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Prescription charges if you have a job

FilthAndFurry Avatar
banned7y, 4m agoPosted 7 years, 4 months ago
Is it mandatory to pay £7.20 for medicine if you're in your twenties and have a job?
FilthAndFurry Avatar
banned7y, 4m agoPosted 7 years, 4 months ago
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#1
depends where you live. Here in wales we have free prescriptions regardless if you work or not.
#2
Lol F&F thought you knew everything,
banned#3
pcnutta
depends where you live. Here in wales we have free prescriptions regardless if you work or not.


I live in England
#4
yeah, think its that price per item, unless you have an exemption card or on benefits
#5
I thought they had reduced the prescription charge to just over £4? I think they have in Scotland
banned#6
yes of course. working persons don't get anything free!
#7
H_K
yes of course. working persons don't get anything free!


sounds like it better to not work and go on benifits :-(
banned#8
munnski
I thought they had reduced the prescription charge to just over £4? I think they have in Scotland


Its still £7.20 Ive had 3 in the last 3 weeks.
#9
Yes, unless it's Tamiflu iirc.
#10
A client will not have to pay for prescriptions if s/he:-
is in receipt of income support, income-based jobseeker's allowance or pension credit (guarantee credit). Her/his partner and dependants will also be entitled to free prescriptions. A client who is entitled to working tax credit and/or child tax credit (or is named on a valid NHS tax credit exemption certificate) may be entitled to free prescriptions, depending on her/his income.

is entitled to income support, income-based jobseeker's allowance or pension credit (guarantee credit) but does not receive it because the entitlement is less than ten pence (for up to six months from the date the benefit would have been payable). Her/his partner and dependants will also be entitled to free prescriptions.
If a client does not qualify for free treatment through an entitlement to one of the benefits in the previous paragraph, s/he may still be entitled if:-
s/he is aged 60 or over. Proof of age must be shown to the pharmacist
s/he is under 16 (proof of age must be shown to the pharmacist)
s/he is under 19 and in full-time education (proof of age and educational status must be shown to the pharmacist)
in England and Scotland, s/he is aged 16 or 17 and being financially maintained (either wholly or partly) by the local authority having left local authority care
she holds a valid maternity or valid medical exemption certificate FP92 (in England) (EC92 in Scotland) (HS 151(C) in N. Ireland). A woman who is pregnant or has had a baby during the last twelve months (including women who have had a miscarriage after the 24th week of pregnancy, or whose baby was stillborn) can apply for an exemption certificate on a form (FW8) available from her GP, midwife or health visitor
s/he suffers from a specified medical condition (see next paragraph)
s/he receives a war or service disablement pension and needs prescriptions for her/his disability, as long as s/he has obtained an exemption certificate
in England or Scotland, is a prisoner. Prisoners include a client in a young offender institution, but not a client in a secure training centre or a naval, military or air force prison.
The specified medical conditions which entitle a client to free prescriptions are:-
a permanent fistula, for example, a colostomy, requiring continuous surgical dressing or requiring an appliance
epilepsy for which s/he requires continuous anti-convulsive therapy
diabetes mellitus, except where treatment is by diet alone
myxoedema
hypoparathyroidism
myasthenia gravis
diabetes insipidus and other forms of hypopituitarism
forms of hypoadrenalism, for example, Addison's disease, for which specific substitution therapy is essential
a continuing physical disability which means that s/he cannot go out without help from another person. Temporary disabilities do not count, even if they last for several months.
A client with a specific medical condition (see previous paragraph) should apply for an exemption certificate on Form FP92A (EC92A in Scotland) (HC11B in N. Ireland) available from her/his GP, hospital, pharmacist or, in N. Ireland, Central Services Agency.
A client who cannot get full help with the cost of prescriptions may still be able to get free prescriptions on low income grounds. A client who has already paid may be entitled to a refund in some circumstances.
#11
No, it isn't mandatory, there are exemptions for people with certain chronic illnesses, like diabetes.

Also you can get different payment options if you need regular prescriptions.
banned#12
H_K;5790306
yes of course. working persons don't get anything free!

thats why most people dont actually work these days! ;-)
#13
H_K
Its still £7.20 Ive had 3 in the last 3 weeks.


you would be beter off getting a pre payment certificate.

