Met Police Invest in 'Minority Report' Software. - HotUKDeals
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Met Police Invest in 'Minority Report' Software.

Punjab Avatar
5y, 6m agoPosted 5 years, 6 months ago
Police have bought software that maps suspects' movements in space and time, in a step towards the futuristic crime detecting imagined in Minority Report.
Punjab Avatar
5y, 6m agoPosted 5 years, 6 months ago
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#1
Britain's largest police force is using software that can map nearly every move suspects and their associates make in the digital world, prompting an outcry from civil liberties groups.

The Metropolitan police has bought Geotime, a security programme used by the US military, which shows an individual's movements and communications with other people on a three-dimensional graphic. It can be used to collate information gathered from social networking sites, satellite navigation equipment, mobile phones, financial transactions and IP network logs.

Democratic freedom ftw, oh wait.
#2
I'm not saying it's a good or bad thing but anyone with an opinion should look at least 40 years ahead.

Edited By: Joey Bloggsy on May 11, 2011 18:50
#3
I had to sign the Official Secrets Act in the mid-1990s, so I cannot go into too much detail (even now) as I am still bound by my obligations, but Her Majesty's Finest Boys & Girls in Blue were tracking people's movements with telephone records long before Apple & Android devices were available.

BFN,

fp.
1 Like #4
Fanpages, maybe, if you were 'bound by your obligations' you shouldn't have even mentioned that you apparently signed the official secrets act and so couldn't comment on something like this. People such as yourself make the general public not trust the police and believe what they read in the media.
#5
Is signing the Official Secrets Act a secret? I love secrets.
#6
nutley10
Fanpages, maybe, if you were 'bound by your obligations' you shouldn't have even mentioned that you apparently signed the official secrets act and so couldn't comment on something like this. People such as yourself make the general public not trust the police and believe what they read in the media.


I didn't "apparently" sign it. I did sign it.

I wasn't the first to do so & I certainly wasn't the last person to do so.

With Closed Circuit Television, Global Positioning based on triangulation of mobile telephone mast signals, Oyster Cards, Credit Card usage, Automated Teller Machine access, & numerous other methods of tracking an individual's movement on a minute by minute basis, the fact I signed the Official Secrets Act almost fifteen years ago should be the least of your worries.

angelfairee
Is signing the Official Secrets Act a secret? I love secrets.


:)

No, it isn't a secret to disclose being bound by the Act. Sorry to spoil your fun.

BFN,

fp.

Edited By: fanpages on May 11, 2011 22:22: Merged replies
#7
All sorts of people sign the act, electricians working for the MOD, drivers, all sorts, which is what I suspect yourself did IMO.

Explaining the simple ways that we can be tracked is nothing spectacular, should you have used said methods I know that you would not have discussed them on a forum such as this. You signing the official secrets act, I can assure you, does not worry me at all.

If you happen to know methods that the public can be tracked/traced (which you have mentioned) maybe you should keep that to yourself and not attempt to scare/shock people with what you are aware of?
#8
All sorts of people sign the act, electricians working for the MOD, drivers, all sorts, which is what I suspect yourself did IMO.

Explaining the simple ways that we can be tracked is nothing spectacular, should you have used said methods I know that you would not have discussed them on a forum such as this. You signing the official secrets act, I can assure you, does not worry me at all.

If you happen to know methods that the public can be tracked/traced (which you have mentioned) maybe you should keep that to yourself and not attempt to scare/shock people with what you are aware of?
#9
nutley10
All sorts of people sign the act, electricians working for the MOD, drivers, all sorts, which is what I suspect yourself did IMO.

Explaining the simple ways that we can be tracked is nothing spectacular, should you have used said methods I know that you would not have discussed them on a forum such as this. You signing the official secrets act, I can assure you, does not worry me at all.

If you happen to know methods that the public can be tracked/traced (which you have mentioned) maybe you should keep that to yourself and not attempt to scare/shock people with what you are aware of?



The reason for my need to be restricted in what I am able to discuss was not for any of the reasons, or because of any of the professions, you listed.

None of the methods I mentioned (or, indeed punjab listed above; that you have not expressed a dissatisfaction with) were related to the activities I was involved with.

My point, originally, was that tracking people is not news. The increase in the use of digital technology in some respects makes the task much easier. It certainly helps in the relaying of an individual's position to any party with a vested interest within seconds rather than communicating the information by other means.

BFN,

fp.

PS. Douglas Adams may have died 10 years ago (today; 11 May 2011), but he had insight into the use of technology back in 1999... [ http://www.douglasadams.com/dna/19990901-00-a.html ].
1 Like #10
Nothing new really. Someone's just taken everything they've used in the past, along with possibly a few fancy frills, and packaged it into one product.

I'm sure if you dug deep enough into who the investors of facebook are, you'd find some scary/interesting information. That's if they didn't make you disappear first. It is afterall one of the largest databases of personal information available, and it's kept up-to-date by the public themselves. Genius really!

Last year the police implemented a system in Birmingham which triangulates in realtime the exact (Within a 25 metre radius, from upto 2km away) position of where a gunshot originated from, and how many shots were fired. Enabling them to deploy the right amount of officers to the precise location within minutes of the shots being fired.

Bare in mind, these are only the things the public are made privy to.

Edited By: ClubLife on May 11, 2011 23:44
#11
Maybe they should invest in coppers that give a **** in the first place.....
banned#12
I remember at school when kids would go round saying they know a secret but they can't tell...
#13
ClubLife
...Bare in mind, these are only the things the public are made privy to.


I expect you would not want a call at any time of day or night to be asked if those employed & responsible to protect & serve you in the interests of national security can locate a known terrorist somewhere in the world. So, yes, the public is not privy to all methods of detection.

If such information were made public then those that we are being protected from would be aware they were being traced & change either their actions or their form of communication.

BFN,

fp.
#14
fanpages


I expect you would not want a call at any time of day or night to be asked if those employed & responsible to protect & serve you in the interests of national security can locate a known terrorist somewhere in the world. So, yes, the public is not privy to all methods of detection.

If such information were made public then those that we are being protected from would be aware they were being traced & change either their actions or their form of communication.

BFN,

fp.

Agreed, and I think it goes without saying.

ClubLife
...Bare in mind, these are only the things the public are made privy to.

My sarcasm, and sarcasm in general, doesn't really come over well online :p

It'll never cease to amaze me how naive and sheltered some people can be though. It sells papers though!

Edited By: ClubLife on May 12, 2011 00:42: .

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