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Quick network question

sancho1983 Avatar
6y, 1m agoPosted 6 years, 1 month ago
At the moment I have my router connected to a gigabit switch, then cable one going to my office, cable two to bedroom, cable three to spare room and cable four to living room - where there is another gigabit switch for BluRay, revo etc.

I need another network point in my office, can I just stick another gigabit switch on the end of cable 1? Presume it would work, not sure if there'd be a conflict anywhere though.

Also, any recommendations for a switch? I have a netgear 5 port one atm, but It's 30 quid, any cheaper alternatives?

Thanks
sancho1983 Avatar
6y, 1m agoPosted 6 years, 1 month ago
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#1
you could stick a switch in but then the link between the office switch and the switch at the router will be a bus network topology, this is very unreliable for collisions of data and if it every gets damaged as its really one road or route back to the other switch, in theory you have a link from each device back to the patch panel and then link everything with a switch which is far faster.
#2
i would stick to use netgear, i like the technology they provide and i have never had any faults or problems with netgear products, even BT/Virgin install netgears (not all the time but on numerous tmes they have used other manufactures and ran into problems only to resort to netgear equipment which gets the job done)
#3
andyhunter
you could stick a switch in but then the link between the office switch and the switch at the router will be a bus network topology, this is very unreliable for collisions of data and if it every gets damaged as its really one road or route back to the other switch, in theory you have a link from each device back to the patch panel and then link everything with a switch which is far faster.


From reading your posts on here I think you know what you're talking about, but I find them hard to read and understand.

So my way of putting a switch at the end of one of the cables will work, but not reliably?

What do you suggest I could do?

Would it be better to have cable one going to the bedroom, which goes to a switch then the two connections I need there and a third cable going to the lounge with the switch connected there?

Edited By: sancho1983 on Oct 20, 2010 10:49: asd
#4
Apologies for poor picture, but something like this...

http://i635.photobucket.com/albums/uu79/sancho_1983/Untitled-3.jpg
banned#5
You'll have no problems sticking a switch on end of cable 1. Andy Hunter is technically correct but for your home network and what you're trying to achieve you should have no concerns with connecting switches to other switches. I've done similar things at work and have a near identical set up at home with a gig switch connected to a gig access point/router with no problems.
banned#6
Netgear switch should be fine, they're reliable enough. I've extended Cisco switched networks with the netgear 5/8 porters as an ugly work around with no problems. Not sure you can get much cheaper tbh.
#7
master_chief
You'll have no problems sticking a switch on end of cable 1. Andy Hunter is technically correct but for your home network and what you're trying to achieve you should have no concerns with connecting switches to other switches. I've done similar things at work and have a near identical set up at home with a gig switch connected to a gig access point/router with no problems.


So not the way in the picture, but the way I described in the op? It would be far easier if I could do that :)
banned#8
sancho1983
master_chief
You'll have no problems sticking a switch on end of cable 1. Andy Hunter is technically correct but for your home network and what you're trying to achieve you should have no concerns with connecting switches to other switches. I've done similar things at work and have a near identical set up at home with a gig switch connected to a gig access point/router with no problems.
So not the way in the picture, but the way I described in the op? It would be far easier if I could do that :)

Can't see the picture from work but your original method should be fine. If you do find you are having problems then you can always change it and sell on the switch or repurpose it elsewhere.
#9
what is your network cable btw i.e. cat 6 i take it ? i reckon you should fibre your network infrastructure :P only joking. are you using managed or unmanaged switched presently ?
You should number is not already done your network cables and points(wall points, ports on the switch) as this makes for management purposes in future is ever tracing were a cable go and saves alot of hassel.
normally the every cable is number from 1 to what ever number, that cable corosponds to a particular point which is given a number at both ends to.
#10
Isn't this a home network?
Most of the recommendations are overkill for this purpose.

I am sure the OP does not want to spend hundreds of pounds creating a network that will be no more effective than one costing under £50.
#11
OP is there any reason for having 3 switches in the diagram you posted?
You would be best off purchasing one decent gigabit switch and connecting all cables from there to the required devices.

Adding another switch to the network would work but you would be better of just using one.

No idea why people are mentioning patch panels for this sort of network. Crazy!
#12
wall point-cable-patch panel-patch cable-switch-router...and you say you dont know what there used for hummmm...health and safety and cable management duhhhhhh...lets have x numbers of cables looking like mess going directly into a switch and better still lets try to find were each cables goes(alright if you know the network layout or have a tone tester). throughput in each area were the switch is will be faster for each indivdual device connected to each switch area than one overall single switch
#13
He could easily staple the cables alongside the wall and use different coloured cabling for each room/stick a label on each end.
Patch panel is not required for a home network. All this does is add to the cost of something that should be relatively cheap to implement.

This is a home network andyhunter. And if you remember the only questions OP asked were..

"can I just stick another gigabit switch on the end of cable 1?"
"Also, any recommendations for a switch? I have a netgear 5 port one atm, but It's 30 quid, any cheaper alternatives? "



Edited By: thrustmaster on Oct 22, 2010 00:38: .
#14
throughput in each area were the switch is will be faster for each indivdual device connected to each switch area than one overall single switch


This makes no sense, each port in a switch is a separate collision domain and provides full bandwidth. You should really research these things before giving naff advice.
#15
thrustmaster
OP is there any reason for having 3 switches in the diagram you posted?
You would be best off purchasing one decent gigabit switch and connecting all cables from there to the required devices.

