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Ok so please prove me right

ryman1000 Avatar
banned7y, 6d agoPosted 7 years, 6 days ago
My dad has this thing that electricity still passes through a plug, even if its disconnected e.g.... an ipod charger not in the ipod. I told him it obviously doesnt, but he seemed convinced he was right. ( He also thinks electricity goes through it when the switch is off, which is obviously false)
ryman1000 Avatar
banned7y, 6d agoPosted 7 years, 6 days ago
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#1
my dad (a substation electrical engineer) says that whilst the plug is in and the switch is on there is minimal electric going through and indeed wasted.....more if there is an LED on the plug (I think there is on an ipod charger?) but that makes sense as the light must be powered by something

and yeah, when the switch is off theres no electric going through it
#2
OP,Your dad is wrong :thumbsup:
#3
I was told by electricity company that any charger left switched on and plugged in is using electricity even when disconnected. So I guess hes right. Sorry :)
banned#4
lil_tiger
my dad (a substation electrical engineer) says that whilst the plug is in and the switch is on there is minimal electric going through and indeed wasted.....more if there is an LED on the plug (I think there is on an ipod charger?) but that makes sense as the light must be powered by something

and yeah, when the switch is off theres no electric going through it


it's not the one with the LED switch just a plastic block
#5
The capacitors inside a power supply can retain an electrical charge for a few seconds (ie: < 10seconds), after having been unplugged.

A good way of seeing this is by turning your desktop PC off, then unplugging the mains cable from it and immediately pressing the power button to turn it on. It will turn on, for a fraction of a second (ie: power lights/fans inside will come on).
banned#6
kidcat
I was told by electricity company that any charger left switched on and plugged in is using electricity even when disconnected. So I guess hes right. Sorry :)


transit
OP,Your dad is wrong :thumbsup:


We need a third opinion :)
#7
If the plug is switched off at the wall socket then no electricity will be in "The Plug" But if it is switched on, then electricity will flow to the charger even if the ipod is not in the cradle It will still use and cost electricity as the step down coil will be dissipating heat.

So he Is partly right, until the wall switch it turned off.
#8
ryman1000
it's not the one with the LED switch just a plastic block


ryman1000
We need a third opinion :)


as I said (lol) in that case there is minimal electric going through the plug....so yes, there is some wasted
banned#9
SUMMONER
The capacitors inside a power supply can retain an electrical charge for a few seconds (ie: < 10seconds), after having been unplugged.

A good way of seeing this by turning your desktop PC off, then unplugging the mains cable from and immediately press the power button to turn it on. It will turn on, for a fraction of a second (ie: power lights/fans inside will come on).


I know this from previous experience, but im talking about when the device the plug is meant to connect with isnt connected to at all :thumbsup:
banned#10
lil_tiger
as I said (lol) in that case there is minimal electric going through the plug....so yes, there is some wasted


So put simply....
He was wrong :whistling:
#11
ryman1000;7545913
I know this from previous experience, but im talking about when the device the plug is meant to connect with isnt connected to at all :thumbsup:

As stated by the others, it's simply not the case.

Yes, you are right - he is wrong. :gift:
[mod]#12
...a plug can still hold electricity but cannot generate more...
#13
If you put one of those electrical measuring monitoring things over it which you get from British Gas (the ones which tell you the cost) you'll have your answer....
#14
I disagree with most who say a charger plugged in and switched on but not connected to a device doesn't use electricity, it does.

Inside the charger is an AC>DC transformer, if you don't believe this is using electricity feel how warm a charger gets when plugged in but not charging, this heat is a wasteful byproduct of the transformer.
#15
magicjay1986;7545950
...a plug can still hold electricity but cannot generate more...


A plug can't, no.

But a charger can and does as this is an electrical transformer.
[mod]#16
harlzter
A plug can't, no.

But a charger can and does as this is an electrical transformer.


