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My first encounter with the NHS

£0.00 @ NHS
Today I dislocated my shoulder playing football and it's the first time in 22 years I've been to a hospital since I was born. Probably the most painful thing I have ever experienced (the dislocation t… Read More
JimmyW Avatar
9y, 4m agoPosted 9 years, 4 months ago
Today I dislocated my shoulder playing football and it's the first time in 22 years I've been to a hospital since I was born. Probably the most painful thing I have ever experienced (the dislocation though the NHS are not far off) but I couldn't believe they made me wait for 6 hours in agony trying to prop my arm up with my right hand with no pain killers or anything. Don't get me wrong the nurses and the doctor were great (the nurse managed to pull a few strings in the end or it would have been longer!) but it seemed they never had a cubicle and a bed free at the same time. To top it all off I've got to wear a sling and can't do any physical activity for 6 weeks :( funny thing was, there were about 10 of us in there in footy kits and boots (I guess they get this a lot on sunday mornings!) okay mini one handed rant over, please feel free to add any similar experiences.
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JimmyW Avatar
9y, 4m agoPosted 9 years, 4 months ago
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#1
i actually found they were fab. well econd time round they were. i dislocated my knee kickboxing, ouch i agree the worst pain ever and i have two children.
first time doc said its fine a sprain threw a bandage my way and said take some of your mums co-codamol.

then because it was unstable i fell down the stairs 4 days later, well that time i got the works morphine, bed, splint, crutches ans mri scan. sadly showed i tore my cruciate ligaments so no more kick boxing for me.
jennie
#2
Just thank you're lucky stars you had insurance.
Oh wait, that's America!

:)
#3
ouch! I did say to the nurse I bet child birth isn't a patch on this :roll: but yeah, thought I wouldn't repeat that, was only kidding :whistling: but sounds like yours was much worse, they gave me the full works was hooked up to a heart monitor and had oxygen etc - thought it was just a case of go in, they give my arm a pull and go home!
#4
So sorry to hear of your painful experience, both the injury and the hospital wait, and i hope you get well soon.

I have sat in A&E with my son who was eight yrs old at the time for four hours waiting to be seen after he was hit full in the face with a baseball bat (yes they were actually playing baseball at the time!).As you can imagine he was in a LOT of pain and distress. I rushed him there in a taxi with just a cold pack over his eye which had swollen shut and was turning black and blue. We were then made to sit all that time with my young son in pain, not knowing if he had broken the bones around his eye or even damaged the eye itself, while f*****g brainless idiot morons had their kids with nothing wrong with them seen first. A two yr old that was doing singing and dancing around the place was seen in 20 mins becaue the mother said the child had a temperature...It was entirely down to those idiots who are allowed to skip the queue if the child has a temperature, that we had to wait so long. Two kids were throwing up and were seen too, clearly just had vomiting bugs. I mean, do parents not have brains or sense nowadays? lol.

My son wasnt allowed any pain relief in all that time. In my haste to get him to hospital i hadnt thought of medicine before we left. Can you imagine as an adult having a baseball full in your face and being left with no pain relief. When the coolpack which I took went warm after about half an hour they didnt even have one we could use in the hospital. Its atrocious, they need to get it sorted. And the type of people who take their kids up for a sniffle or a slight tempereature or because they just started throwing up, need to be noted down and either fined or forced into education as parents to stop bottle necking the hospitals for the real patients.

My son was eventually seen at midnight and was told they THOUGHT he hadnt broken anything but until the swelling went down they couldnt do anything to check it. I was given an appointment for FOUR days later at a facial out patients clinic at a hospital at the other end of the city. When I went there he was seen promptly and the doctors said it was THE first ever baseball bat injury they'd seen actually inflicted whilst playing baseball. He hadnt broken any bones luckily but had a lot of swelling and bruising andpain for a couple of weeks.

