Sesame Street Welcomes new character with Autism - Meet Julia - HotUKDeals
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Sesame Street Welcomes new character with Autism - Meet Julia

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Sesame Street doesn't introduce new characters all that often, but now Julia has joined the gang! She's a 4 year old with red hair, green eyes and is a bit shy. She is also the first character on the … Read More
NeoTrix Avatar
[mod] 3m, 1w agoPosted 3 months, 1 week ago
Sesame Street doesn't introduce new characters all that often, but now Julia has joined the gang! She's a 4 year old with red hair, green eyes and is a bit shy. She is also the first character on the show that has Autism!

By having Julia on the show, It should help make both children and adults more aware of just what autism is and hopefully give them a much better understanding of the condition.

What is really nice, is that the woman responsible for operating Julia, has an autistic son of her own. So there will be some real experience going into the character to give her the best chance of reaching out to raise awareness.

Some children may be confused when they first meet a child with autism, which means they may just think that they aren't 'Normal', this could result in making fun of them or a more serious form of bullying. Which unfortunately seems to be quite common.

Autistic people typically have trouble in social situations as well as knowing how to handle their emotions (as well as other things) so making the subject easier for kids to learn about, has to be good, right?

Obviously this applies to adults with autism too, but I guess Julia it's a good starting point, as children should connect better with a younger character overall.

Meet Julia! :)

https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/da94187c3fee2466569e8571149a2ebd2be0425b/0_292_2335_1401/master/2335.jpg?w=620&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=0acf3a6047e5939ac04f8a844b7650a9

Source

Handy Links for Parents

Autism Friendly Cinema Screening at various Cinemas

Kids Ear defenders - Perfect for louder events, where noise levels could cause distress - From £11.82

M&S Special Needs clothing ages 3-16 Now available

M&S School uniforms designed to make getting dressed easier

http://i.imgur.com/Cj7IT6r.png
NeoTrix Avatar
[mod] 3m, 1w agoPosted 3 months, 1 week ago
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#1
Great idea.

I cannot eloquently enough put into words what I have in my head, however I will say that I applaud this move and hope it brings a wider acceptance of the various conditions and situations people live with daily... I hope even more of this is done in the main stream media, Joining the likes of the Last leg and the few baby steps in the right direction we have already taken.
#2
Excellent.This is especially needed in America.
But what is "Normal" we are all different and bullying needs to be stamped out regardless if someone is so called "Normal" or not.Why and where does it come from that people think because your are not "normal" that you deserve less respect and a kick in the balls .
#3
NeoTrix
Handy Links for Parents...

Adding to the list:

"Autism Quiet Hour being trialled @ Tesco" (millarcat; 1 month, 3 weeks ago)
#4
UK has less awareness of Autism than America, very welcome move.
#5
As a parent of 2 boys with autism at opposite ends of the spectrum, I can safely say i have given up even trying to explain to people.. the awareness in this country is plain ignorance, I found we got better understanding in France.. so I suppose this is welcome, but really the issue isnt other kids who would be watching Sesame street its older kids year 10 upwards and adults.
1 Like #6
haritori
As a parent of 2 boys with autism at opposite ends of the spectrum, I can safely say i have given up even trying to explain to people.. the awareness in this country is plain ignorance, I found we got better understanding in France.. so I suppose this is welcome, but really the issue isnt other kids who would be watching Sesame street its older kids year 10 upwards and adults.
I couldn't agree more. Younger kids just accept others as they are. Older kids are more likely to bully of make fun and adults judge them against their peers. The older the autistic child is, the more obvious the difference is too which doesn't help.
#7
Great move. Was reading about Oscar the Grouch was introduced because they wanted to show its
ok to be different. 8)

Edited By: shabbird on Mar 20, 2017 16:55
1 Like #8
shabbird
Great move. Was reading about Oscar the Grouch was introduced because they wanted to show its
ok to be different. 8)

...it's OK to be grouchy, or it's OK to live in a trash can? ;)
#9
i think its a fantastic idea to introduce young children to Autism amongst other disabilities, but at the same time due to Seseme Street being aimed at children between 3 and 5 years old, i am not convinced that a puppet will be able to express the emotions and difficulties faced by an autistic person/child even though the puppet is being controlled by an autistic childs parent.
i may be wrong but isnt autism expressed a lot with the face ? as a puppet with hardly any movement in its face i am wondering how this will be expressed ?
lets be honest, most puppets on Seseme Street are amazing and have been teaching our children for years, im just not convinced of this one?
either way, go Seseme Street for having stab at it ;)

Edited By: lollypoplee on Mar 20, 2017 17:21: .
#10
lollypoplee
i think its a fantastic idea to introduce young children to Autism amongst other disabilities, but at the same time due to Seseme Street being aimed at children between 3 and 5 years old, i am not convinced that a puppet will be able to express the emotions and difficulties faced by an autistic person/child even though the puppet is being controlled by an autistic childs parent.
i may be wrong but isnt autism expressed a lot with the face ? as a puppet with hardly any movement in its face i am wondering how this will be expressed ?
lets be honest, most puppets on Seseme Street are amazing and have been teaching our children for years, im just not convinced of this one?
either way, go Seseme Street for having stab at it ;)


well they are pretty skilled at showing emotion through puppetry so don't worry about it too much.
#11
lollypoplee
...i may be wrong but isnt autism expressed a lot with the face ?

