So you pay £85 for a Theater Ticket the local special needs home has brought 8 clients with them they are sat close to you and shout and create all through the show, What do you do? - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HotUKDeals, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HotUKDeals app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit

So you pay £85 for a Theater Ticket the local special needs home has brought 8 clients with them they are sat close to you and shout and create all through the show, What do you do?

£0.00 @
This happen to my friend tonight, she is not well off and saved hard to get the chance to see a show, with Travel and stay it will cost about £150 She is in tears show totally ruined for her, the c… Read More
miles136 Avatar
8m, 3w agoPosted 8 months, 3 weeks ago
This happen to my friend tonight, she is not well off and saved hard to get the chance to see a show, with Travel and stay it will cost about £150

She is in tears show totally ruined for her, the clients where shouting out, getting out of their seats, nothing happen, one other person went to take a pic of the performance and theater staff came running down and told the guy he would be asked to leave if he did not follow the rules
miles136 Avatar
8m, 3w agoPosted 8 months, 3 weeks ago
Options

Top Comments

(5)
13 Likes
Agharta
What was the show?

The miserables
9 Likes
Gollywood
Tears?? Come on. It's just a show. Write to Theatre & discuss it with them & see if something can be done.
If you've scrimped and saved up for something for a long time and have been excited to do what could possibly be a once in a lifetime thing for some, you'd be in tears if the whole event was ruined for you.
7 Likes
Contact the theatre and ask for the money back.
As much as I'm aware of this whole PC "everyone is entitled to everything equally" crap, your friends enjoyment and her hard earned money has been for nothing if she couldn't watch the show properly.
If there had been a group of kids misbehaving or intentionally ruining the show, people would be suggesting complaints and refunds and yet you've got a group of people who, through no fault of their own, unintentionally ruined the show and its being suggested she should keep quiet.
Get on to complaining.
7 Likes
I don't know if it's been said but most theatres will have at least one date for their production which is an 'accessible' show. A little like how cinemas do showings suitable for children with autism etc.

These shows are more relaxed, the people there more understanding of issues and there is more of an expectation of mild disruption.

These accessible shows make for a less stressful time for the SN person and also their carer/s, who will have had to face many battles just getting there and settled into a seat.

Hopefully more people will become aware that these accessible shows are available and it will encourage them, and SN people, to feel comfortable enough to go and enjoy the theatre.

I'm not saying SN people shouldn't go to standard performances, but depending on the severity of the condition one of the more relaxed performances may be more enjoyable.
banned 6 Likes
Tell her she can have a night with MrScotchBonnet to ease the pain.

All Comments

(90) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
Page:
#1
If it was me I would be livid and would have asked the staff to sort it out as when you go to the theater there is an expectation that ppl behave appropriately, so if its the rocky horror picture show, its usually a riot, but if its a play then ppl listen and be quiet.

However

if a loved one of mine had development issues or other mental health issues but could enjoy the show I would want to take them
4 Likes #2
just tell your friend to contact the theatre and complain that she was unable to enjoy the show. just explain that you would expect more for the money that was spent. they'll probably refund or offer tickets to another show. always worth a shot
3 Likes #3
Your friend should contact some neo nazi group to sort it out, they are intolerant of disabled people too.

Those disabled or handicapped are entitled to a life and some respect. Bit late grumbling about it after the fact, she should have asked to be reseated if it really was so 'distressing' which would bring any issue to the attention of staff but most people IMO are more tolerant to people with actual diffulties.

If you have an issue with the service anywhere you should sort it out then and there but no doubt wasn't for fear of embarrassment.
banned 6 Likes #4
Tell her she can have a night with MrScotchBonnet to ease the pain.
6 Likes #5
Maybe your friend should count her blessings and think there but for the Grace of God go I . I assume their behaviour was to do with their condition as opposed to sheer bad manners . I appreciate it must be frustrating to your friend but would she rather we lock them all away and pretend they didn't exist like in caucescu's Romania ? I'm the owner of a special needs child and every day is a roller coaster of highs and lows . At the moment for instance I am not allowed to use the word good , I must use the word relieving . It doesn't trip lightly off the tongue . We would be a poorer society if we did not embrace difference and tolerate the side effects . That said , if the disruption was due to inadequate supervision by the carers , I would be livid
banned 3 Likes #6
psychobitchfromhell
Maybe your friend should count her blessings and think there but for the Grace of God go I . I assume their behaviour was to do with their condition as opposed to sheer bad manners . I appreciate it must be frustrating to your friend but would she rather we lock them all away and pretend they didn't exist like in caucescu's Romania ? I'm the owner of a special needs child and every day is a roller coaster of highs and lows . At the moment for instance I am not allowed to use the word good , I must use the word relieving . It doesn't trip lightly off the tongue . We would be a poorer society if we did not embrace difference and tolerate the side effects . That said , if the disruption was due to inadequate supervision by the carers , I would be livid

That just sounds weird.

