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Sending sky hd to another room

sancho1983 Avatar
6y, 3m agoPosted 6 years, 3 months ago
Am hopefully getting sky HD installed next Friday, I want to send the video up to the bedroom so we can watch what's been recorded. My plan is to buy an hdmi switch, one going to the tv, then a 15m hdmi outside the house to the bedroom. Have a powermid xl to control the box downstairs


1. Will that work?


2. Does the 15 hdmi mean I need to buy an expensive one, or will a 15 pound one from eBay do?


3. Will the hdmi cable be ok outside the house?


4. What switch will be best?


Thanks loads if anyone can offer advice

Oh, and I don't want a video sender, tried one before and it was poor so would like to go down the cabled route
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sancho1983 Avatar
6y, 3m agoPosted 6 years, 3 months ago
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#1
just use the RF2 out on your sky box and send the signal to another room that way. You could always install return sockets like ive got in my apartment. Then you can just use a basic sky eye to control it.

Edited By: dh058977 on Oct 02, 2010 18:40: **
#2
will a magic eye not work off your rf2 outlet, then you can control box from the other room
#3
What's the quality like on that? Obviously not HD
#4
Perfect for me, I live in a new build so the sockets were already installed when i moved in.
#5
So that just uses regular coax cable? Presume the sound is carried too
#6
sancho1983
So that just uses regular coax cable? Presume the sound is carried too

Yep, can take photos if you want any.
#7
SD of course. I already had the sockets installed so it was the best option for me
#8
Yeah, makes sense.

There's a switch on Amazon with very good reviews, but It's 20 pounds, I already need one as I only have 3 hdmi sockets but will have 5 devices. 40 for 2 switches and 20 for the hdmi cable is quite a bit to spend. There's some cheap switches on eBay, but if it doesn't work it will be a waste
#9
sancho1983
Yeah, makes sense.There's a switch on Amazon with very good reviews, but It's 20 pounds, I already need one as I only have 3 hdmi sockets but will have 5 devices. 40 for 2 switches and 20 for the hdmi cable is quite a bit to spend. There's some cheap switches on eBay, but if it doesn't work it will be a waste

Are you bothered about having HD in the bedroom? what size tv will it be?
#10
Not particularly, but I want it 'scart' quality at the very least. I've tried something similar with my humax, It's cvbs output and unwatcheable

It's a 26 inch.
#11
sancho1983
Not particularly, but I want it 'scart' quality at the very least. I've tried something similar with my humax, It's cvbs output and unwatcheable It's a 26 inch.

Well I get a perfect picture on my tv with my setup so its something to consider. Although you dont actually need a switch for the set up your talking about. One of the cheap splitters that allow you to connect two outputs to one device (in this case your sky box) can be had for about £2 on ebay
#12
Can only find one for 7 pound, might buy one and give it a go, unless anyone can see cheaper ones
#13
Just bought a splitter on ebay, in the description in states

Important: Due to the current state of the technology, results using HDMI and DVI splitters can be mixed. Especially passive splitters which rely on the individual devices ability to negotiate a 3 way handshake. The problem is not all devices are programmed to deal with this properly and will sometimes default to a HDCP error state. To put it simply, some devices will consider the splitting of a signal to be a copyright violation, which could result in only one display being shown at a time or the blocking of content altogether. This type of situation is considered to be a device compatibility issue and can not be fixed short of a firmware update by the individual device manufacturers. Before purchasing this splitter, please be advised that we have no control over nor are we responsible for compatibility issues (including HDCP issues).


Don't know if this is an issue with Sky HD boxes but for £4 It's worth a go
#14
sancho1983
Just bought a splitter on ebay, in the description in states
Important: Due to the current state of the technology, results using HDMI and DVI splitters can be mixed. Especially passive splitters which rely on the individual devices ability to negotiate a 3 way handshake. The problem is not all devices are programmed to deal with this properly and will sometimes default to a HDCP error state. To put it simply, some devices will consider the splitting of a signal to be a copyright violation, which could result in only one display being shown at a time or the blocking of content altogether. This type of situation is considered to be a device compatibility issue and can not be fixed short of a firmware update by the individual device manufacturers. Before purchasing this splitter, please be advised that we have no control over nor are we responsible for compatibility issues (including HDCP issues).
Don't know if this is an issue with Sky HD boxes but for £4 It's worth a go

Still think you should have gone my route esp if there is possible issues with the hdmi splitter and you yourself said your not that bothered about getting HD upstairs. The RF2 port on your sky HD box is there for this very thing! Pair it with a sky eye and your set!
Ive got a question for you - are you going to be drilling a hole in your wall for the HDMI cable to come through? If so surely a RF plate will look better on the wall?