Another time I had to wait nearly four hours in A&E with complicated pneumonia, pleurisy and fluid on my lung, after my doctor had sent me along as an Emergency with a letter saying I wasnt fit to sit in A&E waiting. When I did eventually get taken into the dept, it was curtained off areas, and a drunk man kept staggering into my area, instead of the one next door where his pal wouldnt tell the doctor if he'd taken a drug overdose or not. Then the nurse had the cheek to get nippy with me when I refused to take all my top half clothing off for an ECG..... Nightmare.

I have other similar stories, but won't bore you any more! The NHS accident and emergency departments are seriously needing sorted out, time wasters should be fined, and the staff need to get basic equipment such as cold compresses and basic first aid stuff to aid patients while they are forced to wait.
#5
momagic
Just thank you're lucky stars you had insurance.
Oh wait, that's America!

:)


Yeah exactly, had you been in the good old US they wouldn't have made you wait 6 hours, they would have either shown you the door or charged you $5,000:whistling:
#6
Thanks a lot therealslimkaty, I imaging it must be 10 times worse when your made to wait with a child as you know how much pain they are in but feel helpless as there isn't much you can do about it to help them out - at least when it's you you can just grin and bare it I guess. I totally agree with your point though about people skipping the queue though, I didn't mind the numerous parents running in with children going in ahead of me since I knew I had only dislocated my shoulder, don't like to see someone waiting with their child obviously in pain sick with worry but one of the main reasons I had to wait so long was because a cubicle came available and I was just about to go when some bloke obviously drugged up to his eyeballs came in and took it, that made me pretty mad.
#7
Here's a little something that'll **** you off about the NHS.
I'm currently temping in a finance department of an ambulance service. This covers a very large area. 3 or 4 counties I think. Since I've been there I've seen some pretty astonishing things they spend their (OK "our") money on!

A few examples
One persons monthly mobile phone bill = almost £700
bill for putting a pair of windscreen wipers on a car = £118
Bill for putting a number plate on an ambulance = 70p for 2 screws. £135 for labour!
Repair of 1 squeeky chair. = 1 circlip @ 30p and £120 labour (to fix a £45 chair!!)


Happy days
#8
If it makes you feel better i have sat for hours in the States with an injury also, then was charged (but never paid) $2000. Being from the America originally, i have a deep love for the NHS , imperfections and all.
#9
My oldest daughter(when she was 7 weeks old) was taking fits of struggling to breath and turning blue just about every half an hour, for 9 days we went to the doctors and the A&E several times a day and were put down as overbearing parents as when we were there she never had a fit, however on our last emergency appointment (which we had to fight for) luckily she took a fit JUST before the doctor was about to send us away. She was was then rushed to hospitel and diagnosed with Whooping cough, her oxygen levels dropped to 3% whilst having these fits and we were told that she only had 20 mins left to live, her father being catholic called the priest to have her blessed and he was there within 10 mins, Luckily she gradually improoved and all was well, but a parent KNOWS when something is not right with their child.

on a lighter note, the same daughter fell when she was about 2 and a half and went to get her head glued, once the glue was put on the doctor was explaining to her dad (whilst constantly hearing "Daddy daddy daddy in the back ground) that she must not touch it as it's still wet. as hubby had been telling daughter, just a min the doctor is talking, she eventually said " stuck daddy stuck" ... yep her hand had got stuck to her head....
#10
Having worked (although temporarily a few years ago) for the NHS I believe that most of the staff try their best. People are triaged to decide who is seen when. Although it may seem that someone is fine they have to take account of their symptoms. A child may 'clearly just have a vomitting bug' but the NHS can't necessarily decide at that point if it is a bug or something more serious like meningitis. No one likes sitting in A&E so won't go unless they are worried. Doctors very rarely come out so what are people to do if they are worried. It is getting better now, my local A&E department now have a doctor there who can see none emergency patients quickly. I took my 6 month old daughter recently with an ear infection.
This post is really just to say just think of the reasons why people may be jumping the queue, what symptoms people have may be hiding something more serious so staff have to be cautious,
#11
- A doctor friend told me: If you want to be seen quickly in any A&E department, you go straight to the front if you say you have chest pains...