Apart from that I agree with all that you've said.
2 Likes #7
And these responses highlight the issue, because people might feel ashamed complaining at the time.

Of course we should provide access to a 'normal' life for all people, but there is also a way to comport oneself at the theatre and sometimes these two ideas aren't compatible. Your friend should've made the theatre aware at the time but they could try complaining now. Theatre tickets aren't cheap nowadays and people spend all year looking forward to a trip, and you don't want people ruining it even if it's completely inadvertent and not their fault.
7 Likes #8
Contact the theatre and ask for the money back.
As much as I'm aware of this whole PC "everyone is entitled to everything equally" crap, your friends enjoyment and her hard earned money has been for nothing if she couldn't watch the show properly.
If there had been a group of kids misbehaving or intentionally ruining the show, people would be suggesting complaints and refunds and yet you've got a group of people who, through no fault of their own, unintentionally ruined the show and its being suggested she should keep quiet.
Get on to complaining.
#9
cchopps
psychobitchfromhell
Maybe your friend should count her blessings and think there but for the Grace of God go I . I assume their behaviour was to do with their condition as opposed to sheer bad manners . I appreciate it must be frustrating to your friend but would she rather we lock them all away and pretend they didn't exist like in caucescu's Romania ? I'm the owner of a special needs child and every day is a roller coaster of highs and lows . At the moment for instance I am not allowed to use the word good , I must use the word relieving . It doesn't trip lightly off the tongue . We would be a poorer society if we did not embrace difference and tolerate the side effects . That said , if the disruption was due to inadequate supervision by the carers , I would be livid
That just sounds weird.
Apart from that I agree with all that you've said.
It's all part of being a parent of a child with special needs . Would I rather say relieving every few minutes than be in my friend's position . Her son of the same age died of cancer six months ago. Or my other friend . We were all pregnant at the same time and all expecting boys . Hers was stillborn . Out of the three , only mine is still alive and he is a bit weird . How lucky do I feel
5 Likes #10
psychobitchfromhell
cchopps
psychobitchfromhell
Maybe your friend should count her blessings and think there but for the Grace of God go I . I assume their behaviour was to do with their condition as opposed to sheer bad manners . I appreciate it must be frustrating to your friend but would she rather we lock them all away and pretend they didn't exist like in caucescu's Romania ? I'm the owner of a special needs child and every day is a roller coaster of highs and lows . At the moment for instance I am not allowed to use the word good , I must use the word relieving . It doesn't trip lightly off the tongue . We would be a poorer society if we did not embrace difference and tolerate the side effects . That said , if the disruption was due to inadequate supervision by the carers , I would be livid
That just sounds weird.
Apart from that I agree with all that you've said.
It's all part of being a parent of a child with special needs . Would I rather say relieving every few minutes than be in my friend's position . Her son of the same age died of cancer six months ago. Or my other friend . We were all pregnant at the same time and all expecting boys . Hers was stillborn . Out of the three , only mine is still alive and he is a bit weird . How lucky do I feel

I think it was the fact you said owner that the poster found weird.
1 Like #11
psychobitchfromhell
cchopps
psychobitchfromhell
Maybe your friend should count her blessings and think there but for the Grace of God go I . I assume their behaviour was to do with their condition as opposed to sheer bad manners . I appreciate it must be frustrating to your friend but would she rather we lock them all away and pretend they didn't exist like in caucescu's Romania ? I'm the owner of a special needs child and every day is a roller coaster of highs and lows . At the moment for instance I am not allowed to use the word good , I must use the word relieving . It doesn't trip lightly off the tongue . We would be a poorer society if we did not embrace difference and tolerate the side effects . That said , if the disruption was due to inadequate supervision by the carers , I would be livid
That just sounds weird.
Apart from that I agree with all that you've said.
It's all part of being a parent of a child with special needs . Would I rather say relieving every few minutes than be in my friend's position . Her son of the same age died of cancer six months ago. Or my other friend . We were all pregnant at the same time and all expecting boys . Hers was stillborn . Out of the three , only mine is still alive and he is a bit weird . How lucky do I feel
As for the word owner , if you have a child who does not form a strong emotional bond , love them as you do with every atom of your being , you have to accept the affection will never be returned. I would love to say there was a mother child bond but I know I am expendable .

