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Police seem more stretched than I first thought.

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We all know that the police force has been reduced & that we need more police. I've just been reading a story on facebook about a girl who sold an iphone 7 & the buyer paid her in fake £50 notes. Ye… Read More
WheresMeNuts Avatar
4m, 1w agoPosted 4 months, 1 week ago
We all know that the police force has been reduced & that we need more police.
I've just been reading a story on facebook about a girl who sold an iphone 7 & the buyer paid her in fake £50 notes.
Yes she was stupid taken such notes, but it's happened.
She then see's an add that a guy is selling an iphone 7 & she has a feeling it's the same person.
She calls & says she wants to buy the phone & the dumb guy agrees to meet her.
She sits in her car across the road & takes a photo of the guy & calls the police.
The police say they can't help her as it's a mutual dispute.

The girl had the guy waiting almost an hour as well,so no excuses from the police on catching him.

Here is a Copy N Paste in first post & her clear photo of the criminal.
WheresMeNuts Avatar
4m, 1w agoPosted 4 months, 1 week ago
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1 Like #1
we sold an iPhone 7 to a guy we believe to be from the Coatbridge/Airdrie area, he paid us £600 in fake £50 notes, I set a fake gumtree ad up 2 days later and the same guy appeared, obviously we never showed up but we were in the car...does anyone know this man

http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w88/tigerplank/Crook2_zpsyqbv4sd8.jpg

http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w88/tigerplank/Crook1_zps2dlgwinx.jpg
1 Like #2
looks like a right plum and probably is.
8 Likes #3
she should have got someone to buy it from him using the same fake notes he used to buy it lol
1 Like #4
Good for her but we all know the police force is a farce. They're constantly being reprimanded for being ineffective and not doing their job although in my opinion it's partly down to being curtailed by H&S and PC BS but still mostly because of the 'it's only a job' mentality that is abhorrent across much of the public service institution's.
If she said she had restrained the man on the ground they'd soon turn up to take her away.
banned#5
How is this a 'mutual dispute'? Sure'y this is against the law?

http://www.criminallawyer.co.uk/services/fraud-and-business-crime/counterfeiting-money/passing-tendering-or-delivering-counterfeit-notes-or-coins/

It is an offence under section 15 of the Forgery and Counterfeiting Act 1981 for a person to:

Pass or tender as genuine anything which is and which he knows or believes to be, a counterfeit of a currency note or of a protected coin or,
To deliver to another anything which is and which he knows or believes to be, a counterfeit, intending that the person to whom it is delivered or another shall pass or tender it as genuine,
It is also an offence for a person to deliver to another, without lawful authority or excuse, anything which is, and which he knows or believes to be, a counterfeit of a currency note or of a protected coin.
#6
I remember when I got mugged as a young child, I knew the names of the people that did it and gave the names to the police, well known to them. All they said was they won't be able to help but would turn a blind eye if someone got revenge and gave them a good kicking... Thanks for that Mr policeman, but that doesn't really help someone who wants to be lawful.
#7
I once owned a 125cc moped that was stolen from a shopping centre car park in broad daylight. The lad was seen taking it by members of the public who shouted and chased after him, causing him to crash it. Thankfully a patrol car was passing and picked him up. Yeah, however it seems that as his actual fingerprints weren't found on the bike and as he was amongst other youths there was nothing they could do to prosecute according to them, as the members of the public who witnessed it could only give a description detailing clothing etc... At times the law is a joke
#8
scott_safc
I once owned a 125cc moped that was stolen from a shopping centre car park in broad daylight. The lad was seen taking it by members of the public who shouted and chased after him, causing him to crash it. Thankfully a patrol car was passing and picked him up. Yeah, however it seems that as his actual fingerprints weren't found on the bike and as he was amongst other youths there was nothing they could do to prosecute according to them, as the members of the public who witnessed it could only give a description detailing clothing etc... At times the law is a joke

I totally agree but they have to have enough evidence that a court will convict. A description with clothing does not suffice unfortunately. The law is an ass.

Good luck with the £50 swindler OP.


Edited By: skidderbrown on Dec 12, 2016 11:52
3 Likes #9
When a family member got scammed they weren't interested, even though I found hundreds of reports about the same guy online and we could tell them where the scammer was right that moment.

When I was sold a stolen camera on ebay I had no knowledge was stolen, they hauled me in for an interview like a criminal, then tried to get me to sign a false statement that said I knew far more about the seller than I did so they could take him to court. I was literally sitting there watching them write a statement in front of me that wasn't true, I was saying that didn't happen, that didn't happen and they kept writing. Then got in a pissy with me because I wouldn't sign it.

Surely the fact the recovered a camera that was the one that was stolen should be evidence enough? The sale was logged through ebay. They then proceeded to break the camera in front of me, so it couldn't even go back to it's original owner.