If you want to try it i can point you in the right direction of the things you will need

Edited By: dh058977 on Oct 03, 2010 19:09: add
#15
dh058977

Still think you should have gone my route esp if there is possible issues with the hdmi splitter. The RF2 port on your sky HD box is there for this very thing!
Ive got a question for you - are you going to be drilling a hole in your wall for the HDMI cable to come through? If so surely a RF plate will look better on the wall?


Yeah, planning on testing it before I start drilling though, If it's not suitable then I'm planning on doing it your way, just a bit unsure of the quality of picture it will give. I have enough coax and connectors in the shed to test that method too. How do you terminate the coax in the back of a face plate? You're right, it would look a lot neater



Edited By: sancho1983 on Oct 03, 2010 19:17: asd
#16
sancho1983
dh058977
sancho1983
Just bought a splitter on ebay, in the description in states
Important: Due to the current state of the technology, results using HDMI and DVI splitters can be mixed. Especially passive splitters which rely on the individual devices ability to negotiate a 3 way handshake. The problem is not all devices are programmed to deal with this properly and will sometimes default to a HDCP error state. To put it simply, some devices will consider the splitting of a signal to be a copyright violation, which could result in only one display being shown at a time or the blocking of content altogether. This type of situation is considered to be a device compatibility issue and can not be fixed short of a firmware update by the individual device manufacturers. Before purchasing this splitter, please be advised that we have no control over nor are we responsible for compatibility issues (including HDCP issues).
Don't know if this is an issue with Sky HD boxes but for £4 It's worth a go
Still think you should have gone my route esp if there is possible issues with the hdmi splitter. The RF2 port on your sky HD box is there for this very thing!Ive got a question for you - are you going to be drilling a hole in your wall for the HDMI cable to come through? If so surely a RF plate will look better on the wall?
Yeah, planning on testing it before I start drilling though, If it's not suitable then I'm planning on doing it your way, just a bit unsure of the quality of picture it will give. I have enough coax and connectors in the shed to test that method too. How do you terminate the coax in the back of a face plate? You're right, it would look a lot neater

Seriously dont worry about the picture! You want me to take a few photos? happy to do it now!
#17
Ok, yeah, that would be good, thanks
banned#18
RF should be your last resort.
#19
guv
RF should be your last resort.

And why exactly?
banned#20
dh058977
And why exactly?


Because its analogue and the worst way to hard wire distribute a TV signal.
#21
guv
dh058977
And why exactly?
Because its analogue and the worst way to hard wire distribute a TV signal.

Well for me using good quality cables its perfectly fine and i get a very good picture. Plus as ive said considering it was already installed in my flat it was the best option
#22
sancho1983
Just bought a splitter on ebay, in the description in states
Important: Due to the current state of the technology, results using HDMI and DVI splitters can be mixed. Especially passive splitters which rely on the individual devices ability to negotiate a 3 way handshake. The problem is not all devices are programmed to deal with this properly and will sometimes default to a HDCP error state. To put it simply, some devices will consider the splitting of a signal to be a copyright violation, which could result in only one display being shown at a time or the blocking of content altogether. This type of situation is considered to be a device compatibility issue and can not be fixed short of a firmware update by the individual device manufacturers. Before purchasing this splitter, please be advised that we have no control over nor are we responsible for compatibility issues (including HDCP issues).
Don't know if this is an issue with Sky HD boxes but for £4 It's worth a go

I am not sure if Sky HD content is HDCP decrypted but there may also be further issues regarding EDID. Since the signals for detecting EDID is going to be split to 2 separate devices, each device will have to report the EDID information back. Obviously, 2 devices reporting back to 1 will not go so there may be issues regarding resolution (which is part of the information reported by EDID) or there will be no data at all. Furthermore, if you are using a long HDMI cable there is possibility that the picture may not be streamed perfectly and splitting the signal will almost result in loss of data (I don't care if error correction is implemented, it cannot perform any correction if too much data is lost and I don't care if some will argue that digital is digital till they are blue in the face).