Adding another switch to the network would work but you would be better of just using one.

No idea why people are mentioning patch panels for this sort of network. Crazy!


I currently have 2 switches, I installed the cable and switches last year, don't really want to change it all at the moment, all of the cable is terminated at a'network point front panel' mainly to look neat. it all works fine, but in the office I need another network point for my server, sticking another switch on seems to be the easiest way to do it.

if I put a switch in the loft, for example, to feed them all there will be cables everywhere, I have 4 devices in my front room that have a network connection so there would need to be 4 cables going to it, rather than my way, 1 cable to the front room, then a switch for them.

I appreciate the method in the picture will work better, but for the time being I'm going with what I have written in the op, ie a switch in the office
#16
thrustmaster
He could easily staple the cables alongside the wall and use different coloured cabling for each room/stick a label on each end.Patch panel is not required for a home network. All this does is add to the cost of something that should be relatively cheap to implement. This is a home network andyhunter. And if you remember the only questions OP asked were.."can I just stick another gigabit switch on the end of cable 1?""Also, any recommendations for a switch? I have a netgear 5 port one atm, but It's 30 quid, any cheaper alternatives? "
if you seriously think that stapling a cable is the correct way to place networking cable then go and work for an isp crowd and sub contractor, health and safety and the correct way you install network cable is by placing it in a seperate plastic trunking or if the cable is shielded from magnetic interference or is fibre cable then you can place in the same trunking with electrical cable that interferes with it.
serious you havnt a clue, so you would rise costs by buying boxes of i.e. cat cable but then if you have more points and areas you would run out of colours as there is only a few selected colours you can choose from. its far more effiecent and for cable management purposes to write a number on the start of the cable your going to put in, then when cutting the other end were you write the same number than corosponds to that cable, therefore that point will have the same number system you have used or you can alter the number system to suit your needs but you know excatly what cables go were, easy for termination.
a patch panel is required for both home and businesses , not only does it provide cable management solutions, easy to locate and find problems with your network, looks far better in terms of layout when adding or removing a particular device to your network, it creates a central point for all cables to go back to and all devices to be connected to, a patch panel is cheaper than buying how many boxes of cable in different colours...idiot, thats why patch panels are used to know excatly through labeling were all the cables go back as the points on the patch panel corospond to the cable and network point.
lol seriously go to college, having multiple switchs on the same network, helps to split up the areas or rooms of the network into individual areas, as if you have one switch for everything that sancho1983 connects on his network it is possible yes but that switch will result in slower preformance as it will be drained of resoruces having to carry out alot of uncessary workload, therefore having a main switch and then split up areas to have there own switches combats this issue to ensure the network throughput speed that which data travels will be extremly fast internally, reducing the chance of collosions that would have occured due to all devices bombarding a single switch and information coming inside bombarding the switch again which would be pretty daft.
#17
why split up your network old but revelant http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc723544.aspx
banned 2 Likes #18
Why has this turned into a pissing contest of who knows most about networking? It doesn't matter what the book says or what is best practice. Fundamental rule of IT is to know your client and their needs. There have been many times when I've wanted to implement combinations of L2 and L3 gigabit switches with full redundancy etc but even with all the evidence to support it I'd get laughed out of the building in most places. Trust me I made that error the moment I got my CCNA and learned quickly to listen to the needs of the client/business and come to some sort of compromise.

Some of the stuff being touted on here really is ridiculous when you consider the OP's situation and the problem he has. Did someone ask if his switch was managed or unmanaged?? Was the OP even read? A netgear 5 port gigabit switch for £30 that's managed??? Seriously?

Edited By: master_chief on Oct 23, 2010 10:58: .
#19
Not wanting to reignite the pissing contest, buuuut

Have just put the switch on but the connection from router to switch is showing as 100mbit, switch to pc gigabit and switch to server 100mbit :|

When I had the server connected with a long ass cable to another spare point I was getting transfer speeds of 90-100 mB/s, and now am getting 10, so it's definitely running at 100, not just a dodgy LED on the switch :)

Have I done something wrong?
banned#20
sancho1983
Not wanting to reignite the pissing contest, buuuutHave just put the switch on but the connection from router to switch is showing as 100mbit, switch to pc gigabit and switch to server 100mbit :| When I had the server connected with a long ass cable to another spare point I was getting transfer speeds of 90-100 mB/s, and now am getting 10, so it's definitely running at 100, not just a dodgy LED on the switch :)Have I done something wrong?

Cables ok? try different cables on the 100mb lines.
#21
One is one I have made, the other is one that came with my new BeBox (not needed) - Will try some others though

I'm going to have to start paying you!
banned#22
sancho1983
One is one I have made, the other is one that came with my new BeBox (not needed) - Will try some others thoughI'm going to have to start paying you!

Gig networks require the cabling to be spot on. If all 8 strands aren't terminated either end then it defaults to 100mb.
#23
Thanks, Re-terminated 3 of the ends and is all gigabit now :)

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