- Although misery loves company and we enjoy making ourselves feel better about the NHS by caricaturing the US system, remember that if your house burned down and you didn't have house insurance that would involve a big bill too. People in the US who pay for health insurance pay less for it than we pay for the NHS through our taxes - I had reason to spend a while looking into the relative costs last year. If people who pay tax here understood exactly how many thousands each year are going towards the NHS, they'd be amazed at the quality of private cover they could afford for the same amount (or, actually, less)................ None of the systems are perfect - ours is not less imperfect than anyone else's.
#12
When you're waiting in A & E & are in pain, every minute will drag. When you've got a sick child, you're even more worried, but so are other parents there with their children even if they don't show it (maybe because they don't want to frighten their children). For instance, those children who were vomiting - they may have just had a vomiting bug, but it's just as possible that they could have swallowed something that was making them sick. If they'd swallowed a liquid such as bleach for instance, there comes a point where treatment won't help because the internal organs will be so severely damaged that they can't recover. It's therefore perfectly reasonable that a vomiting child will be seen before one that doesn't have a gaping wound pouring with blood, even though their pain is causing you & them distress. And pain relief can't always be given, because it could mask other symptoms.

It's the triage nurse's job to do the initial assessment & prioritise the patients, not the job of those in the waiting area. :) I understand your annoyance, but I'm trying to be voice of reason here. NHS staff can't always get it right enough to satisfy all the patients, & your position in the queue could change if other people arrive who are deemed to be in more urgent need. I've waited several hours in A & E for treatment myself, but I also work in a hospital, so perhaps I can see things a bit more objectively. :)
#13
gobofraggle
- A doctor friend told me: If you want to be seen quickly in any A&E department, you go straight to the front if you say you have chest pains...

- Although misery loves company and we enjoy making ourselves feel better about the NHS by caricaturing the US system, remember that if your house burned down and you didn't have house insurance that would involve a big bill too. People in the US who pay for health insurance pay less for it than we pay for the NHS through our taxes - I had reason to spend a while looking into the relative costs last year. If people who pay tax here understood exactly how many thousands each year are going towards the NHS, they'd be amazed at the quality of private cover they could afford for the same amount (or, actually, less)................ None of the systems are perfect - ours is not less imperfect than anyone else's.


Out of interest, have you seen Micky Moores film 'Sicko'? Quite an interesting watch. I'm so glad i'm not living in the US.
#14
Shengis;1540125
Out of interest, have you seen Micky Moores film 'Sicko'? Quite an interesting watch. I'm so glad i'm not living in the US.

I've seen it. If more people watched it, maybe they'd be more grateful for the UK system. It's not a perfect system (no system is), but it allows you to get treated without your insurance status or bank balance being an issue on a checklist. Give me the NHS including its problems any day of the week over a system that could make me decide between which finger to have re-attached because of the cost implications, as happened to a man in Sicko who'd got his hand trapped in machinery. He didn't have medical insurance, so had to choose the digit he could afford. Compare a few hours of waiting with potential permanent disability purely because of your finances, & you'll see just how impatient & unappreciative some people have become. Nurses usually try to do their best within the system they have to work in.
#15
[quote=therealslimkaty;1539978] while f*****g brainless idiot morons had their kids with nothing wrong with them seen first. A two yr old that was doing singing and dancing around the place was seen in 20 mins becaue the mother said the child had a temperature...It was entirely down to those idiots who are allowed to skip the queue if the child has a temperature, that we had to wait so long. Two kids were throwing up and were seen too, clearly just had vomiting bugs. I mean, do parents not have brains or sense nowadays? lol.