Edited By: psychobitchfromhell on Sep 30, 2016 07:42
#12
g8spur
psychobitchfromhell
cchopps
psychobitchfromhell
Maybe your friend should count her blessings and think there but for the Grace of God go I . I assume their behaviour was to do with their condition as opposed to sheer bad manners . I appreciate it must be frustrating to your friend but would she rather we lock them all away and pretend they didn't exist like in caucescu's Romania ? I'm the owner of a special needs child and every day is a roller coaster of highs and lows . At the moment for instance I am not allowed to use the word good , I must use the word relieving . It doesn't trip lightly off the tongue . We would be a poorer society if we did not embrace difference and tolerate the side effects . That said , if the disruption was due to inadequate supervision by the carers , I would be livid
That just sounds weird.
Apart from that I agree with all that you've said.
It's all part of being a parent of a child with special needs . Would I rather say relieving every few minutes than be in my friend's position . Her son of the same age died of cancer six months ago. Or my other friend . We were all pregnant at the same time and all expecting boys . Hers was stillborn . Out of the three , only mine is still alive and he is a bit weird . How lucky do I feel
I think it was the fact you said owner that the poster found weird.
It was even in bold..
banned 5 Likes #13
To be fair it could have been a lot worse. This guy could have walked in.

http://global.fncstatic.com/static/managed/img/U.S./ColoradoMovieTheaterShootingYE.jpg




Edited By: MrScotchBonnet on Sep 30, 2016 07:54
1 Like #14
If it was that bad I would have walked out during the performance.

This is why I just watch telly
#15
What was the show?
13 Likes #16
Agharta
What was the show?

The miserables
1 Like #17
g8spur
psychobitchfromhell
cchopps
psychobitchfromhell
Maybe your friend should count her blessings and think there but for the Grace of God go I . I assume their behaviour was to do with their condition as opposed to sheer bad manners . I appreciate it must be frustrating to your friend but would she rather we lock them all away and pretend they didn't exist like in caucescu's Romania ? I'm the owner of a special needs child and every day is a roller coaster of highs and lows . At the moment for instance I am not allowed to use the word good , I must use the word relieving . It doesn't trip lightly off the tongue . We would be a poorer society if we did not embrace difference and tolerate the side effects . That said , if the disruption was due to inadequate supervision by the carers , I would be livid
That just sounds weird.
Apart from that I agree with all that you've said.
It's all part of being a parent of a child with special needs . Would I rather say relieving every few minutes than be in my friend's position . Her son of the same age died of cancer six months ago. Or my other friend . We were all pregnant at the same time and all expecting boys . Hers was stillborn . Out of the three , only mine is still alive and he is a bit weird . How lucky do I feel
I think it was the fact you said owner that the poster found weird.
I get that . I totally get that . The thing is though that this thread is about special needs.I am a the parent of a special needs child .I gave birth to him and I love him unconditionally. To him however it isn't the same thing . Yes he would miss me for a day or two in that his routine was disrupted but after that it would be irrelevant . Owner is maybe not the best word but what else would you say ? Carer is so detached but the idea of parenthood and the strong emotional bonds it entails would be lost on my child . I'm open to suggestions
#18
psychobitchfromhell
g8spur
psychobitchfromhell
cchopps
psychobitchfromhell
Maybe your friend should count her blessings and think there but for the Grace of God go I . I assume their behaviour was to do with their condition as opposed to sheer bad manners . I appreciate it must be frustrating to your friend but would she rather we lock them all away and pretend they didn't exist like in caucescu's Romania ? I'm the owner of a special needs child and every day is a roller coaster of highs and lows . At the moment for instance I am not allowed to use the word good , I must use the word relieving . It doesn't trip lightly off the tongue . We would be a poorer society if we did not embrace difference and tolerate the side effects . That said , if the disruption was due to inadequate supervision by the carers , I would be livid
That just sounds weird.
Apart from that I agree with all that you've said.
It's all part of being a parent of a child with special needs . Would I rather say relieving every few minutes than be in my friend's position . Her son of the same age died of cancer six months ago. Or my other friend . We were all pregnant at the same time and all expecting boys . Hers was stillborn . Out of the three , only mine is still alive and he is a bit weird . How lucky do I feel
I think it was the fact you said owner that the poster found weird.
I get that . I totally get that . The thing is though that this thread is about special needs.I am a the parent of a special needs child .I gave birth to him and I love him unconditionally. To him however it isn't the same thing . Yes he would miss me for a day or two in that his routine was disrupted but after that it would be irrelevant . Owner is maybe not the best word but what else would you say ? Carer is so detached but the idea of parenthood and the strong emotional bonds it entails would be lost on my child . I'm open to suggestions

I'm not going to preach as I'm not in the same situation but I would suggest that your child's detachment is due to disability however you are making a consious decision to form your detachment by labling it.

Parent is a biological term so any ideals associated to this are set by yourself so maybe remove those ideals.

Edited By: g8spur on Sep 30, 2016 08:38
#19
Totally off original topic, but you own a car, you own a tv etc. Anyone who has a child, is a parent. No child with or without a disability, should be referred to as "being owned" . Imo its such a flippant remark. It suggests being a parent, is a throwaway, disposable status.
I along with many feel blessed in being a parent, not everyone is that lucky. I wonder if the poster has any other children that they own.
Is it because the child has a disability, that they don't deserve the right to be classed as a child. After all my children will always be my children until the day

i die.

