New network at home should I do anything with the old one? - HotUKDeals
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New network at home should I do anything with the old one?

Goofeys Girl Avatar
5y, 8m agoPosted 5 years, 8 months ago
Hi
The Title probably shows what an idiot I am already.
At home we have a network consisting of a main old PC and then wireless printer, 3 laptops and playstation etc.
Over the years this has caused us numerous problems probably due to me setting up incorrectly. The old PC is now not being used so I am going to set up a new netowrk with a new Router which I am going to put in the hallway as I have been advised this will speed up my internet a little. Everything else will be wifi.
Do I have to do anything to the laptops that are on the existing network before I unplug the router and get a new one before I start the new network. I can google how to make a network but cant find anything on what i should do with an old one. Once I have turned off the router does it simply not exist.
Finally can anyone recommend a good router. Our printer is an Epson and laptops are Samsung.
Yes I probably have now proved once and for all that I am an idiot.
Thanks
Goofeys Girl Avatar
5y, 8m agoPosted 5 years, 8 months ago
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#1
First, go for an "n" router as that will be faster than a "g" router if that is what you already have.

Basically, when you turn off the router the network then ceases to exist. You dont have to do anything to the laptops.

When you set up your new router you could try to give it the same name and password as the old router, so when the laptops are started up they may carry on as if nothing has happened.

If they object and say they cant find the old network then just get them to look for all wi fi networks and then find your new one and logon to it.

Edited By: guilbert53 on Apr 27, 2011 12:14
#2
guilbert53
First, go for an "n" router as that will be faster than a "g" router if that is what you already have.

Basically, when you turn off the router the network then ceases to exist. You dont have to do anything to the laptops.

When you set up your new router you could try to give it the same name and password as the old router, so when the laptops are started up they may carry on as if nothing has happened.

If they object and say they cant find the old network then just get them to look for all wi fi networks and then find your new one and logon to it.


you would need to check that all the client devices are 802.11n capable first as any device that uses 802.11g will drop it to that for all devices.

Edited By: Alfonse on Apr 27, 2011 12:16
#3
is n actually better than G even if a wireless G network has a full signal?
#4
KapA
is n actually better than G even if a wireless G network has a full signal?


its faster yes and works on both the 2.4Ghz and 5Ghz frequencies
#5
Thank you. Funnnily enough part of the problem in the past is that I cant remember my router password. Tried the default one and my various passwords. Needless to say now that I am learning a bit more I secretly write them down in an encrypted way which is always interesting when I have to fathom out what I have written down.
Thanks everyone.
banned 2 Likes #6
do you work for PSN?
#7
Alfonse
guilbert53
First, go for an "n" router as that will be faster than a "g" router if that is what you already have.

Basically, when you turn off the router the network then ceases to exist. You dont have to do anything to the laptops.

When you set up your new router you could try to give it the same name and password as the old router, so when the laptops are started up they may carry on as if nothing has happened.

If they object and say they cant find the old network then just get them to look for all wi fi networks and then find your new one and logon to it.


you would need to check that all the client devices are 802.11n capable first as any device that uses 802.11g will drop it to that for all devices.


Would appreciate some help. I do not know how to check they are capable. My laptops should be as all bought in the last year but not sure of my quite new but cheap printer.
Could someone look at this link please which should be
the epson site and the sx515w printer and tell me if it is 802.11n capable. Thank you.

http://www.epson.co.uk/Store/Printers-and-All-in-Ones/Epson-Stylus-SX515W/Tech-Specs



Edited By: Goofeys Girl on May 10, 2011 21:44

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