NHS being hit by large scale cyber attack today - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HotUKDeals, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HotUKDeals app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit

NHS being hit by large scale cyber attack today

£0.00 @ NHS
Yikes, not good oO (via The Guardian) A number of hospitals have been hit by a large scale cyber attack, NHS England has confirmed. Hospitals across the country appear to have been simultaneousl… Read More
msmyth Avatar
[mod] 1m, 2w agoPosted 1 month, 2 weeks ago
Yikes, not good oO(via The Guardian)

DyVwraJ.jpg?1

A number of hospitals have been hit by a large scale cyber attack, NHS England has confirmed.

Dn6m4nW.png

Hospitals across the country appear to have been simultaneously hit by a bug in their IT systems, leading to many diverting emergency patients. NHS England said it was aware of the problem and would release more details soon.

Meanwhile doctors have been posting on Twitter about what has been happening to their systems.

A screen grab of a instant message conversation circulated by one doctor says: “So our hospital is down … We got a message saying your computers are now under their control and pay a certain amount of money. And now everything is gone.”

East and North Hertfordshire NHS trust, one of the those affected, said in a statement: “Today (Friday, 12 May 2017), the trust has experienced a major IT problem, believed to be caused by a cyber attack.

“Immediately on discovery of the problem, the trust acted to protect its IT systems by shutting them down; it also meant that the trust’s telephone system is not able to accept incoming calls.

“The trust is postponing all non-urgent activity for today and is asking people not to come to A&E - please ring NHS111 for urgent medical advice or 999 if it is a life-threatening emergency.

“To ensure that all back-up processes and procedures were put in place quickly, the trust declared a major internal incident to make sure that patients already in the trust’s hospitals continued to receive the care they need.”
Other Links From NHS:
msmyth Avatar
[mod] 1m, 2w agoPosted 1 month, 2 weeks ago
Options

Top Comments

(5)
16 Likes
Many NHS Trusts are still running on Windows XP because there's no money (or expertise) for such a significant overhaul / modernisation of their IT systems. Thanks Jeremy you Hunt!
10 Likes
Utter scum. If they're based in the UK then I hope they're tracked down and get a life sentence.
9 Likes
groenleader
Not helped that Tony Blair and the Labour party wasted millions on an IT system that was then dumped, then the IT budget was left with nothing for a new system...Downloading Rkill and running it from the new task menu in task manager followed by Malwarebytes should probably solve the issue!


The man was in charge of the country 10-20yrs ago is somehow responsible!?! 10-20yrs is more than a lifetime in computing terms.

I'd have thought the Health Secretary at the present time would be a good place to start, even more so considering the amount he has slashed from the NHS budget.
8 Likes
groenleader
Not helped that Tony Blair and the Labour party wasted millions on an IT system that was then dumped, then the IT budget was left with nothing for a new system...Downloading Rkill and running it from the new task menu in task manager followed by Malwarebytes should probably solve the issue!


IT security budgets shouldn't be determined on what someone did or didn't do 10 years ago in office. NHS infrastructure is the complete opposite of "Strong and Stable" at the best of times, let alone today.
5 Likes
anyone tried turning it off, then on again.

All Comments

(92) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
Page:
#1
You can't hack a pen and a piece of paper. Everything should be backed up on a daily basis for such an occurrence to happen hackers aren't going to worry who their targeting as long as they get money.
10 Likes #2
Utter scum. If they're based in the UK then I hope they're tracked down and get a life sentence.
4 Likes #3
whoever did this should be locked up for a long long time, it's despicable, all those patients both emergency and other wise being affected by this is heart breaking

If caught throw the book at them and make an example for all
#4
If it was a normal business I would say let them delete it as there are back ups.

I doubt this to be the case here though.

Also, you'd have thought the NHS system would be one of the most encrypted around but clearly not.

Good job they didn't computerise the whole database to give the hackers access to all our medical records..... Oh balls.
3 Likes #5
Can't see hackers getting money out of the nhs , but seriously , how far down the food chain are these people to try and risk the lives of people in hospital with their stupidity. Just when you think you've seen it all :(
1 Like #6
Aren't these sort of things usually initiated by downloading or clicking an attachment in a dodgy email?