I am sure if the poster heard a member of the family saying "i own a cousin, nephew, grandchild, brother, sister etc" they would be a touch offended.
#20
g8spur
psychobitchfromhell
g8spur
psychobitchfromhell
cchopps
psychobitchfromhell
Maybe your friend should count her blessings and think there but for the Grace of God go I . I assume their behaviour was to do with their condition as opposed to sheer bad manners . I appreciate it must be frustrating to your friend but would she rather we lock them all away and pretend they didn't exist like in caucescu's Romania ? I'm the owner of a special needs child and every day is a roller coaster of highs and lows . At the moment for instance I am not allowed to use the word good , I must use the word relieving . It doesn't trip lightly off the tongue . We would be a poorer society if we did not embrace difference and tolerate the side effects . That said , if the disruption was due to inadequate supervision by the carers , I would be livid
That just sounds weird.
Apart from that I agree with all that you've said.
It's all part of being a parent of a child with special needs . Would I rather say relieving every few minutes than be in my friend's position . Her son of the same age died of cancer six months ago. Or my other friend . We were all pregnant at the same time and all expecting boys . Hers was stillborn . Out of the three , only mine is still alive and he is a bit weird . How lucky do I feel
I think it was the fact you said owner that the poster found weird.
I get that . I totally get that . The thing is though that this thread is about special needs.I am a the parent of a special needs child .I gave birth to him and I love him unconditionally. To him however it isn't the same thing . Yes he would miss me for a day or two in that his routine was disrupted but after that it would be irrelevant . Owner is maybe not the best word but what else would you say ? Carer is so detached but the idea of parenthood and the strong emotional bonds it entails would be lost on my child . I'm open to suggestions
I'm not going to preach as I'm not in the same situation but I would suggest that your child's detachment is due to disability however you are making a consious decision to form your detachment by labling it.
Parent is a biological term so any ideals associated to this are set by yourself so maybe remove those ideals.
A very fair point and well made . I won't deny there is an element of self preservation in my attitude but that is to retain my sanity . It's a long sad and complicated story so I won't bother you with the details. The thread is about disability in public places and while I agree it can be seriously annoying , should we not be grateful we live in a society that tolerates this and maybe just be grateful we are well enough to appreciate this
#21
mum1964
Totally off original topic, but you own a car, you own a tv etc. Anyone who has a child, is a parent. No child with or without a disability, should be referred to as "being owned" . Imo its such a flippant remark. It suggests being a parent, is a throwaway, disposable status.
I along with many feel blessed in being a parent, not everyone is that lucky. I wonder if the poster has any other children that they own.
Is it because the child has a disability, that they don't deserve the right to be classed as a child. After all my children will always be my children until the day
i die.
I am sure if the poster heard a member of the family saying "i own a cousin, nephew, grandchild, brother, sister etc" they would be a touch offended.
I don't know psychobitchfromhell personally I've only ever read her comments on this site and even then I didn't until just reading todays comments know how much she is suffering (hope you understand the expression) by "trying" to provide love, support and every other need to her child who as per what's been stated in the last few comments cannot reciprocate that love and affection that any other child would.

Now I've been married before and I've seen/watched illness destroy my wife, my love and my life. I've seen dementia affect every part of my life but I did have 20+ years of real love and real life and I'm thankful for that but psychobitchfromhell won't get any of that although she wants it and she needs it but because of how her child is she has had to do things differently and yes even label things like a coping/understanding mechanism.

In her words - she's lucky to have her child because her 2 friends have both lost theirs yet she knows that love a normal parent gives their child will never be reciprocated.

In other words I find your lack of understanding almost offensive

Edited By: philphil61 on Sep 30, 2016 09:37
#22
Tears?? Come on. It's just a show. Write to Theatre & discuss it with them & see if something can be done.
9 Likes #23
Gollywood
Tears?? Come on. It's just a show. Write to Theatre & discuss it with them & see if something can be done.
If you've scrimped and saved up for something for a long time and have been excited to do what could possibly be a once in a lifetime thing for some, you'd be in tears if the whole event was ruined for you.
#24
What a bitter sweet thread :(

Agree with multiple people on different points.

Edited By: EN1GMA on Sep 30, 2016 09:59
2 Likes #25
stuarthanley
Gollywood
Tears?? Come on. It's just a show. Write to Theatre & discuss it with them & see if something can be done.
If you've scrimped and saved up for something for a long time and have been excited to do what could possibly be a once in a lifetime thing for some, you'd be in tears if the whole event was ruined for you.


