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Quick question (maths related)

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In maths the mode is the most common number but what happens when a couple of numbers appear most often? Read More
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8y, 1m agoPosted 8 years, 1 month ago
In maths the mode is the most common number but what happens when a couple of numbers appear most often?
allstar2 Avatar
8y, 1m agoPosted 8 years, 1 month ago
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#1
there both the mode ?
#2
Some data sets contain no repeated elements. In this case, there is no mode (or the mode is the empty set). It is also possible for two or more elements to be repeated with the same frequency. [COLOR="Red"]In these cases, there are two or more modes and the data set is said to be bimodal or multimodal.[/COLOR] In the rare instance of a uniform or nearly uniform distribution, one where each element is repeated the same or nearly the same number of times, one could term it multimodal, but some authors invoke subjectivity by specifying multimodality only when separate, distinct, and fairly high peaks (ignoring fluctuations due to randomness) occur.

hope that helps
#3
jackvdbuk
there both the mode ?


i thought that but can u rally have one that more mode

it was my friend asking in a text so dont want to give wrong reply :thumbsup:
#4
the sedge
Some data sets contain no repeated elements. In this case, there is no mode (or the mode is the empty set). It is also possible for two or more elements to be repeated with the same frequency. [COLOR="Red"]In these cases, there are two or more modes and the data set is said to be bimodal or multimodal.[/COLOR] In the rare instance of a uniform or nearly uniform distribution, one where each element is repeated the same or nearly the same number of times, one could term it multimodal, but some authors invoke subjectivity by specifying multimodality only when separate, distinct, and fairly high peaks (ignoring fluctuations due to randomness) occur.

hope that helps


Taken from http://www.andrews.edu/~calkins/math/webtexts/stat03.htm#Mode by any chance ;)?
1 Like #5
yeap sure has
#6
thank u very much..rep left
banned#7
the sedge
Some data sets contain no repeated elements. In this case, there is no mode (or the mode is the empty set). It is also possible for two or more elements to be repeated with the same frequency. [COLOR="Red"]In these cases, there are two or more modes and the data set is said to be bimodal or multimodal.[/COLOR] In the rare instance of a uniform or nearly uniform distribution, one where each element is repeated the same or nearly the same number of times, one could term it multimodal, but some authors invoke subjectivity by specifying multimodality only when separate, distinct, and fairly high peaks (ignoring fluctuations due to randomness) occur.

hope that helps


you're having a laff.
Are you related to Sir Stanley Unwin by any chance? :-D

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