Any yes op, if you work you have to pay £7.20 per item
banned#14
diabeticguy
A client will not have to pay for prescriptions if s/he:-
is in receipt of income support, income-based jobseeker's allowance or pension credit (guarantee credit). Her/his partner and dependants will also be entitled to free prescriptions. A client who is entitled to working tax credit and/or child tax credit (or is named on a valid NHS tax credit exemption certificate) may be entitled to free prescriptions, depending on her/his income

blah blah


Thanks for that. I think that's the stuff on the back of the prescription. I shortened it for the sake of not stretching the thread too much:thumbsup:

I don't have any of those exemptions so looks like I get to keep paying.
#15
yeah if u need reg meds get pre paymentr certificate. One price and all meds covered by it.
#16
H_K
yes of course. working persons don't get anything free!


What about education and NHS treatment ?
#17
they should get the people who are on benfits to do litter picking or something, work for the money
banned#18
MANJ_007
you would be beter off getting a pre payment certificate.



Its not a prescription I usually need regularly and didn't know I'd end up using 3 (doctors prescribing antibiotics etc which haven't worked)
#19
If you are no longer in full time education are not an OAP then you must pay £7.20 per script if you live in England.

Only a few long term conditions are exempt - my hubby takes high blood pressure pills and that is 2 scripts a month - apparently this isn't a condition as serious as someone who has thyroid or diabetes (a bone of contention as my parents get their scripts free!!).

It would be fairer if everyone paid a nominal amount. I don't think they should be free as this is opened to abuse (ie people collecting meds they don't really need) but on the other hand I don't like the knowledge that a small part of the population in the UK pay for the majorit of the UK to have free scripts!
banned#20
chesso
What about education and NHS treatment ?


Non-working people get those too - and their council tax paid for.

I'm a fan of the welfare state but it's gone too far.
banned#21
chesso
What about education and NHS treatment ?


Because that's the same?

Everyone is entitled to an education and health care, working or not, it should be the same for medicines-if someone is in need, they should be provided what they need regardless of circumstance. I work, and work hard, never submitted forms at university to get the free handouts.

The fact of it is, some persons who are in need of medicines do not go to the doctor because £10 (what most persons mentally round up £7.20 to), is too much to lose out of a pay packet.
banned#22
black gerbil1
they should get the people who are on benfits to do litter picking or something, work for the money


I think thats the most sensible post I've ever read you write...are you feeling ok?

Completely agree, those claiming jobseekers especially should do community work to gain their benefits until they find a suitable job.
banned#23
d-j mitch
If you are no longer in full time education are not an OAP then you must pay £7.20 per script if you live in England.

Only a few long term conditions are exempt - my hubby takes high blood pressure pills and that is 2 scripts a month - apparently this isn't a condition as serious as someone who has thyroid or diabetes (a bone of contention as my parents get their scripts free!!).

It would be fairer if everyone paid a nominal amount. I don't think they should be free as this is opened to abuse (ie people collecting meds they don't really need) but on the other hand I don't like the knowledge that a small part of the population in the UK pay for the majorit of the UK to have free scripts!


Makes sense.

Apparently what I need medication for isn't serious enough for me to have my taxes pay for it.
1 Like #24
FilthAndFurry
Non-working people get those too - and their council tax paid for.

I'm a fan of the welfare state but it's gone too far.


Get a 3% discount:
http://www.hotukdeals.com/item/378668/nhs-prescription-charges-3-discount/showthread.php?t=378668&page=2

88% of prescriptions are free.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/markeaston/2008/10/do_prescription_charges_make_u.html

I personally feel prescription charges are a complete waste of a huge amount of time, effort, resources etc etc - I doubt that collecting all the payments actually covers the cost of that collection. However that is the only reason I have for being against them. I am strongly in favour of society taking care of all its citizens - old, young, frail, healthy - providing care and good environments. Those who are working bear the burden of taxation and I think that is just and right. I have paid PAYE taxes for all but five years since I started work in 1974 and I do not begrudge a penny, although it infuriates me that the tax systems are unfair and apparently easy to distort for anyone not employed by the state on PAYE.

The benefit system is vital.
#25
H_K
I think thats the most sensible post I've ever read you write...are you feeling ok?

Completely agree, those claiming jobseekers especially should do community work to gain their benefits until they find a suitable job.

yeah litter picking around the streets or cleaning people homes, instead of doing nothing @ home
#26
H_K
yes of course. working persons don't get anything free!

You said ^^^

chesso
What about education and NHS treatment ?

I said this ^^^

H_K
Because that's the same?