................... Its atrocious, they need to get it sorted. And the type of people who take their kids up for a sniffle or a slight tempereature or because they just started throwing up, need to be noted down and either fined or forced into education as parents to stop bottle necking the hospitals for the real patients.


don't blame the parents!!!!!!!!!!!!! (not all of them anyway) in my own personal experience with under two's when you phone up to get a doctors appointment if your toddler is under the weather (temp, lethargic etc.) you usually have to fight with the person on the phone not to send out an ambulance.......and whatever happens they insist on you coming to a&e now this may be because we live 5 mins from and we obviously help with ambulance response times however in my opinion its not parents who bottleneck hospitals .............its meningitis.........and unfortuantly you can look like theres nothing wrong with you and have meningitis (happen to friends of mine)
#16
My only encounter for myself with the NHS was when I high sided my ZX6r. The first response took 40 minutes to get to me and the ambulance an hour. I knew I had broken my collar bone as it was poking out at a funny angle. Once I got to the hospital i had to wait 3 hours for an x-ray :x now the thing was while I was having my collar bone x-rayed the nurse twisted my arm a bit and it killed me. "Oh" she says. I think you have broken your radial head (elbow) :thumbsup: great. I asked her if she could x-ray it now. Oh no she said, you have to go back and tell them what I said and you will have to come back later. So I go back and tell them and sure enough I had to wait another 2 hours. When I got it x-rayed by the same girl, she tells me exactly what she said earlier. :x

Now this would of taken her another 5 minutes to of x-rayed my elbow, but no, I had to wait about all ****ing day.

I only just made it to my own Wedding party we was having that evening (we got married the week before in Jamaica) so the party was for family and friends who didn't come to Jamaica.
#17
i think the nhs can be a wonderful thing apart from the one time i had trouble, i have had a 100 good ones. i have two ill children both are tube fed and have been in and out of hospital a lot and they have always been treat well. we dont do a and e often with them as they get open access to the wards simply because some doctors dont have experience with gastrostomy tubes in children.
glad it isnt paid for or i wou dhave no money.
#18
I guess i've had good experiences with hospitals, the worst maybe a 40 minute wait.

It would be good if they had something similar to France where if you think you may need to go to hospital but aren't sure (things like abdominal pain), a doctor will come round in a little white car (like a mini ambulance) and give you an examination and call the ambulance if you need it. That way you wouldn't have people with simple flu clogging up the A&E.
banned#19
gobofraggle
- A doctor friend told me: If you want to be seen quickly in any A&E department, you go straight to the front if you say you have chest pains...
.


Hu and what about the people who actually do have chest pains? I don't think your comment is very well informed.
#20
Don't you mean the first time you've needed to go to a&e JimmyW? I think you'll find that you've been quite reliant on the NHS for your birth, neo-natal care, childhood check-ups, vaccinations, eye tests, dental treatment (well maybe not this one!:)) and so on. The demands on the NHS are enormous and we get frustrated, yes, at waiting but look at your replies and - things got sorted. Imagine the cost to the taxpayers to have enough staff of all types and beds and radiologists and ....... etc etc for the sunday morning influx of people who have had accidents at their chosen recreational sport. Do we need to all pay for this or do some of us put up with waiting in pain? Genuine questions - I'm not having a go at you personally. Cancer drug for a year to keep someone alive or another nurse in a&e for a year. Decisions that have to be made!!!
#21
[QUOTE=gobofraggle]- A doctor friend told me: If you want to be seen quickly in any A&E department, you go straight to the front if you say you have chest pains... QUOTE]


Not quite true in my case. Called NHS Direct first as I don't like to make a fuss, and they were on the verge of sending an ambulance round after going through my symptoms with them. I said I didn't want one and would take myself to A & E, and they said I would be seen straight away, have oxygen levels taken etc and put on a heart monitor to make sure everything was as it should be.