They might not have been targeted but rather just fallen for something most likely sent by a bot.

Unfortunately you can't always trust staff to be able to spot these sort of things before they occur without severely restricting their access (which may be needed for their job). They better have good back up systems in place otherwise this would be very worrying.
16 Likes #7
Many NHS Trusts are still running on Windows XP because there's no money (or expertise) for such a significant overhaul / modernisation of their IT systems. Thanks Jeremy you Hunt!
#8
Ah Crypto based attack. TBH they are **** easy to pick up these days unfortunately. Emails are a common vector of attack aka social engineering.

The folks that made it don't care who gets it, as long as they can get profit from it. Some versions have been broken by big IT but there is hundreds of versions out there.

Best you can do is lock down your user accounts as much as possible so that they cant access data to encrypt.
#9
delusion
Aren't these sort of things usually initiated by downloading or clicking an attachment in a dodgy email?
They might not have been targeted but rather just fallen for something most likely sent by a bot.
Unfortunately you can't always trust staff to be able to spot these sort of things before they occur without severely restricting their access (which may be needed for their job). They better have good back up systems in place otherwise this would be very worrying.

The image is only asking for $300 of bitcoin anyway.. So it'll be someone clicked on an attachment or gone on a webpage they shouldn't have and got a randomware... If it was a proper hacker asking for $300 then they are stupid.

The fun of one big centralised system if malware can get in...

I'd guess they don't back up all the data too often as the size of it must be outrageous


Edited By: winifer on May 12, 2017 16:09
[mod] 1 Like #10
winifer
delusion
Aren't these sort of things usually initiated by downloading or clicking an attachment in a dodgy email?
They might not have been targeted but rather just fallen for something most likely sent by a bot.
Unfortunately you can't always trust staff to be able to spot these sort of things before they occur without severely restricting their access (which may be needed for their job). They better have good back up systems in place otherwise this would be very worrying.
The image is only asking for $300 of bitcoin anyway.. So it'll be someone clicked on an attachment or gone on a webpage they shouldn't have and got a randomware... If it was a proper hacker asking for $300 then they are stupid

$300 per encrypted machine I'd imagine. Given how many computers there are on a health trusts network, it would add up to a pretty significant amount.
1 Like #11
Some idiot has run an infected file they got in an email and it will have spread to every document they have write access to. Someone opens one of those documents and either has bad security settings or enabled the code in them, that computer is now infected and more files will get infected.

Bitcoin isn't truly anonymous, with enough resources you could probably track that address the first time they spend them (especially if its on a physical product). I suspect though it would lead to someone in Russia and the trail would go cold given that Putin probably wouldn't be the most cooperative.
#12
chaywa
Many NHS Trusts are still running on Windows XP

..and interestingly if you google "Windows XP ransomware", the first non-advert link is this one from January 2017:
https://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/3002560/barts-health-nhs-trust-admits-its-windows-xp-pcs-have-been-infected-with-ransomware

The same trust have been hit today




Edited By: spoo on May 12, 2017 16:22
#13
Had stuff like this and can remove in dos type scan think was from macfee and was removed
#14
my sister is a nurse and had a message everything to be hand written .....
3 Likes #15
http://i68.tinypic.com/250jkv5.gif
Teresa may did it ;)
2 Likes #16
What total utter scumbags, Hope they find them and use whatever power they have to lock them up for a very very long time. Might have a few manslaughter cases should they find them.
2 Likes #17
Not helped that Tony Blair and the Labour party wasted millions on an IT system that was then dumped, then the IT budget was left with nothing for a new system...

Downloading Rkill and running it from the new task menu in task manager followed by Malwarebytes should probably solve the issue!
8 Likes #18
groenleader
Not helped that Tony Blair and the Labour party wasted millions on an IT system that was then dumped, then the IT budget was left with nothing for a new system...Downloading Rkill and running it from the new task menu in task manager followed by Malwarebytes should probably solve the issue!