Everyone is entitled to an education and health care, working or not, it should be the same for medicines-if someone is in need, they should be provided what they need regardless of circumstance. I work, and work hard, never submitted forms at university to get the free handouts.

The fact of it is, some persons who are in need of medicines do not go to the doctor because £10 (what most persons mentally round up £7.20 to), is too much to lose out of a pay packet.

I cannot see what this ^^^ has to do with
yes of course. working persons don't get anything free
banned#27
chesso
The benefit system is vital.


I agree, it's a safety net to provide for those who are most in need of it.

I just don't think I agree with it as much as I used to.

Because I work, I get to pay council tax, rent (if I rented) and now prescriptions too.

I am literally paying £7.20 so that I am able to work so that I can pay taxes. That is just a little unfair.
#28
FilthAndFurry
Non-working people get those too - and their council tax paid for.

I'm a fan of the welfare state but it's gone too far.


I pay for these out of my wages...so no not really free.

I don't normally add to these sort of posts but am really annoyed about this at the moment. Where I live they provide free nursery education (with private nursery schools) for 15 hours a week for 2 year olds. My daughter is not eligible because I work.... I say work because I have just started maternity leave and will soon be on just over £100 a week. Out of that I have to pay all my bills including council tax and a £750 a month mortgage. But I don't qualify because I earn too much!!!!:x:x:x

Oh but I am lucky because I don't have to pay for my prescriptions until my new baby is 12 months old!!! I'm all for helping people out, I understand that some people cannot work for what ever reason but I am starting to feel that this is taking the P***
#29
I knew you had to be on meds.
banned#30
phatboy123
I knew you had to be on meds.


They keep me balanced:thumbsup:
#31
FilthAndFurry
I agree, it's a safety net to provide for those who are most in need of it.

I just don't think I agree with it as much as I used to.

Because I work, I get to pay council tax, rent (if I rented) and now prescriptions too.

I am literally paying £7.20 so that I am able to work so that I can pay taxes. That is just a little unfair.


Yes, I can see your point and I would say that the unfariness arises because there are a myriad loop holes that are taken advantage of by all and sundry who are not just ordinary working people who pay their taxes PAYE.
It makes my blood boil to think of all those wealthy people on huge salaries paying almost nothing - all the fiddles and the off-shore stuff, all the grants for what-ever and subsidies, all the writing off of losses.
As I say I think the prescription charges are foolish and I can say one thing for sure - if we all contributed fairly in all the other taxes, there wouldn't be any need at all for prescription charges.
#32
black gerbil1
yeah litter picking around the streets or cleaning people homes, instead of doing nothing @ home


they do.....its called benefit fraud!:)
banned#33
Thank you for unspamming mods:thumbsup:
banned#34
Can you not get pre paid prescription cards down in England?
banned#35
ChipSticks
Agree, he knew the answer to the question when he asked it, but isn't going to miss out on a chance to start trouble/get people infracted/suspended/banned.

Some people are so very sad. lol :thumbsup:


I don't want anyone to get in trouble. I'm not even sure I'm the one who started talking about benefits in broader terms. If I was, I'm sorry. It's just the way my brain works on these complex issues.

It's an interesting debate though, and any views you have, or Boothy even, would be welcome.

Thanks for your time:thumbsup:
banned#36
Paddy Charlie
Can you not get pre paid prescription cards down in England?


I don't think so - I just looked at the back of the prescription and because I didn't fit any of the exemption criteria, I just paid £7.20.

Think I got some clubcard points because I got them at Tesco though, so not all bad:thumbsup:
#37
Paddy Charlie
Can you not get pre paid prescription cards down in England?


Yes you can...12-month prepayment certificate (PPC): £104.00 or
3-month PPC: £28.25 :thumbsup:

http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Healthcare/Medicinespharmacyandindustry/Prescriptions/NHScosts/index.htm
#38
The only benefit for being diabetic is that I get a free prescription and I'm in my twenties and have a job.
banned#39
cuzzy
Yes you can...12-month prepayment certificate (PPC): £104.00 or
3-month PPC: £28.25 :thumbsup:

http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Healthcare/Medicinespharmacyandindustry/Prescriptions/NHScosts/index.htm


But if I were to get 3 months supply for £7.20, then that certificate is still overpriced. I suppose it works out if you have more prescriptions, but one would've thought if you need that many then chances are you're either on disability allowance or rather old so you'd get them free anyway.

Seems a bit of a sneaky way to price it.
#40
Couldn't you get the names of your meds then buy them cheaper elsewhere?

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