An HDMI switcher (rather than a splitter) would solve these issues since it is 1 input and 1 output allowing the 2 devices to communicate with one another without a 3rd device causing confusion with the signals. If you are using a long HDMI cable, you may experience some data loss even if it has not been split - in these circumstances, signal repeaters and shorter cables are required which adds to the expense.

As you want minimum of SCART quality pictures, you could use the 5.8Ghz wireless video sender method. I know you mentioned that you have tried one but did it operate at 2.4 Ghz frequency or 5.8 Ghz? 5.8 Ghz video senders are less prone to interference from many routers and DECT phones but they are still not immune from it though. HDMI senders are available and work remarkably well but there is no formal standards for wireless HDMI and the prices are rather eye-watering!

Edited By: ElliottC on Oct 03, 2010 19:34: .
banned#23
dh058977
Well for me using good quality cables its perfectly fine and i get a very good picture. Plus as ive said considering it was already installed in my flat it was the best option


The OP was asking for the best way to distribute his HD signal not what you have in your house. Its a simple fact - HDMI digital connections are so much better than an analogue RF broadcast I'm surprised anyone would say any different.
#24
No it doesn't have a switch, but I'm going to buy one because as I said earlier I have 5 devices but only 3 inputs.

Over 15 metres is it likely to drastically reduce quality?
#25
guv
dh058977
Well for me using good quality cables its perfectly fine and i get a very good picture. Plus as ive said considering it was already installed in my flat it was the best option
The OP was asking for the best way to distribute his HD signal not what you have in your house. Its a simple fact - HDMI digital connections are so much better than an analogue RF broadcast I'm surprised anyone would say any different.

I know we are talking about the OP's signal but your too stupid to realise that ive been talking to the OP since the start of this thread. Stop jumping to conclusions.
If you'd bother reading the rest of the thread the OP has already said that they are "not particularly" bothered about HD in the bedroom. Also i obviously know HDMI is going to be better than RF in terms of quality but my new build apartment already had the RF wall sockets installed, thats the reason why i used them. I was simply giving the OP another option

Edited By: dh058977 on Oct 03, 2010 19:39: ***
#26
Guv, I know you have 28 tvs and lots of streaming stuff, how is all yours wired up

I would like HD in the bedroom, but if I have to spend more than 40 quid I'm not that bothered, but I do want the SD to be as good as possible
#27
guv
dh058977
Well for me using good quality cables its perfectly fine and i get a very good picture. Plus as ive said considering it was already installed in my flat it was the best option
The OP was asking for the best way to distribute his HD signal not what you have in your house. Its a simple fact - HDMI digital connections are so much better than an analogue RF broadcast I'm surprised anyone would say any different.

Nobody did say any different.
banned#28
dh058977
I know we are talking about the OP's signal but your too stupid to realise that ive been talking to the OP since the start of this thread. Stop jumping to conclusions.
If you'd bother reading the rest of the thread the OP has already said that they are "not particularly" bothered about HD in the bedroom. Also i obviously know HDMI is going to be better than RF in terms of quality but my new build apartment already had the RF wall sockets installed, thats the reason why i used them. I was simply giving the OP another option


Just wow!
#29
sancho1983
No it doesn't have a switch, but I'm going to buy one because as I said earlier I have 5 devices but only 3 inputs. Over 15 metres is it likely to drastically reduce quality?

It depends on how the cable was manufactured. Some materials will reduce signal strength over certain lengths more than other materials. I need to check the official HDMI specifications to determine if the 15m HDMI cable is outside the range specified by the standards. I think a range of 10m is guaranteed so if you are using a cable longer than what is mandated, then you will require a very good cable. It may be cheaper to buy 2 shorter cables plus a repeater.

A splitter for a digital signal is certainly not a good idea. You may be lucky but I suspect that the Sky Box and the TV will need EDID information to work correctly. As I mentioned, I don't know if Sky have implented HDCP yet (last time I spoke to them there was no HDCP encryption) but if this has now been implemented (or implemented in future) you will run into trouble.

Edited By: ElliottC on Oct 03, 2010 19:46: .
#30
ElliottC
sancho1983
No it doesn't have a switch, but I'm going to buy one because as I said earlier I have 5 devices but only 3 inputs. Over 15 metres is it likely to drastically reduce quality?


