my home, but if somebody rings at 9pm, my home line rings in preference.

There is an announcement relaying the caller's name as they have spoken it & you can choose to accept or reject the call. Rejecting sends to the next pre-defined number in your schedule, or goes to voice-mail.

Alternatively, tell your workplace that you do not have a mobile telephone & if you are required to have for business calls they should provide it.

Be careful with the personal tax implications with having a telephone for business use. If possible have two separate lines/handsets so that you can clearly demonstrate that you do not use the "company 'phone" for personal calls. If you do use a company-provided telephone for personal calls (no matter how minor) you will be liable to pay tax on it.

BFN,

fp.


I've never paid tax on the company phones I've used that I've abused the hell out of for personal calls.
#7
It's a really bad idea, and you should probably give your boss a slap for even thinking it might be worth a second thought. What happens if your phone breaks, is lost or stolen, if you lose service on it for a day or two while switching contracts, etc? And legally, I'm not sure where things would stand, especially with regards to the Data Protection Act.
#8
...until H.M. Revenue & Customs catch up with you years later & back-date all the tax you owe.

BFN,

fp.
#9
Thanks for all of your responses, I hadn't even considered the impact of any inclusive minutes/texts. And the point about the follow me service looks like a really interesting one too... never thought about the tax implications either!

cheers!
#10
master_chief

I've never paid tax on the company phones I've used that I've abused the hell out of for personal calls.


I've always paid extra tax for having a work's phone.
#11
Another point you possibly have not considered is once your employer feels they can contact you on "their" mobile line you may find that your working day gets longer & contact is attempted whilst you are on holiday or at weekends.

The "Follow Me" service suggestion would help avoid "out of hours" calls.

If you ever leave your employment all you would do is cease the subscription to the service (and take out another subscription if you think the service is useful anyway). You would then not need to change your personal mobile number (to avoid all your ex-colleagues using it).

Nobody outside of my immediate family knows my mobile number… not even me as I never quote it to anybody! :)

I'm not looking to promote one service above another, but I obviously can recommend the one I use (as I have used it continuously for so long).

It was originally provided by Call Sciences, but they were taken over by (sorry, "partnered with") Yac Limited (part of j2 Global Communications) in 2008.

[ http://callsciences.co.uk ]

A link to "Yac Number - Frequently Asked Questions".

I would gain a referral fee if I wished it; but I am not seeking to do this.

Other service providers are available.

BFN,

fp.
banned#12
midlandscomics
master_chief

I've never paid tax on the company phones I've used that I've abused the hell out of for personal calls.


I've always paid extra tax for having a work's phone.


Really? Perhaps some companies employ better accountants than others?
#13
fanpages
...until H.M. Revenue & Customs catch up with you years later & back-date all the tax you owe.BFN,fp.
ethically i should not say this, but for anything under £500 they would not bat an eyelid

Edited By: ivegotalobon on Aug 05, 2010 15:24: .
#14
master_chief
midlandscomics
master_chief
I've never paid tax on the company phones I've used that I've abused the hell out of for personal calls.
I've always paid extra tax for having a work's phone.
Really? Perhaps some companies employ better accountants than others?
It is nothing to do with the companies accountants. It is your responsibility to declare any benefits in kind.
#15
ivegotalobon
master_chief
midlandscomics
master_chief
I've never paid tax on the company phones I've used that I've abused the hell out of for personal calls.
I've always paid extra tax for having a work's phone.
Really? Perhaps some companies employ better accountants than others?

It is nothing to do with the companies accountants. It is your responsibility to declare any benefits in kind.


whats the benefit of being called up at any hour? I have a work mobile and don't pay any Tax and I work for the biggest employer in Europe..................
#16
Alfonse


whats the benefit of being called up at any hour? I have a work mobile and don't pay any Tax and I work for the biggest employer in Europe..................


McDonalds ?? oO;)
banned#17
ivegotalobon
master_chief
midlandscomics
master_chief
I've never paid tax on the company phones I've used that I've abused the hell out of for personal calls.
I've always paid extra tax for having a work's phone.
Really? Perhaps some companies employ better accountants than others?

It is nothing to do with the companies accountants. It is your responsibility to declare any benefits in kind.


So technically I should be paying tax on all personal calls made through a company phone but it would be near impossible to police such a policy?