Got to A & E, my friend had to describe my symptoms as at the time as I was having another 'episode' (basically, I'd been in a garden centre and the pollen was really high and although I don't normally get hayfever/asthma, since I left there, my chest was getting really tight and I was physically struggling to breathe, struggling so much that I was getting dizzy just trying to breathe and it was getting incredibly painful and more difficult because of the pain) did all the check in things at the front and was told there was a 4 hour wait before I would be seen !!

Everyone was sat there looking at me as I was sat on the chairs with my head down, struggling to breathe, so in the end I wobbled up there and told them what NHS Direct had told me and told them to forget it as I couldn't sit there for 4 hours with my chest in so much pain and not being able to breathe properly, so I'd try and get my GP out and get an inhalor off him. Only when I said that did they get someone to look at me. Gave me the inhalor and the pain went almost straight away and my breathing was ok again about 20 mins later.

Don't even get me started on how useless they were when I was pregnant !! :x
#22
chesso
Don't you mean the first time you've needed to go to a&e JimmyW? I think you'll find that you've been quite reliant on the NHS for your birth, neo-natal care, childhood check-ups, vaccinations, eye tests, dental treatment (well maybe not this one!:)) and so on. The demands on the NHS are enormous and we get frustrated, yes, at waiting but look at your replies and - things got sorted. Imagine the cost to the taxpayers to have enough staff of all types and beds and radiologists and ....... etc etc for the sunday morning influx of people who have had accidents at their chosen recreational sport. Do we need to all pay for this or do some of us put up with waiting in pain? Genuine questions - I'm not having a go at you personally. Cancer drug for a year to keep someone alive or another nurse in a&e for a year. Decisions that have to be made!!!


well yeah, of course I'm talking about emergency treatment here - I'm a pretty patient person and wouldn't be bothered if I had to wait this long for a check-up/vaccination however much of an inconvenience it may be. As I say, my first visit to A&E and never realised you had to wait so long when your in a lot of discomfort, maybe a little naive but I thought they would at least give people pain killers if they had to sit there waiting all day.
#23
JimmyW
I thought they would at least give people pain killers if they had to sit there waiting all day.

Perhaps there was a good medical reason for no pain killers like it might react badly with an anaesthetic if you needed one. Sorry if I seemed a bit hard on you - (really my comments were not personal, I meant it:-D) - and I expect you were very nice and stoical and just put up with it but, honestly, the decisions that have to be made are bound to result in winners and losers.
Hope that the 6 weeks of sling etc doesn't drag too much and that your shoulder isn't painful now:friends:
#24
JimmyW
my first visit to A&E and never realised you had to wait so long.

If only you had arranged to play football at 02:30 on a Tuesday you'd have had no queue ;-) (that was the time of my last A+E visit).

If your hospital is anything like my local you have to ask for execises / physio yourself - if you don't ask you don't get.
My daughter had an operation on her wrist to try and cure minor pain caused by damaged cartiglage; eight weeks later the surgical unit wanted to sign her off completely (no more hospital visits) - even though she couldn't hold a pen and was in constant pain - we had to insist they refer her for physio and pain management (which is working wonders).
#25
just to let you know a patient we had through casulity was charged £170 for calling an ambulance for a non urgent mater. His shoulder had been hurting him for months so he thought the ambulance was a taxi. Please stop and think people before you call an ambulance because one day you might need it urgently and there will be none for the REAL emergencys. So this man learnt his lesson. Beware you will be charged for non urgent usage . Thats why it is called ACCIENDENT AND EMERGENCY.
banned#26
marshallka


I didn't know about the four hour rule until i read a week or two later that our hospital had made progess in the new rule and was seeing patients to that rule. What ****. Its madness. They do anything to make it look good on paper.
.