They're crap at dealing with these things.
10 Likes #10
I have become very concerned about the lack of police responce nowadays.
So, I went on ebay and bought two ISIS flags which I have placed in each corner of my front garden. I also bought an Iranian flag which I have hung out of my front bedroom window, now MI5 has moved in next door and the CIA are watching from accross the road. I have never felt safer! ;)
#11
delusion
All they said was they won't be able to help but would turn a blind eye if someone got revenge and gave them a good kicking... Thanks for that Mr policeman, but that doesn't really help someone who wants to be lawful.

I was given similar advice when two blokes followed me home and pepper sprayed me. Blinded for two hours :(
1 Like #12
"obviously we never showed up"

if someone paid me that much in fake money and I could meet him again, I would certainly be showing up
#13
Why didn't she take afew male friends along with her and get her phone back??
#14
Joe909090
How is this a 'mutual dispute'? Sure'y this is against the law?http://www.criminallawyer.co.uk/services/fraud-and-business-crime/counterfeiting-money/passing-tendering-or-delivering-counterfeit-notes-or-coins/
It is an offence under section 15 of the Forgery and Counterfeiting Act 1981 for a person to:
Pass or tender as genuine anything which is and which he knows or believes to be, a counterfeit of a currency note or of a protected coin or,
To deliver to another anything which is and which he knows or believes to be, a counterfeit, intending that the person to whom it is delivered or another shall pass or tender it as genuine,
It is also an offence for a person to deliver to another, without lawful authority or excuse, anything which is, and which he knows or believes to be, a counterfeit of a currency note or of a protected coin.

Can the victim prove the buyer knew the notes were counterfeit?

On the evidence gained so far, this "mutual dispute" would not go as far as a Court case.
#15
Bring back the Sweeny
#16
Sambat
Bring back the Sweeny

"Gt yr trousrs on, you'r nickd".
1 Like #17
Obviously the police are supposed to show up and arrest a guy based on no evidence that he's done anything wrong.
#18
The police aren't interested in dong anything that requires real work. They'd rather sit in camera vans and take photo's of cars and add made up speeds to them so they can make a few quid before Christmas. . .
banned 1 Like #19
fanpages
Joe909090
How is this a 'mutual dispute'? Sure'y this is against the law?http://www.criminallawyer.co.uk/services/fraud-and-business-crime/counterfeiting-money/passing-tendering-or-delivering-counterfeit-notes-or-coins/
It is an offence under section 15 of the Forgery and Counterfeiting Act 1981 for a person to:
Pass or tender as genuine anything which is and which he knows or believes to be, a counterfeit of a currency note or of a protected coin or,
To deliver to another anything which is and which he knows or believes to be, a counterfeit, intending that the person to whom it is delivered or another shall pass or tender it as genuine,
It is also an offence for a person to deliver to another, without lawful authority or excuse, anything which is, and which he knows or believes to be, a counterfeit of a currency note or of a protected coin.
Can the victim prove the buyer knew the notes were counterfeit?
On the evidence gained so far, this "mutual dispute" would not go as far as a Court case.

If he is meeting strangers in the street to hand over hundreds of pounds for items, albeit he doesn't know he's being set up the next time, I'd say it would warrant some actual investigation to determin the above. Failure to investigate will of course not gather further evidence to secure any type of conviction. Since the public can do very little of this on their own which is admisable, this is literally a job for the poilce.
#20
Joe909090
If he is meeting strangers in the street to hand over hundreds of pounds for items, albeit he doesn't know he's being set up the next time, I'd say it would warrant some actual investigation to determin the above. Failure to investigate will of course not gather further evidence to secure any type of conviction. Since the public can do very little of this on their own which is admisable, this is literally a job for the poilce.

In an ideal world the police would investigate every crime unfortunately we're not in an ideal world and the police are underfunded and have to prioritise what they investigate.
#21
steve1221
The police aren't interested in dong anything that requires real work. They'd rather sit in camera vans and take photo's of cars and add made up speeds to them so they can make a few quid before Christmas. . .

Yes. This is definitely what they do.
1 Like #22
riverman
steve1221
The police aren't interested in dong anything that requires real work. They'd rather sit in camera vans and take photo's of cars and add made up speeds to them so they can make a few quid before Christmas. . .
Yes. This is definitely what they do.

Saw it done two weeks ago. . .
#23
fanpages
Joe909090
How is this a 'mutual dispute'? Sure'y this is against the law?http://www.criminallawyer.co.uk/services/fraud-and-business-crime/counterfeiting-money/passing-tendering-or-delivering-counterfeit-notes-or-coins/
It is an offence under section 15 of the Forgery and Counterfeiting Act 1981 for a person to:
Pass or tender as genuine anything which is and which he knows or believes to be, a counterfeit of a currency note or of a protected coin or,
To deliver to another anything which is and which he knows or believes to be, a counterfeit, intending that the person to whom it is delivered or another shall pass or tender it as genuine,
It is also an offence for a person to deliver to another, without lawful authority or excuse, anything which is, and which he knows or believes to be, a counterfeit of a currency note or of a protected coin.
Can the victim prove the buyer knew the notes were counterfeit?
On the evidence gained so far, this "mutual dispute" would not go as far as a Court case.
I hear what you say,but if the police did arrest him , he may have had more fake notes on him & he would have to provide some sort of reason as to why he has the girls phone & that she has gave them £500 in fake notes.He may just admit it,but of course unlikely.
3 Likes #24
steve1221
The police aren't interested in dong
Some of them are.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gay_Police_Association
#25
fanpages
On the evidence gained so far, this "mutual dispute" would not go as far as a Court case.
Joe909090
If he is meeting strangers in the street to hand over hundreds of pounds for items, albeit he doesn't know he's being set up the next time, I'd say it would warrant some actual investigation to determin the above. Failure to investigate will of course not gather further evidence to secure any type of conviction. Since the public can do very little of this on their own which is admisable, this is literally a job for the poilce.