Edited By: master_chief on Aug 05, 2010 15:37: .
banned#18
Just checked with a few various people I know with company phones and they've never paid tax on theirs either. My partner doesn't pay it on hers either.

The poor tax man.
#19
Yep, you should be paying tax on your usage.

A lot of people don't declare it and if you see my earlier post, anything under £500 they wouldn't even try to chase

It's like a company car, you get taxed to hell for them

Edited By: ivegotalobon on Aug 05, 2010 15:41: .
banned#20
ivegotalobon
Yep, you should be paying tax on your usage.

A lot of people don't declare it and if you see my earlier post, anything under £500 they wouldn't even try to chase


They wouldn't even let me see my itemised bill in my last job but correct protocol would be to get the bill and go through it with a tooth comb and pick out the personal calls then declare them in a separate tax form? What if your company gets inclusive minutes?

I can see why very few people do it.
#21
Tax man is to busy with Pompey at the moment they'll just add it to their bill lol
#22
master_chief
ivegotalobon
Yep, you should be paying tax on your usage.A lot of people don't declare it and if you see my earlier post, anything under £500 they wouldn't even try to chase
They wouldn't even let me see my itemised bill in my last job but correct protocol would be to get the bill and go through it with a tooth comb and pick out the personal calls then declare them in a separate tax form? What if your company gets inclusive minutes?I can see why very few people do it.

Company phones aren't too much of a problem, the £ in tax are so small. It has only been brought up in this thread because you should be declaring it, but many don't.

It is when you have a company car, where it could cost you a few k a year in tax.

Edit: to do with the inclusive minutes, you would be benefiting from any inclusive minutes, therefore they are taxable at the applicable rate. If you use the minutes which go down as 'free', then the company can't use them and will then get charged for any subsequent minutes, resulting in cost to the company which would have been free.

Edited By: ivegotalobon on Aug 05, 2010 15:51: .
banned#23
ivegotalobon
master_chief
ivegotalobon
Yep, you should be paying tax on your usage.A lot of people don't declare it and if you see my earlier post, anything under £500 they wouldn't even try to chase
They wouldn't even let me see my itemised bill in my last job but correct protocol would be to get the bill and go through it with a tooth comb and pick out the personal calls then declare them in a separate tax form? What if your company gets inclusive minutes?I can see why very few people do it.


Company phones aren't too much of a problem, the £ in tax are so small. It has only been brought up in this thread because you should be declaring it, but many don't.

It is when you have a company car, where it could cost you a few k a year in tax.


My partner never paid a penny in tax on her company Lexus either.
#24
master_chief
ivegotalobon
master_chief
ivegotalobon
Yep, you should be paying tax on your usage.A lot of people don't declare it and if you see my earlier post, anything under £500 they wouldn't even try to chase
They wouldn't even let me see my itemised bill in my last job but correct protocol would be to get the bill and go through it with a tooth comb and pick out the personal calls then declare them in a separate tax form? What if your company gets inclusive minutes?I can see why very few people do it.
Company phones aren't too much of a problem, the £ in tax are so small. It has only been brought up in this thread because you should be declaring it, but many don't.It is when you have a company car, where it could cost you a few k a year in tax.
My partner never paid a penny in tax on her company Lexus either.

I wouldn't shout that out mate. She could be owing thousands in tax for a Lexus.
#25
Off the top of my head, say the car list value is £20000, even if she pays for her own fuel etc there are quite a few variables. In 1 year she would owe nearly 2k in tax

Edited By: ivegotalobon on Aug 05, 2010 16:05: .
1 Like #26
Get work to buy a cheapo phone & give it to you to use. Refuse point blank to give them your phone number.

I refuse to give work my number - if they want me to be available by phone (for standby, or call out) then they give me a phone to use. Others in the office have used their own phones & now get no end of phone calls when they're on hols or at the weekend.
1 Like #27
Get a separate phone. They will bug you at every opportunity otherwise, 24/7 while your on holiday/sick, asking you to come back to work etc etc
banned#28
ivegotalobon
Off the top of my head, say the car list value is £20000, even if she pays for her own fuel etc there are quite a few variables. In 1 year she would owe nearly 2k in tax


She doesn't owe a penny in tax on it.
1 Like #29
Other options to avoid going through an itemised bill:

Charge your organisation a fee per minute for every business call you make from your mobile. Don't take the mickey, but do make it worth your while so that if you are spending half of your minutes per month on business calls the amount you are charging as expenses (payable within 30 days of your submission) covers your entire monthly line rental fee.