I wouldn't be in tears
4 Likes #26
the lady has every right to be upset. I know I would be if someone was disturbing a show I had paid for. The fact that they are disabled is obviously very sad... but that doesnt mean that disabled people have an exclusive right to behave inappropriately and nobody else is allowed to be upset about it simply because they are disabled. Ofcourse they are allowed to go and enjoy a show... but shaming this poor woman for feeling she didnt get her moneys worth is shameful in itself. If the noise is ruining the experience for other paying customers then that should be addressed. you should appreciate the fact that this lady didn't want to draw attention to the issue at the time even though she had every right to do so.
4 Likes #27
Miles you seem to have a lot of scenarios involving your friends lol
2 Likes #28
So you pay £85 for a Theater Ticket the HUKD Mods has brought 8 Miscers with them, they are sat close to you and shout and create all through the show, What do you do?



Corrected.8)
#29
show some respect these poor people did not ask to be born like this. my mam had ms and if anyone give her a dirty look there had me to answer too. coz people are disabled do sent mean there should be treated any different
#30
You asked.... What do you do?

I would count myself lucky that me and my Fam are healthy and don't have a condition what makes these disabled people get over excited, therefor making noise and get out of their seats.

All you had to do was enjoy the show and "ignore" what's going on around you.
Concentrate and put it out of your mind, rather than getting annoyed about it...
People who suffer from severe tinnitus have to do that every day...

Edited By: hjm on Sep 30, 2016 11:12
2 Likes #31
hjm
You asked.... What do you do?
I would count myself lucky that me and my Fam are healthy and don't have a condition what makes these disabled people get over excited, therefor making noise and get out of their seats.
All you had to do was enjoy the show and "ignore" what's going on around you.
Concentrate and put it out of your mind, rather than getting annoyed about it...

People who suffer from severe tinnitus have to do that every day...

But if you go to the theatre then you're expected to behave in a certain way, for a large part. You expect other audience members to behave in a certain way.

Obviously we should try to include all members of society in as much as possible which is why special screenings or showtimes are a good idea, but if you or I go to the theatre then you expect a certain atmosphere.
#32
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
hjm
You asked.... What do you do?
I would count myself lucky that me and my Fam are healthy and don't have a condition what makes these disabled people get over excited, therefor making noise and get out of their seats.All you had to do was enjoy the show and "ignore" what's going on around you.
Concentrate and put it out of your mind, rather than getting annoyed about it...

People who suffer from severe tinnitus have to do that every day...
But if you go to the theatre then you're expected to behave in a certain way, for a large part. You expect other audience members to behave in a certain way.
Obviously we should try to include all members of society in as much as possible which is why special screenings or showtimes are a good idea, but if you or I go to the theatre then you expect a certain atmosphere.

So disabled or people with learning or behaviour conditions should stay out of theatres?
Special screenings are for people without these conditions too.
No matter where you go, there is always a chance someone with a certain condition gets over excited and or noisy.
We can't lock them up incase others don't like it...
4 Likes #33
I've read this thread with interest as it poses some interesting points on both sides, but all things considered my opinion is this;

I would suggest that your friend takes a long, hard look at the world we're living in and be thankful at how lucky they are. I appreciate it might have been an "inconvenience" for her but that's all it is, in the big scheme of things it's nothing. Those poor people are stuck with those conditions every day of their lives, your friend had to tolerate a distraction for just a couple of hours. Life isn't fair - just ask the people with disabilities!

I would hope that she would be have enough empathy and compassion to tolerate and appreciate the show despite the distractions around her. Some of the comments on here appal me - people seem to be suggesting we segregate disabled people because they are an inconvenience to "everyone else". Such a dangerous, intolerant mind-set – where does it end? “Demand money back” because there’s disabled people in the audience. Really? Is this what we’ve become; that we’ve got such a sense of entitlement that how a disabled person dare ruin the experience!!

I am sorry your friend didn’t have the experience she hoped for, I am. But you know what, that’s life. Look at the bigger picture; she should have left the show thankful she was able to attend able bodied and able minded and compassionate of the poor folk who don’t enjoy that luxury. She’ll get over it – the “special needs” guest won’t.

Live and let live – if we all had a little more tolerance and compassion the world would be a much better place for all of us.
#34
Sam000001
I've read this thread with interest as it poses some interesting points on both sides, but all things considered my opinion is this;
I would suggest that your friend takes a long, hard look at the world we're living in and be thankful at how lucky they are. I appreciate it might have been an "inconvenience" for her but that's all it is, in the big scheme of things it's nothing. Those poor people are stuck with those conditions every day of their lives, your friend had to tolerate a distraction for just a couple of hours. Life isn't fair - just ask the people with disabilities!
I would hope that she would be have enough empathy and compassion to tolerate and appreciate the show despite the distractions around her. Some of the comments on here appal me - people seem to be suggesting we segregate disabled people because they are an inconvenience to "everyone else". Such a dangerous, intolerant mind-set – where does it end? “Demand money back” because there’s disabled people in the audience. Really? Is this what we’ve become; that we’ve got such a sense of entitlement that how a disabled person dare ruin the experience!!
I am sorry your friend didn’t have the experience she hoped for, I am. But you know what, that’s life. Look at the bigger picture; she should have left the show thankful she was able to attend able bodied and able minded and compassionate of the poor folk who don’t enjoy that luxury. She’ll get over it – the “special needs” guest won’t.
Live and let live – if we all had a little more tolerance and compassion the world would be a much better place for all of us.