I had to wait 5 hours with a sliced minor artery between my thumb and wrist (its the artery that goes back to the heart), another time I had to go to sleep on the chairs in the reception with a broken hand till morning because no nurses were on??? (don't know what type of hospital it was), when I was in Belgium 5 minutes from entering the door and I was seen straight away, it seemed in front of everyone else. I think you have to pay towards your expenses there or something though I've got a bill for €48 that I've not paid in 5+ yrs, I've changed my name since so I'll be okay.
#27
Reading all of this I'm glad I'm not an injury prone sort of person!! I've had a few sports related injuries in the past but don't like to make a fuss so usually just get on with it and they sort themselves within a week or two, obviously couldn't do that this time but at least next time I'll know to think sod it and just let them score! :-D
#28
good luck with the MRSA and C Diff
#29
[COLOR="Blue"]If you saw the way that some of the staff get treated and what they get paid for the job then it makes you realise how difficult their job is.[/COLOR]
#30
mistymary
[COLOR="Blue"]If you saw the way that some of the staff get treated and what they get paid for the job then it makes you realise how difficult their job is.[/COLOR]


I know exactly what they get paid and how they are treated. I worked in hospitals for years, private and NHS, two sisters are nurses, one is a microbiologist, my mum was a matron and my dad a GP.

All we can expect staff to do is their job to the best of their ability, professionally, and making the correct, informed decisions on who comes first. Unfortunately I don't believe that always happens. I ended up on oxygen for a week in hospital with pneumonia and the nursing staff shot round doing the drugs then gathered in their little office the rest of the time while one nursing assistant went round making sure everyone was okay after that. There is a system whereby each patient has a "named nurse". Well I was never told who my named nurse was, the entire time I was there. No member of staff ever told me who they were, whether they were nurse, doctor, phlebotomist or whatever. I had to get out of my bed (which I wasnt supposed to do) to cover up the lady in the bed beside mine, who was dying, very old, and was in a hospital gown which wasnt even tied at the back. She was freezing cold. I tied the tyers on the back of her gown and put a blanket over her back. Nobody came near my four bedded ward for two hours at a time, regularly. That is unacceptable, and our ward was fully staffed. The elderly lady in the bed opposite mine had food put in front of her on several occasions, then taken away untouched. She was virtually unconscious and completely unaware that the food was being put there. She should have been fed by a member of staff, but nobody did, til I said something - they hadnt noticed... I wonder and worry that every day in hospitals all over the UK, patients are being similarly neglected. I know hospital staff dont have an easy job, but these particular staff in that ward were neglectful at best and I'm sure they are not an exception. I left hospital with the opinion that the expression nursing care was an oxymoron. My mother and sister, both nurses were disgusted at the level of "care".

I hope to God I don't end up back in hospital again, and if I do, I hope I have private medical insurance!
#31
JimmyW;1541177
....maybe a little naive but I thought they would at least give people pain killers if they had to sit there waiting all day.

Nurse/Doctor: "Where does it hurt?"
Patients: "No where, those pain killers are great!"
Pain is the body's way of telling you something isn't right, so masking it could hide some problems that may not be obvious from an examination.

Its easy to sit here fit and healthy and say that. If I was sitting in A&E in pain I'd be equally upset even if I could understand the reason why. In an ideal world we would walk in A&E and be seen immediately, but that is not practical in an unpredicatable world.
#32
therealslimkaty;1559474
I hope to God I don't end up back in hospital again, and if I do, I hope I have private medical insurance!


That private medical insurance what count for anything in an emergency though - immediate treatment will be handled by the NHS as few (if any?) private hospitals deal with A&E cases.
suspended#33
The 1st time i went to hospital was with a knee injury playing football.I tore my knee ligaments (all of them) & was put in a knee support & told it will all be well in a month.Several months later my knee kept locking up & complained for ages telling something is not right.3 years later my knee locks completely.Key hole surgery 6 months later unlocks it but pain is still there & still very weak.Complain still not right & very unstable but told all is ok.4 years later transferred from NHS to Bupa (paid for by NHS:)) & in under 2 weeks had xray,MRI scan & told need 3 1/2 hour operation to rebuild my knee.Had Operation in 2 months & after 9 months physio.Knee is much much better.

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