Or, ask the Company to pay for your insurance per month & you will pay for the calls (to up a certain amount; say £10 per month... or whatever monthly insurance costs would be for your handset). You can then just use your free minutes (if applicable) or increase your monthly tariff to provide a range of inclusive minutes that will cover the business calls.

...

PS. Why are you being asked to provide your handset/number for business calls? Has your position changed & you now need to be using a mobile telephone? If so, your contract of employment may also need to change if you are expected to provide your own materials to undertaken the role. If that is the case, ask for an increase in your annual salary to cover the cost of the line rental/calls over a 12 month period.

If you have already provided a contact number to some members of your organisation (for whatever reason) I would be tempted to use your existing handset as the "Company" one & buy yourself either a new handset/line or a second line for the same handset (if your service provide supports this). You can then opt to just switch off the "Company" handset (or line) when you do not wish to be contacted.

You'll obviously have to provide your new telephone number to your contacts that you wish to have your "personal" line, but at least that would ensure that everybody who currently knows (or can obtain) your mobile number is not informed of your "personal" line without your consent. Once you provide a contact number to anybody in your organisation, irrespective of how they adopt the Data Protection Act, somebody will write it down or print it out & stick it by their desk for everybody to see it.


If you did not have a mobile telephone already what would you be asked to do? Buy a handset solely for the pursuit of your employer’s business?

I do not wish to alarm you, but I am wondering if your employer is thinking that they do not wish to expose themselves to the risk of tens of starting mobile telephone contracts for the respective employees as they do not wish to tie themselves into 12 (or longer) month contracts. They may not be able to pass the credit check to do this, or they may think that business tariffs are too expensive to consider (and/or the business contract expects the organisation to purchase a new range of handsets as well).

Either way, I would be tempted to ask why this is necessary & what other options are available to you/them.

Perhaps relaying what your business entails or what your position involves may help others provide further suggestions.

BFN,

fp.
#30
ivegotalobon
Off the top of my head, say the car list value is £20000, even if she pays for her own fuel etc there are quite a few variables. In 1 year she would owe nearly 2k in tax

master_chief
She doesn't owe a penny in tax on it.

You've obviously found a loophole the rest of us are not aware of then.

As this is a car, not a van, is the car considered a "pool car" & is it returned to her place of employment every evening?

Is she a Director of the Company?

Is the vehicle mentioned on her tax return &/or Notification of Tax Code form?

BFN,

fp.
#31
master_chief
She doesn't owe a penny in tax on it.
How are you sure she doesn't owe a penny in tax on it?

Either she has been declaring the company car as a benefit in kind and as a result paying tax
or she is committing tax evasion, if she knows it or not. Ignorance is not an excuse to the taxman

I do hope it is the former
#32
Thanks everyone - let's hope HMRC don't turn their attention to this thread now that they're done with Pompey!
banned#33
tell em to sod off, that jus daft cuz thts ur phne u use outside tut work! u dnt want business calls in yer persnal time
banned#34
Probably 75% of my calls are work related on my personal phone, but I cant complain because it was my choice not to have a company one (as I didnt want to carry 2 phones around with me.) Makes a mockery of that reason now - as I have 3 with me each day - and not one belows to my company!)

If you are using it though as a business tool, then there should be no reason you cant claim it back on expenses.
#35
guv
Probably 75% of my calls are work related on my personal phone, but I cant complain because it was my choice not to have a company one (as I didnt want to carry 2 phones around with me.) Makes a mockery of that reason now - as I have 3 with me each day - and not one belows to my company!)If you are using it though as a business tool, then there should be no reason you cant claim it back on expenses.

There has been nothing to indicate he wouldn't be able to claim back through expenses, he actually says they would pay for it :|
banned#36
ivegotalobon
There has been nothing to indicate he wouldn't be able to claim back through expenses, he actually says they would pay for it :|

So what part of what I'd said are you actually disagreeing with? oO

Post a Comment

You don't need an account to leave a comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!