Very well said...
2 Likes #35
hjm
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
hjm
You asked.... What do you do?
I would count myself lucky that me and my Fam are healthy and don't have a condition what makes these disabled people get over excited, therefor making noise and get out of their seats.All you had to do was enjoy the show and "ignore" what's going on around you.
Concentrate and put it out of your mind, rather than getting annoyed about it...

People who suffer from severe tinnitus have to do that every day...
But if you go to the theatre then you're expected to behave in a certain way, for a large part. You expect other audience members to behave in a certain way.
Obviously we should try to include all members of society in as much as possible which is why special screenings or showtimes are a good idea, but if you or I go to the theatre then you expect a certain atmosphere.
So disabled or people with learning or behaviour conditions should stay out of theatres?
Special screenings are for people without these conditions too.
No matter where you go, there is always a chance someone with a certain condition gets over excited and or noisy.
We can't lock them up incase others don't like it...

I'm not saying we should lock people up. I'm saying that when you go to most theatre shows there's a certain expectation of the audience. There are even signs up in most telling you that before you go.

Now if people want to pretend that this isn't the case then that's fine. Stop reading here because if you can't get on board with that premise then there's no point going any further.

But if we accept that, then when you purchase a ticket you're not only agreeing to that but your expecting to receive that.

The person in the OP didn't, therefore they have a case for a refund.




Sam000001
Demand money back” because there’s disabled people in the audience. Really? Is this what we’ve become;

No, we haven't. You've fundamentally misunderstood the point.

No-one (hopefully) would object to any type of person being in an audience. The issue is that the enjoyment of the show was impaired by the things the OP mentioned.

I've been at shows where groups of schoolkids were in the audience. Most of the time that's not an issue but I have had to ask them to be quiet before. They did and it was fine.

But if they hadn't then I would've complained to an usher and if that didn't fix it then I'd have asked for a refund. That's acceptable right?

Does that mean I hate kids? Does that mean I want them all locked up? Of course not, so apply that same thinking to this instance and stop trying to make people sound like eugenicists wanting a purely Aryan audience.
3 Likes #36
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
[quote=hjm][quote=HotEnglishAndWelshDeals][quote=hjm]
No, we haven't. You've fundamentally misunderstood the point.
No-one (hopefully) would object to any type of person being in an audience. The issue is that the enjoyment of the show was impaired by the things the OP mentioned.
I've been at shows where groups of schoolkids were in the audience. Most of the time that's not an issue but I have had to ask them to be quiet before. They did and it was fine.
But if they hadn't then I would've complained to an usher and if that didn't fix it then I'd have asked for a refund. That's acceptable right?
Does that mean I hate kids? Does that mean I want them all locked up? Of course not, so apply that same thinking to this instance and stop trying to make people sound like eugenicists wanting a purely Aryan audience.


The big difference between those two scenarios is that a child at a showing should be appropriately supervised and the onus on the parent / guardian / teacher to ensure the child behaves during a show. That situation is resolvable, and if it isn’t dealt with by the parent / guardian or the stewards then you have cause for complaint because that situation is avoidable.
That doesn’t apply to disabled people – they can’t control it and it shouldn't ruin your experience because its unavoidable.

What does a theater do; give 1,000 people refunds because 8 disabled people happen to be in the audience? What I am suggesting is that OP’s friend realize that the situation is out of anybody’s control and appreciate it for what it is.
Why let something you can’t control ruin the experience for you? There’s a difference between disabled people and misbehaved children – one situation is controllable one isn’t.