It depends on how the cable was manufactured. Some materials will reduce signal strength over certain lengths more than other materials. I need to check the official; HDMI specifications to determine if HDMI is outside the standards. I think a range of 10m is guaranteed so if you are using a cable longer than what is mandated, then you will require a very good cable. It may be cheaper to buy 2 shorter cables plus a repeater.

A splitter for a digital signal is certainly not a good idea. You may be lucky but I suspect that the Sky Box and the TV will need EDID information to work correctly. As I mentioned, I don't know if Sky have implented HDCP yet (last time I spoke to them there was no HDCP encryption) but if this has now been implemented (or implemented in future) you will run into trouble.


If it works now, but then they do implement HDCP in the future then would swapping the splitter for a switch mean it would work. Obviously don't want to go to the trouble of putting the cable up and then having to do it all again. The HDMI cable will be going outside, so I don't think two shorter cables and a repeater is viable.

Confused as to what to do now and have just bought a 15 metre cable and that splitter!!
banned#31
sancho1983
Guv, I know you have 28 tvs and lots of streaming stuff, how is all yours wired up

I would like HD in the bedroom, but if I have to spend more than 40 quid I'm not that bothered, but I do want the SD to be as good as possible


They are all fed with their own individual hard wired Satellite system and hard wired PCs to my media server, so a completely different scenario to yours.

I wouldn't have thought a 15m HDMI would be an issue for signal degradation (or they wouldn't sell them!) Here's one for under a tenner. (PS - you can send me the £30 I just saved ya!) :p
#32
guv
sancho1983
Guv, I know you have 28 tvs and lots of streaming stuff, how is all yours wired up

I would like HD in the bedroom, but if I have to spend more than 40 quid I'm not that bothered, but I do want the SD to be as good as possible


They are all fed with their own individual hard wired Satellite system and hard wired PCs to my media server, so a completely different scenario to yours.

I wouldn't have thought a 15m HDMI would be an issue for signal degradation (or they wouldn't sell them!) Here's one for under a tenner. (PS - you can send me the £30 I just saved ya!) :p



I bought one for a tenner about an hour ago actually! :D plus there's no link in your post
#33
sancho1983
ElliottC
sancho1983
No it doesn't have a switch, but I'm going to buy one because as I said earlier I have 5 devices but only 3 inputs. Over 15 metres is it likely to drastically reduce quality?
It depends on how the cable was manufactured. Some materials will reduce signal strength over certain lengths more than other materials. I need to check the official; HDMI specifications to determine if HDMI is outside the standards. I think a range of 10m is guaranteed so if you are using a cable longer than what is mandated, then you will require a very good cable. It may be cheaper to buy 2 shorter cables plus a repeater.A splitter for a digital signal is certainly not a good idea. You may be lucky but I suspect that the Sky Box and the TV will need EDID information to work correctly. As I mentioned, I don't know if Sky have implented HDCP yet (last time I spoke to them there was no HDCP encryption) but if this has now been implemented (or implemented in future) you will run into trouble.
If it works now, but then they do implement HDCP in the future then would swapping the splitter for a switch mean it would work. Obviously don't want to go to the trouble of putting the cable up and then having to do it all again. The HDMI cable will be going outside, so I don't think two shorter cables and a repeater is viable.Confused as to what to do now and have just bought a 15 metre cable and that splitter!!

Yes, you can swap the splitter for a switcher. Regarding the 15m cable, I have had a look at the official HD standards and you may get away with that length of cable (but it depends on the category of the cable). However, this applies to a signal that has not been split. I am almost certain that at 15m, you will not receive a very good signal from a splitter. If HDCP and EDID are not issues with the splitter, you will almost certainly require HDMI repeater(s) and shorter cables. Sky may already have implemented HDCP, by the way, but I cannot confirm this.

Would you be willing to try a 5.8 Ghz video sender? What type of video sender did you use in the past?


Edited By: ElliottC on Oct 03, 2010 20:00: .
banned#34
sancho1983
guv
sancho1983
Guv, I know you have 28 tvs and lots of streaming stuff, how is all yours wired up

I would like HD in the bedroom, but if I have to spend more than 40 quid I'm not that bothered, but I do want the SD to be as good as possible


They are all fed with their own individual hard wired Satellite system and hard wired PCs to my media server, so a completely different scenario to yours.