Perhaps the lack of facial expression (or recognition), yes; but every other Sesame Street character (muppet) will be the same in that regard.

The experience of the puppeteer will, I hope, be able to portray nuances in other physical actions (such as stimming) that must be different from the regular characters in order to demonstrate such differences exist.
1 Like #12
fanpages
NeoTrix
Handy Links for Parents...
Adding to the list:
"Autism Quiet Hour being trialled @ Tesco" (millarcat; 1 month, 3 weeks ago)
Autism Quiet Hour, are they taking the ****? oO

...oh, it's everyone else be quiet for autistic people, ok carry on :p
1 Like #13
lollypoplee
i think its a fantastic idea to introduce young children to Autism amongst other disabilities, but at the same time due to Seseme Street being aimed at children between 3 and 5 years old, i am not convinced that a puppet will be able to express the emotions and difficulties faced by an autistic person/child even though the puppet is being controlled by an autistic childs parent.
i may be wrong but isnt autism expressed a lot with the face ? as a puppet with hardly any movement in its face i am wondering how this will be expressed ?
lets be honest, most puppets on Seseme Street are amazing and have been teaching our children for years, im just not convinced of this one?
either way, go Seseme Street for having stab at it ;)
Autism isn't recognisable from a face at all. People do not 'look' autistic. This only demonstrates the need for more understanding and awareness. It's a very welcome development and will only help.
2 Likes #14
Great if it educates people!
#15
lollypoplee
i think its a fantastic idea to introduce young children to Autism amongst other disabilities, but at the same time due to Seseme Street being aimed at children between 3 and 5 years old, i am not convinced that a puppet will be able to express the emotions and difficulties faced by an autistic person/child even though the puppet is being controlled by an autistic childs parent.
i may be wrong but isnt autism expressed a lot with the face ? as a puppet with hardly any movement in its face i am wondering how this will be expressed ?
lets be honest, most puppets on Seseme Street are amazing and have been teaching our children for years, im just not convinced of this one?
either way, go Seseme Street for having stab at it ;)
Asddad
Autism isn't recognisable from a face at all. People do not 'look' autistic...

The lack of direct eye contact, or the fixation on a singular point in space, &/or attention on a particular object, during interaction/conversation (if the autistic individual can communicate verbally) may be a clue, though.
#17
fanpages
lollypoplee
i think its a fantastic idea to introduce young children to Autism amongst other disabilities, but at the same time due to Seseme Street being aimed at children between 3 and 5 years old, i am not convinced that a puppet will be able to express the emotions and difficulties faced by an autistic person/child even though the puppet is being controlled by an autistic childs parent.
i may be wrong but isnt autism expressed a lot with the face ? as a puppet with hardly any movement in its face i am wondering how this will be expressed ?
lets be honest, most puppets on Seseme Street are amazing and have been teaching our children for years, im just not convinced of this one?
either way, go Seseme Street for having stab at it ;)
Asddad
Autism isn't recognisable from a face at all. People do not 'look' autistic...
The lack of direct eye contact, or the fixation on a singular point in space, &/or attention on a particular object, during interaction/conversation (if the autistic individual can communicate verbally) may be a clue, though.

I thought my daughter wasn't autistic because she was the opposite, she stares at you intensely whilst speaking with you. She also gives the hardest soft cuddles ever X) turns out that she is understimulated so needs to be rougher/more intense to 'feel' it.
#18
Mandz27
I thought my daughter wasn't autistic because she was the opposite, she stares at you intensely whilst speaking with you. She also gives the hardest soft cuddles ever X) turns out that she is understimulated so needs to be rougher/more intense to 'feel' it.

That is usually coupled with a high tolerance to pain.

Does she also have a particular affinity to a specific sound/noise, or to music, in general?
1 Like #19
fanpages
Mandz27
I thought my daughter wasn't autistic because she was the opposite, she stares at you intensely whilst speaking with you. She also gives the hardest soft cuddles ever X) turns out that she is understimulated so needs to be rougher/more intense to 'feel' it.
That is usually coupled with a high tolerance to pain.
Does she also have a particular affinity to a specific sound/noise, or to music, in general?

She does have a high pain tolerance unless you touch her hair, which is a nightmare for washing, drying and brushing it!

She does like music as long as it's at a low level and has to have her ocean sounds to fall asleep to.
1 Like #20
Mandz27
She does have a high pain tolerance unless you touch her hair, which is a nightmare for washing, drying and brushing it!

...I won't ask about outings to the hairdressers!

Fingers-crossed for you that it gets easier as your daughter gets older.

Mandz27
She does like music as long as it's at a low level and has to have her ocean sounds to fall asleep to.

:)

At least that is music you don't mind listening to as well. It could be a lot worse!
1 Like #21
fanpages
Mandz27
She does have a high pain tolerance unless you touch her hair, which is a nightmare for washing, drying and brushing it!
...I won't ask about outings to the hairdressers!
Fingers-crossed for you that it gets easier as your daughter gets older.
Mandz27
She does like music as long as it's at a low level and has to have her ocean sounds to fall asleep to.
:)
At least that is music you don't mind listening to as well. It could be a lot worse!

We can't do hairdressers, we tried once and she refuses to go back, but I have managed to learn how to trim her hair to keep it straight :) but she can sit on it now it's that long! oO

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