Here’s an analogy I think you can draw similarities from;
You get to drive a super car for a day – one day only. You’ve been really looking forward to it, have loads of routes planned out where you can really put your foot down. But when you finally get around to driving the car for the day the weather is awful and traffic is at a standstill and you never get over 20mph in it. Do you complain to the garage that you didn’t enjoy the car? Or do you appreciate the fact you still got to experience and drive the car, despite it not being exactly how you imagined?
2 Likes #37
sam00001
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
[quote=hjm][quote=HotEnglishAndWelshDeals][quote=hjm]
No, we haven't. You've fundamentally misunderstood the point.
No-one (hopefully) would object to any type of person being in an audience. The issue is that the enjoyment of the show was impaired by the things the OP mentioned.
I've been at shows where groups of schoolkids were in the audience. Most of the time that's not an issue but I have had to ask them to be quiet before. They did and it was fine.
But if they hadn't then I would've complained to an usher and if that didn't fix it then I'd have asked for a refund. That's acceptable right?
Does that mean I hate kids? Does that mean I want them all locked up? Of course not, so apply that same thinking to this instance and stop trying to make people sound like eugenicists wanting a purely Aryan audience.
The big difference between those two scenarios is that a child at a showing should be appropriately supervised and the onus on the parent / guardian / teacher to ensure the child behaves during a show. That situation is resolvable, and if it isn’t dealt with by the parent / guardian or the stewards then you have cause for complaint because that situation is avoidable.
That doesn’t apply to disabled people – they can’t control it and it shouldn't ruin your experience because its unavoidable.
What does a theater do; give 1,000 people refunds because 8 disabled people happen to be in the audience? What I am suggesting is that OP’s friend realize that the situation is out of anybody’s control and appreciate it for what it is.
Why let something you can’t control ruin the experience for you? There’s a difference between disabled people and misbehaved children – one situation is controllable one isn’t.
Here’s an analogy I think you can draw similarities from;
You get to drive a super car for a day – one day only. You’ve been really looking forward to it, have loads of routes planned out where you can really put your foot down. But when you finally get around to driving the car for the day the weather is awful and traffic is at a standstill and you never get over 20mph in it. Do you complain to the garage that you didn’t enjoy the car? Or do you appreciate the fact you still got to experience and drive the car, despite it not being exactly how you imagined?

You don't seem to understand though. The issue isn't about who is making the noise but about the impact of that noise on your enjoyment of the show. What you're saying is that if someone is shouting out continuously then if it's a special needs person then that noise shouldn't impact your viewing of the show, but if it isn't then it can.

That's ridiculous. The effect (and the effect is what's important here) is the same.

Can you have sympathy? Absolutely, it would be weird no to. You should explain that to the theatre in a compassionate way, but it doesn't matter if you can't hear the words because someone is shouting because they can't help it or because they're just ignorant - THE EFFECT IS THE SAME.

As for your analogy, it's terrible. When you rent a car you aren't renting the conditions. When you buy a theatre ticket then there's almost always an agreed upon set of standards for the theatre, the atmosphere and the level of audience participation.

That's what isn't being met and that's why there's grounds for compensation.
1 Like #38
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
sam00001
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
[quote=hjm][quote=HotEnglishAndWelshDeals][quote=hjm]
No, we haven't. You've fundamentally misunderstood the point.
No-one (hopefully) would object to any type of person being in an audience. The issue is that the enjoyment of the show was impaired by the things the OP mentioned.
I've been at shows where groups of schoolkids were in the audience. Most of the time that's not an issue but I have had to ask them to be quiet before. They did and it was fine.
But if they hadn't then I would've complained to an usher and if that didn't fix it then I'd have asked for a refund. That's acceptable right?
Does that mean I hate kids? Does that mean I want them all locked up? Of course not, so apply that same thinking to this instance and stop trying to make people sound like eugenicists wanting a purely Aryan audience.
The big difference between those two scenarios is that a child at a showing should be appropriately supervised and the onus on the parent / guardian / teacher to ensure the child behaves during a show. That situation is resolvable, and if it isn’t dealt with by the parent / guardian or the stewards then you have cause for complaint because that situation is avoidable.
That doesn’t apply to disabled people – they can’t control it and it shouldn't ruin your experience because its unavoidable.
What does a theater do; give 1,000 people refunds because 8 disabled people happen to be in the audience? What I am suggesting is that OP’s friend realize that the situation is out of anybody’s control and appreciate it for what it is.
Why let something you can’t control ruin the experience for you? There’s a difference between disabled people and misbehaved children – one situation is controllable one isn’t.
Here’s an analogy I think you can draw similarities from;
You get to drive a super car for a day – one day only. You’ve been really looking forward to it, have loads of routes planned out where you can really put your foot down. But when you finally get around to driving the car for the day the weather is awful and traffic is at a standstill and you never get over 20mph in it. Do you complain to the garage that you didn’t enjoy the car? Or do you appreciate the fact you still got to experience and drive the car, despite it not being exactly how you imagined?
You don't seem to understand though. The issue isn't about who is making the noise but about the impact of that noise on your enjoyment of the show. What you're saying is that if someone is shouting out continuously then if it's a special needs person then that noise shouldn't impact your viewing of the show, but if it isn't then it can.
That's ridiculous. The effect (and the effect is what's important here) is the same.
Can you have sympathy? Absolutely, it would be weird no to. You should explain that to the theatre in a compassionate way, but it doesn't matter if you can't hear the words because someone is shouting because they can't help it or because they're just ignorant - THE EFFECT IS THE SAME.
As for your analogy, it's terrible. When you rent a car you aren't renting the conditions. When you buy a theatre ticket then there's almost always an agreed upon set of standards for the theatre, the atmosphere and the level of audience participation.
That's what isn't being met and that's why there's grounds for compensation.