Thousands of meetings occur like this on a weekly basis.

Evidence of a crime needs to be established.

Take the counterfeit notes to a Police Station, & ask them to investigate.

WheresMeNuts
I hear what you say,but if the police did arrest him , he may have had more fake notes on him & he would have to provide some sort of reason as to why he has the girls phone & that she has gave them £500 in fake notes.He may just admit it,but of course unlikely.

Arrest him for what?

Buying & selling in public?

As I said above, until an actual crime is established/investigated, nothing will happen.
banned#26
Repot it to police and shame him on Facebook! Lots of selling site properly have him added on pages, so make locals aware
#27
fanpages
fanpages
On the evidence gained so far, this "mutual dispute" would not go as far as a Court case.
Joe909090
If he is meeting strangers in the street to hand over hundreds of pounds for items, albeit he doesn't know he's being set up the next time, I'd say it would warrant some actual investigation to determin the above. Failure to investigate will of course not gather further evidence to secure any type of conviction. Since the public can do very little of this on their own which is admisable, this is literally a job for the poilce.
Thousands of meetings occur like this on a weekly basis.
Evidence of a crime needs to be established.
Take the counterfeit notes to a Police Station, & ask them to investigate.
WheresMeNuts
I hear what you say,but if the police did arrest him , he may have had more fake notes on him & he would have to provide some sort of reason as to why he has the girls phone & that she has gave them £500 in fake notes.He may just admit it,but of course unlikely.
Arrest him for what?
Buying & selling in public?
As I said above, until an actual crime is established/investigated, nothing will happen.
Replace Arrest with Question him (my bad)...........
#28
I saw this to as it's local to me, It's shocking that the police wouldn't show up! I think I agree with the sentiment of turning up to meet him with a few friends.
#29
What a low life, hopefully he gets whats coming to him
#30
name and shame somebody please...
#31
sofiasar
Repot it to police and shame him on Facebook! Lots of selling site properly have him added on pages, so make locals aware
Try actually reading the op!
#32
I called the police last week as someone had attempted to break into my mums flat whilst we were inside

This person had rang the buzzer first to see if we were in but we didn't answer because people always ring to be let in the block.

So then he comes to the front door, he didn't knock but sounded was making loads of noise doing something (my mum thought he was trying to put something through the letter box) he then opened the door which got caught on my mums draught excluder preventing him from coming in before I shouted "he is coming through the door", he has obviously heard this and ran off.

I tried to see if I could see what he looked like by following him but I was so far behind from waiting for my mum to untangle to draught excluder that I lost him... came back and realised there was a chunk missing from the doorest where the lock is so he had obviously forced the lock.

The police repeatedly questioned my mum and I whether we had annoyed anyone who could have done this?! And then said they would not be treating it as anew attempted burglary but a criminal damage, they wouldn't be taking fingerprints or viewing the CCTV in the block.

I suspect they just couldn't be bothered or they were Fiddling the stats

Oh and I work for the police (not as an officer) so I know the definition of burglary and criminal damage.

TLDR;
- Someone obviously tried to break into my mums flat
- Police didn't care
#33
kelly1987
I called the police last week as someone had attempted to break into my mums flat whilst we were inside
This person had rang the buzzer first to see if we were in but we didn't answer because people always ring to be let in the block.
So then he comes to the front door, he didn't knock but sounded was making loads of noise doing something (my mum thought he was trying to put something through the letter box) he then opened the door which got caught on my mums draught excluder preventing him from coming in before I shouted "he is coming through the door", he has obviously heard this and ran off.
I tried to see if I could see what he looked like by following him but I was so far behind from waiting for my mum to untangle to draught excluder that I lost him... came back and realised there was a chunk missing from the doorest where the lock is so he had obviously forced the lock.
The police repeatedly questioned my mum and I whether we had annoyed anyone who could have done this?! And then said they would not be treating it as anew attempted burglary but a criminal damage, they wouldn't be taking fingerprints or viewing the CCTV in the block.
I suspect they just couldn't be bothered or they were Fiddling the stats
Oh and I work for the police (not as an officer) so I know the definition of burglary and criminal damage.
TLDR;
- Someone obviously tried to break into my mums flat
- Police didn't care
agree, criminal damage is probably better for their stats reports

Edited By: brilly on Dec 13, 2016 11:40

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