IT security budgets shouldn't be determined on what someone did or didn't do 10 years ago in office. NHS infrastructure is the complete opposite of "Strong and Stable" at the best of times, let alone today.
#19
Towelie
If it was a normal business I would say let them delete it as there are back ups.
I doubt this to be the case here though.
Also, you'd have thought the NHS system would be one of the most encrypted around but clearly not.
Good job they didn't computerise the whole database to give the hackers access to all our medical records..... Oh balls.

Yes at the NHS everything we do is backed up, however you don't want the clinical risks associated with losing 10 minutes of data let alone half a day.
1 Like #20
stubluebird1927
Towelie
If it was a normal business I would say let them delete it as there are back ups.
I doubt this to be the case here though.
Also, you'd have thought the NHS system would be one of the most encrypted around but clearly not.
Good job they didn't computerise the whole database to give the hackers access to all our medical records..... Oh balls.
Yes at the NHS everything we do is backed up, however you don't want the clinical risks associated with losing 10 minutes of data let alone half a day.

Tbf I did think as soon as I had posted it that even one minutes data loss could be the difference between life and death for a number of people. Plus even it was live backup, the sheer amount of data would take a ridiculous amount of time to restore too so not an option, I now agree.
9 Likes #21
groenleader
Not helped that Tony Blair and the Labour party wasted millions on an IT system that was then dumped, then the IT budget was left with nothing for a new system...Downloading Rkill and running it from the new task menu in task manager followed by Malwarebytes should probably solve the issue!


The man was in charge of the country 10-20yrs ago is somehow responsible!?! 10-20yrs is more than a lifetime in computing terms.

I'd have thought the Health Secretary at the present time would be a good place to start, even more so considering the amount he has slashed from the NHS budget.
#22
Just install Malwarebytes, do a quick 'c' drive scan, delete quarantined malware, problem solved !
#23
Crypto variants have come a long way since a couple of years ago. I've recently overhauled our network at work to prevent this along with a detailed contingency plan. Apparently they'll take any admin rights along the way across the network both Lan and wan. Any cloud based backups will likely be encrypted too
1 Like #24
fes37
Just install Malwarebytes, do a quick 'c' drive scan, delete quarantined malware, problem solved !
Is malwarebytes picking up, and decrypting files caused by ransomware now then? It's not always that simple, especially on such a large scale...
#25
hawksface
fes37
Just install Malwarebytes, do a quick 'c' drive scan, delete quarantined malware, problem solved !
Is malwarebytes picking up, and decrypting files caused by ransomware now then? It's not always that simple, especially on such a large scale...
I know mate. Something as large scale and technical as an NHS IT system will require a more technical approach to remove the offending ransomware. The experts will be sure to sort it in good time before it becomes a major problem
#27
Of course things are backed up. Problem is it does take time to recover such large systems like those hospitals have. Meanwhile people need access to databases so then you get a traffic jam of requests on the phone to other centers.
#28
Seen this happen in schools as well before. Need to ensure you have complete working backups to restore data.
#29
Towelie
groenleader
Not helped that Tony Blair and the Labour party wasted millions on an IT system that was then dumped, then the IT budget was left with nothing for a new system...
Downloading Rkill and running it from the new task menu in task manager followed by Malwarebytes should probably solve the issue!
The man was in charge of the country 10-20yrs ago is somehow responsible!?! 10-20yrs is more than a lifetime in computing terms.
I'd have thought the Health Secretary at the present time would be a good place to start, even more so considering the amount he has slashed from the NHS budget.

LOLS. Its his fault we are in all this mess now!

Don't tell me! You had a Mondeo, tax credits benefit package and cant wait for more borrowing :D
#30
fes37
Just install Malwarebytes, do a quick 'c' drive scan, delete quarantined malware, problem solved !
"Ooops your files have been encrypted"

Oh dear, what shall we do? I know lets delete the program..

15 minutes later.....

Oh **** we just deleted the program that contains the decrpytor......