Okay, so it's fine for disabled people to be in an audience as long as everyone else is entitled to their money back, right?

There is no grounds for compensation unless the theater made promises before purchasing the ticket that nobody in the crowd would ruin it for you.

Edited By: sam00001 on Sep 30, 2016 13:24: additionalcomment
6 Likes #39
Nobody goes to the theatre with expectations that they might not be able to see & hear the performance that they've paid for.
I don't know why people are getting on their high horse in defending those with "special needs" because this isn't about that. Nobody has stated that those with "special needs" shouldn't be entitled to do the same as those without "special needs" but, all the same time, a person is entitled to enjoy the experience that they've paid for to its fullest.
Would the people defending be happy if a group of teenagers had sat next to them and chatted/used their phones/thrown popcorn at each other? If not, why not? Just because one scenario is involuntary and the other is voluntary, it doesn't change the end experience.
2 Likes #40
sam00001
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
sam00001
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
[quote=hjm][quote=HotEnglishAndWelshDeals][quote=hjm]
No, we haven't. You've fundamentally misunderstood the point.
No-one (hopefully) would object to any type of person being in an audience. The issue is that the enjoyment of the show was impaired by the things the OP mentioned.
I've been at shows where groups of schoolkids were in the audience. Most of the time that's not an issue but I have had to ask them to be quiet before. They did and it was fine.
But if they hadn't then I would've complained to an usher and if that didn't fix it then I'd have asked for a refund. That's acceptable right?
Does that mean I hate kids? Does that mean I want them all locked up? Of course not, so apply that same thinking to this instance and stop trying to make people sound like eugenicists wanting a purely Aryan audience.
The big difference between those two scenarios is that a child at a showing should be appropriately supervised and the onus on the parent / guardian / teacher to ensure the child behaves during a show. That situation is resolvable, and if it isn’t dealt with by the parent / guardian or the stewards then you have cause for complaint because that situation is avoidable.
That doesn’t apply to disabled people – they can’t control it and it shouldn't ruin your experience because its unavoidable.
What does a theater do; give 1,000 people refunds because 8 disabled people happen to be in the audience? What I am suggesting is that OP’s friend realize that the situation is out of anybody’s control and appreciate it for what it is.
Why let something you can’t control ruin the experience for you? There’s a difference between disabled people and misbehaved children – one situation is controllable one isn’t.
Here’s an analogy I think you can draw similarities from;
You get to drive a super car for a day – one day only. You’ve been really looking forward to it, have loads of routes planned out where you can really put your foot down. But when you finally get around to driving the car for the day the weather is awful and traffic is at a standstill and you never get over 20mph in it. Do you complain to the garage that you didn’t enjoy the car? Or do you appreciate the fact you still got to experience and drive the car, despite it not being exactly how you imagined?
You don't seem to understand though. The issue isn't about who is making the noise but about the impact of that noise on your enjoyment of the show. What you're saying is that if someone is shouting out continuously then if it's a special needs person then that noise shouldn't impact your viewing of the show, but if it isn't then it can.
That's ridiculous. The effect (and the effect is what's important here) is the same.
Can you have sympathy? Absolutely, it would be weird no to. You should explain that to the theatre in a compassionate way, but it doesn't matter if you can't hear the words because someone is shouting because they can't help it or because they're just ignorant - THE EFFECT IS THE SAME.
As for your analogy, it's terrible. When you rent a car you aren't renting the conditions. When you buy a theatre ticket then there's almost always an agreed upon set of standards for the theatre, the atmosphere and the level of audience participation.
That's what isn't being met and that's why there's grounds for compensation.
Okay, so it's fine for disabled people to be in an audience as long as everyone else is entitled to their money back, right?

Let's try not to paint in such broad strokes ok. The mere presence of a disabled person isn't going to impinge on somebody's enjoyment of the show. By that same token, an audience without disabled persons isn't a guarantee of someone not making unnecessary noise.

Again, it's the effect. Let's focus on that. Not the person making it, not the reason for it, but the very existence of that noise.

I'm not discriminating on the source of that noise. If someone shouts during Bring Him Home the noise doesn't cease to exist based on it coming from a disabled person or not.

The effect is the same and it's the effect that could be the basis for compensation.

sam00001

There is no grounds for compensation unless the theater made promises before purchasing the ticket that nobody in the crowd would ruin it for you.

Actually when you buy a ticket you do agree to Ts and Cs which state something along the lines of 'the venue has the right to remove you if you behave in a manner that could affect others' enjoyment of the show'.

This is the point we're discussing. It doesn't discriminate based on whether they have a disability or not so neither should you.

Edited By: HotEnglishAndWelshDeals on Sep 30, 2016 13:33

Post a Comment

You don't need an account to leave a comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!