I wouldn't have thought a 15m HDMI would be an issue for signal degradation (or they wouldn't sell them!) Here's one for under a tenner. (PS - you can send me the £30 I just saved ya!) :p



I bought one for a tenner about an hour ago actually! :D plus there's no link in your post


LOL.... I didnt put my paypal account in either! :pHere you go!

I bought a 5m one from ebay 3 weeks ago for 99p all nicely packaged and probably £50 from comet! Didnt even want it... just love a bargain!
#36
ElliottC


Yes, you can swap the splitter for a switcher. Regarding the 15m cable, I have had a look at the official HD standards and you may get away with that length of cable (but it depends on the category of the cable). However, this applies to a signal that has not been split. I am almost certain that at 15m, you will not receive a very good signal from a splitter. If and only if, HDCP and EDID are not issues with the splitter, you will almost certainly require HDMI repeater(s) and shorter cables. Sky may already have implemented HDCP, by the way, but I cannot confirm this.

Would you be willing to try a 5.8 Ghz video sender? What type of video sender did you use in the past?


The cable I have bought is v1.3b, so if we ignore the splitter and just presume I have this and the 15m cable would I run into any issues? Although not sure if that switch is suitable as it says 3 in and 1 out, I need 1 in and 2 out - any recommendations?

This is the one I have used before, appears to be 2.4ghz, perhaps it was my WiFi, or the phones but it was really really bad.
#37
That is more in accordance with what you want to achieve but if the specifications says 3 inputs and 1 output, I would believe that so in that respect, it is still not suitable. Pity really as this is a genuine switcher and does not result in signal loss and does not make a right blunder of the HDCP and EDID signals. You will need a similar device with multiple outputs. Assuming you have a similar device with multiple outputs,

A 15m HDMI 1.3 cable should work fine with a swticher. I don't know the maximum range of version 1.3 but it does carry a much higher bandwidth than earlier versions so you should be fine with that.

The video sender you used in the past does operate at 2.4 GHz and they are notorious for interfering with routers and DECT phones since most of them operate at 2.4 GHz. A 5.8 GHz video sender costs around £50.

Edit: Oh hang on, the HDMI switch described as 3 inputs and 1 output may be suitable. HDMI signals are bidirectional and it may operate as 3 outputs and 1 input. I need to think about this one!

Edited By: ElliottC on Oct 03, 2010 20:21: .
#38
ElliottC
That is more in accordance with what you want to achieve but if the specifications says 3 inputs and 1 output, I would believe that so in that respect, it is still not suitable. Pity really as this is a genuine switcher and does not result in signal loss and does not make a right blunder of the HDCP and EDID signals. You will need a similar device with multiple outputs. Assuming you have a similar device with multiple outputs,

A 15m HDMI 1.3 cable should work fine with a swticher. I don't know the maximum range of version 1.3 but it does carry a much higher bandwidth than earlier versions so you should be fine with that.

The video sender you used in the past does operate at 2.4 GHz and they are notorious for interfering with routers and DECT phones since most of them operate at 2.4 GHz. A 5.8 GHz video sender costs around £50.


Thanks, so I'm looking for an automatic switcher with 1 in and 2 out. The two screens will not be watched simultaneously if that makes any difference?
#39
sancho1983
ElliottC
That is more in accordance with what you want to achieve but if the specifications says 3 inputs and 1 output, I would believe that so in that respect, it is still not suitable. Pity really as this is a genuine switcher and does not result in signal loss and does not make a right blunder of the HDCP and EDID signals. You will need a similar device with multiple outputs. Assuming you have a similar device with multiple outputs,A 15m HDMI 1.3 cable should work fine with a swticher. I don't know the maximum range of version 1.3 but it does carry a much higher bandwidth than earlier versions so you should be fine with that.The video sender you used in the past does operate at 2.4 GHz and they are notorious for interfering with routers and DECT phones since most of them operate at 2.4 GHz. A 5.8 GHz video sender costs around £50.
Thanks, so I'm looking for an automatic switcher with 1 in and 2 out. The two screens will not be watched simultaneously if that makes any difference?

Possibly but I've added an extra sentence to the end of my previous post. I need to think about this unless somebody else knows.

Actually, the 3 input 1 output switch won't work even if HDMI is bidirectional because the devices that transmit or receive the signals may NOT be bidirectional - the Sky Box certainly isn't. You will need a switch with multiple outputs.

Edited By: ElliottC on Oct 03, 2010 20:26: .
#40
Have found this which seems as though it would be perfect, but a little expensive

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