Epic X)
#31
The.Ghostbuster
You can't hack a pen and a piece of paper. Everything should be backed up on a daily basis for such an occurrence to happen hackers aren't going to worry who their targeting as long as they get money.

Do things like physical x-ray and scan results even exist any more?
#32
fes37
Just install Malwarebytes, do a quick 'c' drive scan, delete quarantined malware, problem solved !

You cannot decrypt these files without the key. It's why ransomware is so nasty.

The only way to get the key is to get it off of the malware author.
5 Likes #33
anyone tried turning it off, then on again.
1 Like #34
groenleader
Towelie
groenleader
Not helped that Tony Blair and the Labour party wasted millions on an IT system that was then dumped, then the IT budget was left with nothing for a new system...
Downloading Rkill and running it from the new task menu in task manager followed by Malwarebytes should probably solve the issue!
The man was in charge of the country 10-20yrs ago is somehow responsible!?! 10-20yrs is more than a lifetime in computing terms.
I'd have thought the Health Secretary at the present time would be a good place to start, even more so considering the amount he has slashed from the NHS budget.
LOLS. Its his fault we are in all this mess now!
Don't tell me! You had a Mondeo, tax credits benefit package and cant wait for more borrowing :D

Seriously mate, have you not read this forum over the past few days??

I'll ignore you awfully poor attempts at a personal insult though and attempt to keep the thread on track.

Why blame the man in charge 10-20 yrs ago? Even if he did implement some poor policies, successive governments have had 10yrs to fix it and done nothing about it? Surely they should also take some responsibility for sitting back and doing nothing since??

I don't really agree it is all Blair's fault but for the sake of this, let's just say it was but why have no governments done anything to fix his mess since?
#35
The.Ghostbuster
You can't hack a pen and a piece of paper. Everything should be backed up on a daily basis for such an occurrence to happen hackers aren't going to worry who their targeting as long as they get money.

Pen and paper? Think of the trees, the storage and the hours wasted trying to read a doctor's handwriting
1 Like #36
Where is GCHQ? Anyone responsible should be rapidly identified and duely punished.
#37
300 Bitcoin amounts to over £400,000. So no, it's not a simple £300 charge.
2 Likes #38
Towelie
groenleader
Towelie
groenleader
Not helped that Tony Blair and the Labour party wasted millions on an IT system that was then dumped, then the IT budget was left with nothing for a new system...
Downloading Rkill and running it from the new task menu in task manager followed by Malwarebytes should probably solve the issue!
The man was in charge of the country 10-20yrs ago is somehow responsible!?! 10-20yrs is more than a lifetime in computing terms.
I'd have thought the Health Secretary at the present time would be a good place to start, even more so considering the amount he has slashed from the NHS budget.
LOLS. Its his fault we are in all this mess now!
Don't tell me! You had a Mondeo, tax credits benefit package and cant wait for more borrowing :D
Seriously mate, have you not read this forum over the past few days??

I'll ignore you awfully poor attempts at a personal insult though and attempt to keep the thread on track.

Why blame the man in charge 10-20 yrs ago? Even if he did implement some poor policies, successive governments have had 10yrs to fix it and done nothing about it? Surely they should also take some responsibility for sitting back and doing nothing since??

I don't really agree it is all Blair's fault but for the sake of this, let's just say it was but why have no governments done anything to fix his mess since?
Of all Blair's faults he and the Labour government at the time literally more than doubled the NHS budget.
#39
Just ask the hospital trust to see their "Corporate Risk Register" and see if this risk was recorded and what did they do about it, in each and every year since XP was withdrawn from service and whether each of the trust's most senior director or CEO had even asked Microsoft for a patching service.
#40
Forcepoint Security Labs said that “a major malicious email campaign” consisting of nearly five million emails per hour was spreading the new ransomware.
oO
https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/05/12/nhs_hospital_shut_down_due_to_cyber_attack/

Edited By: thewongwing101 on May 12, 2017 20:03: link

Post a Comment

You don't need an account to leave a comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!