Ever pulled a plug out of a wall and received a little shock from it? It can hold a current.
#17
Almost all domestic electrical equipment that plug into an electrical socket work with a transformer that converts a high voltage to a lower usable voltage. A current will pass through the high voltage side of transformer even if none is being drawn off from the low voltage end unless the power is switched off at the mains or using an on off switch on the device. Mobile phone chargers use about 45mW which is about 0.01kWh per day. So not much power is sed but your dad is still right.
#18
magicjay1986;7546455
Ever pulled a plug out of a wall and received a little shock from it? It can hold a current.

That's just you making a circuit between the two prongs that are still touching the mains socket. :roll:
Always switch off before removing the plug.
#19
jump subject completely! Ryman did you get those headphones ok?
#20
+1 for dad
#21
He is right, acdc conversion therefore heat. He's wrong about the switch tho.
banned#22
stick the tip in water you soon find out
#23
Dad is right, as usual.;-)
#24
magicjay1986;7546455
Ever pulled a plug out of a wall and received a little shock from it? It can hold a current.


NO, that will be the appliance/device its connected to at the other end, a "Plug" simply consists of moulded plastic and some pieces of metal, nothing that is capable of holding a charge:thumbsup:
#25
sassie;7547529
stick the tip in water you soon find out



No no no, ok go on then but post the vid on youtube for us all:whistling:
banned#26
Looking at the comments he's right I'm afraid. Don't think he does it based on his electrical knowledge though more so to his odd tendencies and OCD habits like keeping the gate shut, leave his gate open you'll have an enemy for life. I knew the switch thing he is obviouslly wrong I thought the plug might recognize no current coming back and stop transferring power :-( thanks for clearing it up everyone I won't mention this to him though years of arguments about him being wrong, I won't live it down :)
#27
When you reach your Dads age, you will know exactly where is coming from, and why he is usually right.

It is better known as the University of Life. ;-)
#28
A phone charger is generally a switched-mode power supply. Such a device does make a complete electrical circuit when it is plugged in even without a load, albeit a minimal one, typically around a tenth of a watt for a phone charger, so yes it draws a current and it will cost money. However, at 0.1W it needs to be plugged in for 10000 hours (over a year) to consume a unit of electricty (roughly 15 pence) so the cost is pretty minimal. When a phone is connected the current drawn increases significantly - although a phone charger will rarely draw more that 5 watts of power.

Traditional power supplies - the larger 'brick' sort that you may still use for some items will consume a lot more due to the lower impedance of the transformer coil, but most modern battery-based devices use a SMPS. A laptop PSU will draw substantially more, maybe 1W or above, so should really be disconnected when unused....

Any cable connected to a power source (such as the wiring in your house, or the wiring in the grid from your house to the substation, or indeed the wiring from the substation to the generators at the power station) will transform a small amount of electrical energy into heat, even if no load is connected at the end, due to inducted losses - so a switched-off device plugged into the mains will draw some power - but generally speaking its suchh a minimal amount it isn't worth worrying about...

harlzter;7548202
NO, that will be the appliance/device its connected to at the other end, a "Plug" simply consists of moulded plastic and some pieces of metal, nothing that is capable of holding a charge:thumbsup:


Any conductor is capable of holding a charge, and to some extent a plug will. A device that stores charge (a capacitor) is simply a pair of conductors seperated by an insulator - such as is found in the two metal pins in a plug - but the charge stored is absolutely minute [a seriously tiny, tiny amount!] So what you say is not strictly true, but realistically true!
#29
ALL electrical equipement that uses a step down transformer or swiched mode power supply will use power if its plugged in and switched as its standard practise to place an discharge resistor across the terminals to reduce risk of electric shock to service personal .so while plugged and switched on the resistor is creating a load on the circiut however minimal
#30
.......and my lord, that concludes the case for the prosecution.
banned#31
ryman1000;7545890
We need a third opinion :)

chargers and transformers still use electric if plugged in. You can tell this as they will be warm even when not charging anything.

Normal plugs for say a kettle do not use electric when the kettle is off.

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